The Divisions of Herod's Kingdom

Luke 1:5 - There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judaea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the course of Abia: and his wife [was] of the daughters of Aaron, and her name [was] Elisabeth. 
 

The New Testament - A Brief Overview

Map of the Divisions of Herod's Kingdom After His Death

Map of the Divisions of Herod's Kingdom in the New Testament
Map of the Tetrarchies and Roman Administration of Israel - White | Color | PDF

Herod's Kingdom Divided

After Herod the Great had died his kingdom was divided among his three sons, Antipas, Phillip, and Archelaus. Archelaus inherited Judea, Antipas was given Galilee and Perea (Transjordan), and Phillip inherited the predominantly Gentile areas east and north of the Sea of Galilee. Caesar Augustus quickly removed Archelaus after there were so many bad reports about him from the Jews. Read More about Herod's Sons.

Herod the Great's Kingdom

During the time of the birth of Jesus in the New Testament Israel was under the dominion of King Herod "the Great". Herod was the son of Antipater, an Idumean (Edomite) who had come to the aid of Julius Caesar in Alexandria and was made chief minister of Judea in 47 BC. Later in 40 BC Marc Antony and Octavian and the Roman Senate appointed Herod as King of Judea. Although he had many enemies to overcome, Herod defeated them and made himself the recognized king of Judea in 37 BC. Also see Herod the King

"HEROD THE GREAT was the second son of Antipater, an Idumean, who was appointed procurator of Judea by Julius Caesar, B.C. 47...In B.C. 41 he was appointed by Antony tetrarch of Judea. Forced to abandon Judea the following year, he fled to Rome, and received the appointment of king of Judea. In the course of a few years, by the help of the Romans he took Jerusalem (B.C. 37), and completely established his authority throughout his dominions." - Smith's Bible Dictionary

HEROD THE GREAT (Matthew 2; Luke 1:5), second son of Antipater (who was appointed by Julius Caesar procurator of Judaea, 47 B.C.) and Cypros, a noble Arabian. At the time of Antipater's elevation, though only 15 (or as other passages of Josephus make probable, 20), he received the government of Galilee and soon afterwards Coelo-Syria. He skillfully gained the favor of Antony, who made him and his elder brother Phasael joint tetrarchs of Judea. Forced to abandon Judaea by the Parthians, who supported Antigonus the representative of the Asmonaean dynasty, Herod fled to Rome (40 B.C.), where he was well received by Antony and Octavian, and made by the senate "king of Judea." With Roman help he took Jerusalem (37 B.C.), slew his leading adversaries there, including the whole Sanhedrin except two, and established his kingly authority. - Fausset's Bible Dictionary

Scriptures about Herod the Great

Luke 1:5 - There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judaea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the course of Abia: and his wife [was] of the daughters of Aaron, and her name [was] Elisabeth. 

Matthew 2:1 - Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, 

Matthew 2:13 - And when they were departed, behold, the angel of the Lord appeareth to Joseph in a dream, saying, Arise, and take the young child and his mother, and flee into Egypt, and be thou there until I bring thee word: for Herod will seek the young child to destroy him. 

Matthew 2:16 - Then Herod, when he saw that he was mocked of the wise men, was exceeding wroth, and sent forth, and slew all the children that were in Bethlehem, and in all the coasts thereof, from two years old and under, according to the time which he had diligently enquired of the wise men. 

The New Testament
Charts
Maps
The Birth of John the Baptist
The Birth of Jesus
The Childhood of Jesus
John the Baptist Appears
The Baptism of Jesus
The Temptation of Jesus
Jesus Begins His Work
Jesus Cleanses the Temple

Jesus Meets Nicodemus
The Imprisonment of John
The Sermon on the Mount
The Twelve are Chosen
Raising the Widow's Son
John's Inquiry from Prison
Jesus Calms the Storm
Jesus Raises Jairus' Daughter
The Death of John the Baptist
Feeding the Multitudes
The Transfiguration
Jesus Leaves Galilee
Jesus Rejected at Samaria
Jesus Raises Lazarus
The Mission of the Seventy
The Feast at Bethany
The Triumphal Entry
The Last Supper
The Betrayal
The Crucifixion
The Resurrection
The Ascension
The Holy Spirit is Given
The Church is Established
The First Persecutions
Philip at Samaria
Conversion of Saul
The First Gentile Converted
The Church at Antioch
James Killed by Herod
Paul's Conversion
Paul's 1st Missionary Journey
Council at Jerusalem
Paul's 2nd Missionary Journey
Paul's 3rd Missionary Journey
Paul's Arrest at Jerusalem
Paul at Caesarea
Paul's Journey to Rome
Paul Arrives at Rome
Paul's Imprisonment at Rome
Paul is Acquitted
Paul Visits Various Places
Paul's 2nd Prison at Rome
The Martyrdom of Paul
The Destruction of Jerusalem


The Story of the Bible

The New Testament
About
Divisions
Timeline
NT Charts
NT Maps

The Birth of John the Baptist
The Birth of Jesus
The Childhood of Jesus
Beginning of John the Baptist's Ministry
The Baptism of Jesus
The Temptation of Christ
Jesus Begins His Public Ministry
Jesus Cleanses the Temple
Jesus Meets Nicodemus
The Imprisonment of John the Baptist
The Sermon on the Mount
The Twelve Disciples are Chosen
The Raising of the Widow's Son
John the Baptist's Inquiry from Prison
Jesus Calming the Storm
Jesus Raises Jairus' Daughter
The Death of John the Baptist
The Feeding of the Multitudes
The Transfiguration of Jesus
Jesus Leaves Galilee for the Last Time
Jesus is Rejected at Samaria
Jesus Raises Lazarus from the Dead
The Mission of the Seventy
The Feast at Bethany
The Last Supper with His Disciples
The Betrayal by Judas
The Crucifixion of Jesus
The Resurrection of Jesus
The Ascension of Jesus
The Holy Spirit is Poured Out
The Church is Established
The First Persecutions of the Christians
Philip at Samaria
The Conversion of Saul
The First Gentile is Converted
The Founding of the Church at Antioch
The Gospel of Matthew is Written
James is Killed by Herod
Paul's Conversion on the Road to Damascus
Paul's First Missionary Journey Begins
The Council at Jerusalem
Paul's Second Missionary Journey Begins
I Thessalonians is Written
II Thessalonians is Written
Paul's Third Missionary Journey Begins
I Corinthians is Written
Galatians is Written
II Corinthians is Written
Romans is Written
The Gospel of Luke is Written

Paul's Arrest at Jerusalem
Paul at Caesarea
Paul's Journey to Rome
Paul Reaches Rome
Paul's Imprisonment at Rome
Ephesians is Written
Philippians is Written
Colossians is Written
Philemon is Written
James is Written
I Peter is Written
Acts is Written

Paul is Acquitted
He Visits Various Places
Hebrews is Written
I Timothy is Written
Titus is Written
The Gospel of Mark is Written
II Peter is Written

Paul's 2d Imprisonment at Rome
2 Timothy is Written
Martyrdom of Paul
Jude is Written
Destruction of Jerusalem
John's Writings

Conclusion
Bibliography and Credits

Summary of the New Testament Books

Matthew
Mark
Luke
John
Acts
Romans
1 Corinthians
2 Corinthians
Galatians
Ephesians
Philippians
Colossians
1 Thessalonians
2 Thessalonians
1 Timothy
2 Timothy
Titus
Philemon
Hebrews
James
1 Peter
2 Peter
1 John
2 John
3 John
Jude
Revelation


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