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Habakkuk 2:17 "For the violence done to Lebanon will overwhelm you, And the devastation of [its] beasts by which you terrified them, Because of human bloodshed and violence done to the land, To the town and all its inhabitants.

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Habakkuk 2:18 >

      17. the violence of Lebanon--thy "violence" against "Lebanon," that is, Jerusalem (Isa 37:24; Jer 22:23; Eze 17:3, 12; for Lebanon's cedars were used in building the temple and houses of Jerusalem; and its beauty made it a fit type of the metropolis), shall fall on thine own head.
      cover--that is, completely overwhelm.
      the spoil of beasts, which made them afraid--MAURER explains, "the spoiling inflicted on the beasts of Lebanon (that is, on the people of Jerusalem, of which city 'Lebanon' is the type), which made them afraid (shall cover thee)." But it seems inappropriate to compare the elect people to "beasts." I therefore prefer explaining, "the spoiling of beasts," that is, such as is inflicted on beasts caught in a net, and "which makes them afraid (shall cover thee)." Thus the Babylonians are compared to wild beasts terrified at being caught suddenly in a net. In cruel rapacity they resembled wild beasts. The ancients read, "the spoiling of wild beasts shall make THEE afraid." Or else explain, "the spoiling of beasts (the Medes and Persians) which (inflicted by thee) made them afraid (shall in turn cover thyself--revert on thyself from them)." This accords better with the parallel clause, "the violence of Lebanon," that is, inflicted by thee on Lebanon. As thou didst hunt men as wild beasts, so shalt thou be hunted thyself as a wild beast, which thou resemblest in cruelty.
      because of men's blood--shed by thee; repeated from Hab 2:8. But here the "land" and "city" are used of Judea and Jerusalem: not of the earth and cities generally, as in Hab 2:8.
      the violence of the land, &c.--that is, inflicted on the land by thee.

JFB.


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Habakkuk Images and Notes

The Book of Habakkuk

Habakkuk 1:13 - [Thou art] of purer eyes than to behold evil, and canst not look on iniquity: wherefore lookest thou upon them that deal treacherously, [and] holdest thy tongue when the wicked devoureth [the man that is] more righteous than he?

Habakkuk 2:4 - Behold, his soul [which] is lifted up is not upright in him: but the just shall live by his faith.

Habakkuk 3:16-19 - When I heard, my belly trembled; my lips quivered at the voice: rottenness entered into my bones, and I trembled in myself, that I might rest in the day of trouble: when he cometh up unto the people, he will invade them with his troops. Although the fig tree shall not blossom, neither [shall] fruit [be] in the vines; the labour of the olive shall fail, and the fields shall yield no meat; the flock shall be cut off from the fold, and [there shall be] no herd in the stalls: Yet I will rejoice in the LORD, I will joy in the God of my salvation. The LORD God [is] my strength, and he will make my feet like hinds' [feet], and he will make me to walk upon mine high places. To the chief singer on my stringed instruments.

The Old Testament - A Brief Overview

Bible Survey - Habakkuk
Hebrew Name - Chavaquq "Embrace"
Greek Name - Habakkouk (Greek form of the Hebrew)
Author - Habakkuk (According to Tradition)
Date - 626 BC Approximately
Theme - The Judgement of the Babylonians
Types and Shadows - In Habakkuk Jesus will judge the oppressors

Summary of The Book of Habakkuk

The prophet Habakkuk asked God two questions: (1) Why would you allow so much  corruption to continue in the land of Judah for so long without being punished?  God told Habakkuk that he was going to do something spectacular, He was raising up the cruel and violent Babylonians to come and crush the land of Judah. (2) Why would a holy God allow such a wicked people as the Babylonians to come and ravage the land of Judah whom He loves? God told Habakkuk that the Babylonians are fearless and determined and they scoff at Kings, and they would become his instrument of judgment because of the land of Judah's wickedness for they had forsaken God. But the mighty Babylonians would have a day of judgment coming upon themselves as well. Habakkuk also gave hope to God's people of a future glory where the "earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea" (Habakkuk 2:14). - The above text is © Rusty Russell - Bible History Online and must be sourced for use on a website.

There is little known about the man  Habakkuk, he began to prophesy around the same time as Jeremiah in the latter part of the seventh century BC. This was a time after the northern kingdom of Israel have fallen, and only the southern kingdom of Judah remained. They had their moments of glory yet their disobedience was uncurable, and the Babylonians were on the rise.

Outline of the Book of Habakkuk

Habakkuk makes complaints against God and God's answers to these complaints. Habakkuk exemplifies a great faith and a high conception of God, but he is perplexed because events have not taken the course which he had desired.

The first complaint which he brings is in Habakkuk 1:2-4 and he says that his preaching to the people has not resulted in repentance on their part: God's answer to this is that he is raising up the Chaldeans to punish the Jews for their disobedience (Habakkuk 1:5-11). This leads Habakkuk to his second complaint - Why would God punish His own people at the hand of a nation which is even more wicked and unholy than that which is being punished? (Habakkuk 1:12-2:1). God then assures Habakkuk that the Chaldeans are not to go without punishment and that unwavering faith on the part of the Jews will ultimately be rewarded (Habakkuk 2:2-4). Habakkuk 2:5-20 contains a condemnation and threat of punishment for aggression, violence, and idolatry. The final chapter of the book is a song of praise of God and His judgment, exemplifying belief in the principle set out in Habakkuk 2:4, "the just shall live by his faith."

The First Day. Light.

Habakkuk Resources

The Divided Kingdom
The Northern Kingdom of Israel
The Southern Kingdom of Judah
The Assyrian Captivity
The Babylonian Captivity
The Return From Babylon
The Prophets
The Messiah

The Book of Habakkuk

More About the Book of Habakkuk
Habakkuk in the Picture Study Bible
Chart of the Prophets of Israel and Judah
Timeline of the Ancient World
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