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Ephesians 1:10 with a view to an administration suitable to the fulness of the times, [that is], the summing up of all things in Christ, things in the heavens and things upon the earth. In Him

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Ephesians 1:10 >

      10. Translate, "Unto the dispensation of the fulness of the times," that is, "which He purposed in Himself" (Eph 1:9) with a view to the economy of (the gracious administration belonging to) the fulness of the times (Greek, "fit times," "seasons"). More comprehensive than "the fulness of the time" (Ga 4:4). The whole of the Gospel times (plural) is meant, with the benefits to the Church dispensed in them severally and successively. Compare "the ages to come" (Eph 2:7). "The ends of the ages" (Greek, 1Co 10:11); "the times (same Greek as here, 'the seasons,' or 'fitly appointed times') of the Gentiles" (Lu 21:24); "the seasons which the Father hath put in His own power" (Ac 1:7); "the times of restitution of all things which God hath spoken by the prophets since the world began" (Ac 3:20, 21). The coming of Jesus at the first advent, "in the fulness of time," was one of these "times." The descent of the Holy Ghost, "when Pentecost was fully come" (Ac 2:1), was another. The testimony given by the apostles to Him "in due time" ("in its own seasons," Greek) (1Ti 2:6) was another. The conversion of the Jews "when the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled," the second coming of Christ, the "restitution of all things," the millennial kingdom, the new heaven and earth, shall be severally instances of "the dispensation of the fulness of the times," that is, "the dispensation of" the Gospel events and benefits belonging to their respective "times," when severally filled up or completed. God the Father, according to His own good pleasure and purpose, is the Dispenser both of the Gospel benefits and of their several fitting times (Ac 1:7).
      gather together in one--Greek, "sum up under one head"; "recapitulate." The "good pleasure which He purposed," was "to sum up all things (Greek, 'THE whole range of things') in Christ (Greek, 'the Christ,' that is, His Christ)" [ALFORD]. God's purpose is to sum up the whole creation in Christ, the Head of angels, with whom He is linked by His invisible nature, and of men with whom He is linked by His humanity; of Jews and Gentiles; of the living and the dead (Eph 3:15); of animate and inanimate creation. Sin has disarranged the creature's relation of subordination to God. God means to gather up all together in Christ; or as Col 1:20 says, "By Him to reconcile all things unto Himself, whether things in earth or things in heaven." ALFORD well says, "The Church of which the apostle here mainly treats, is subordinated to Him in the highest degree of conscious and joyful union; those who are not His spiritually, in mere subjugation, yet consciously; the inferior tribes of creation unconsciously; but objectively, all are summed up in Him."

JFB.


Questions Related to this Verse

Where in Scripture does it say that the atonement JESUS made was ordained by God?

Where in Scripture does it say that Jesus Christ is the head of the Church?

Where in Scripture does it mention prophecies about the prosperity of Gods people?

Where in scripture does it mention the unity of the Church?

Where in Scripture does it mention prophecies about equality in the kingdom of Jesus?

Where In Scripture Does It Talk About Predestination?

Where in scripture does it mention the fullness of Time?

Where in Scripture does it mention prophecies about equality in the Kingdom of Jesus?

Where in Scripture does it talk about Jesus as the Saviour?

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Ephesians Images and Notes

The Book of Ephesians

Ephesians 2:2-3 - Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience: Among whom also we all had our conversation in times past in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others.

Ephesians 2:8-10 - For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works, lest any man should boast. For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.

Ephesians 6:11-17 - Put on the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.

Ephesians in The New Testament - A Brief Overview

Painting of the Apostle Paul by Rembrandt - 1657
Painting of Paul the Apostle by Rembrandt - 1657

Introduction to The Book of Ephesians

Brief Summary. Paul instructs the church that Christianity is for all men, Jews, gentiles, male female, bond, free, all are united in Christ. All men can enter, but it is only by grace, through faith in Christ, and this is God's free gift. The Christian can never revert back to the law of Moses, and to overcome the powers of darkness the believers must unite in Christ.

