Ancient Near East : Coins


Coins references/bibliography numismatic references. [Ancient Near East] [Coins]

Crusader Kingdoms (coins) About the Crusaders. [Ancient Near East] [Coins]

Romaion/Byzantine Empire 2 (coins) Renamed Constantinople in 330 AD, the ancient city of Byzantion gave its name to a combined Greek and Roman culture that lasted for almost 1000 years. The `Byzantines` never referred to each other as such; they called themselves Romaioi, the Greek word for Roman. In 1453 AD, the Ottoman Turks overran Constantinople, putting an end to the Romaioi and the Middle Ages. [Ancient Near East] [Coins]

Romaion/Byzantine Empire 3 (coins) Renamed Constantinople in 330 AD, the ancient city of Byzantion gave its name to a combined Greek and Roman culture that lasted for almost 1000 years. The `Byzantines` never referred to each other as such; they called themselves Romaioi, the Greek word for Roman. In 1453 AD, the Ottoman Turks overran Constantinople, putting an end to the Romaioi and the Middle Ages. [Ancient Near East] [Coins]

Seleucid Empire (coins) The coins and history of asia. The Seleucid empire at its greatest stretched from Thrace to India and included almost all of Alexander the Great's conquests, except Egypt. Seleucus, one of Alexander's generals, became satrap of Babylonia in 321 BC. In a prolonged power struggle between the "Successors" (Diadochoi) -- Ptolemy (Egypt), Lysimachos (Thrace), Cassander (Macedon and Greece) and Seleucus ganged up on Antigonas (Asia), defeating him at the battle of Ipsus in 301 BC. Seleucus was assassinated by the disgruntled son of Ptolemy in 281 BC. The kingdom was a major center of Hellenistic culture, maintaining the pre-eminence of Greek customs and manners over the Middle East. It began to decline in 190 BC after a first defeat by the Romans and lasted until 64 BC when the last Seleucid king, Antiochus XIII, was murdered by Sampsiceramus, an Arab emir, at the behest of Pompey. [Persian Empire] [coins]

The Coins and History of Asia Containing information and scans of over 3000 coins, these pages are to be a resource for students of Near Eastern, Persian, Indian, Central Asian and Chinese history from 600 BC to 1600 AD. Permanent exhibits with emphasis on Sasanian, Hunnic and Central Asian coinages. Check back often and reload everything because I'm adding all the time. Begun in July 1996, I've resigned myself to the fact that this will take the better part of several dozen more years to complete. Oh well. In a state of continuous flux, Summer, 2008. Want to learn more about Oriental coins? Join the Oriental Numismatic Society. AV=Gold, AR=Silver, AE=Bronze, Brass, Copper, etc., PB=Lead, FE=Iron, Billon=an alloy of AE and AR v. after a catalogue number means it is a variant of that type (?) means i'm not sure; (!) signifies an unusual or unique aspect [Persian Empire] [coins]