Summary of The Book of Ephesians

Purpose. While Paul was in prison he had been thinking about his work as an apostle. He realized that Christ came to unite Himself with man, and unity was the core purpose of the book of Ephesians. The Church of Jesus Christ is now the spiritual body of believers who represent Christ on earth. The great truth of Christianity is that God is the uniting the world to Himself through the believers. The idea of unity can be seen clearly in the first chapter of Ephesians ( Ephesians 1:3-10), and this principle of unity is seen throughout the rest of the entire book. God's one eternal purpose is to unite one body of believers through Christ, "the church, which is his body, the fulness of him who filleth all in all" (Ephesians 1:22-23). The Christian is saved by grace, through faith, and the very faith is a gift of God, therefore no one can boast. Christianity is is about God uniting Himself with man, through Jesus Christ, and men being united in Jesus Christ, and this great opportunity is God's gift.

Audience. The book is address by Paul to the church at Ephesus. Most early writers spoke of the epistle as having been addressed to the Ephesians.

Authorship. Paul names himself as the author of the epistle to the Ephesians (Ephesians 1:1 and 3:1). Several of the early church writers site the book of Ephesians, for example Irenaeus and Clement of Alexandria both state that Paul was its author. The style of writing is clearly Paul's, he begins with his customary personal greetings and words of thanks, and addresses issues of doctrine, as with the rest of his letters.

Date. Most scholars agree that Paul wrote his letter to the Ephesians towards the end of his first imprisonment in Rome (Ephesians 3:1; 4:1), which would have been around 61 AD. The letter was hand delivered by Tychicus (Ephesians 6:21) just as the letter to the Colossians had been (Colossians 4:7-9).

Audience. The book is address by Paul to the church at Ephesus. Most early writers spoke of the epistle as having been addressed to the Ephesians.

Outline of the Book of Ephesians

The Believers Position United to God - Chapters 1-3
The Believers Privileges United to One Another - Chapters 4-5
The Believers Protection United Against the Evil One- Chapter 6

Jesus written in Hebrew
The Name Jesus In Ancient Hebrew Text
"Yeshua" in First Century Hebrew Text. This is how the name "Jesus" would have been written in ancient Hebrew documents. The four letters or consonants from right to left are Yod, Shin, Vav, Ayin (Y, SH, OO, A). Jesus is the Greek name for the Hebrew name Joshua or Y'shua which means "The LORD or Yahweh is Salvation".

Ephesians Maps and Resources

Map of the Roman Empire (14 A.D.) - This map reveals the Roman Empire during the time shortly after the birth of Jesus, in 14 AD at the time of the death of Augustus. The order which prevailed in this extensive empire, the good military roads, and the use of Koine Greek as the general language of culture throughout the area were among the factors which multiplied the rapid spread of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. (Color Map)

Map of Paul's First Missionary Journey (48 A.D.) - This map reveals the areas in Asia Minor where Paul visited in his first missionary journey. Around 48 AD, in the springtime, Paul and his companions Barnabas and Mark were sent on a mission from the church in Antioch. This would be the first of Paul's Missionary Journey's. (Color Map)

Map of Paul's Second Missionary Journey (51 A.D.) - This map reveals the areas in Asia and Greece where Paul visited in his second missionary journey. Paul re-visits a couple cities in Asia, one of which was Lystra where he was stoned and left for dead a few years earlier. He later has a vision that leads him over to Greece and Paul and his companions travel and minister in various cities in Greece (Philippi, Thessalonica, Berea, Athens and Corinth. Later Paul returns to Ephesus and finally to Caesarea and Antioch. (Color Map)

Map of Paul's Third Missionary Journey (54 A.D.) - This map reveals the areas in Asia and Greece where Paul visited in his third missionary journey. On Paul's third missionary journey he returned to the cities he had first visited on his first missionary journey. During this time he decided to remain in Ephesus for about 3 years, and this city was the main focus of his activities and an important Christian community (Acts 19). (Color Map)

Map of the New Testament World - This map reveals the "Nations" within the ancient world during the first century A.D., the time of the New Testament. The map includes the areas of Israel, Asia, Greece, and Italy. (Color Map)

Map of New Testament Asia - This map shows the cities within Asia Minor during the first century A.D., the time of the New Testament. The map includes the principal cities of Asia including Tarsus, Ephesus, and Colossae, and provinces like Galatia and Pamphilia. (Color Map)