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November 20    Scripture



People - Ancient Greece: Polemo
Ancient Greek king of Pontus and the Bosporus.

Polĕmon in Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (1898) 1. I. A king of Pontus and the Bosporus. He was the son of Zenon, the orator of Laodicea. As a reward for the services rendered by his father as well as himself, he was appointed by Antony in B.C. 39 to the government of a part of China; and he subsequently obtained in exchange the kingdom of Pontus. He accompanied Antony in his expedition against the Parthians in 36. After the battle of Actium he was able to make his peace with Octavian, who confirmed him in his kingdom. About the year 16 he was intrusted by Agrippa with the charge of reducing the kingdom of Bosporus, of which he was made king after conquering the country. His reign after this was long and prosperous; he extended his dominions as far as the river TanaÔs; but having engaged in an expedition against the barbarian tribe of the Aspurgians, he was not only defeated by them, but taken prisoner, and put to death. By his second wife Pythodoris, who succeeded him on the throne, he left two sons, Polemon II., and Zenon, king of Armenia, and one daughter, who was married to Cotys, king of Thrace. 2. II. Son of the preceding and of Pythodoris. He was raised to the sovereignty of Pontus and Bosporus by Caligula in A.D. 39. Bosporus was afterwards taken from him by Claudius, who assigned it to Mithridates, while he gave Polemon a portion of Cilicia in its stead, 41. In 62 Polemon was induced by Nero to abdicate the throne, and Pontus was reduced to the condition of a Roman province. 3. Of Athens, an eminent Platonic philosopher. He was the son of Philostratus, a man of wealth and political distinction. In his youth, Polemon was extremely profligate; but one day, when he was about thirty, on his bursting into the school of Xenocrates at the head of a band of revellers, his attention was so arrested by the discourse, which chanced to be upon temperance, that he tore off his garland and remained an attentive listener, and from that day he adopted an abstemious course of life, and continued to frequent the school, of which, on the death of Xenocrates, he became the head, B.C. 315. He died in 273 at a great age. He esteemed the object of philosophy to be, to exercise men in things and deeds, not in dialectic speculation. He placed the summum bonum in living according to the laws of nature.

Polemon in Wikipedia Polemon (or Polemo) is the name of eminent ancient Greeks: Philosophers Polemon (scholarch) Polemon (Greek: Πολέμων; d. 270/269 BC) of Athens was an eminent Platonist philosopher and Plato's third successor as scholarch or head of the Academy from 314/313 to 270/269 BC. A pupil of Xenocrates, he believed that philosophy should be practiced rather than just studied, and he placed the highest good in living according to nature. Life Polemon was the son of Philostratus, a man of wealth and political distinction. In his youth, he was extremely profligate; but one day, when he was about thirty, on his bursting into the school of Xenocrates, at the head of a band of revellers, his attention was so arrested by the discourse, which the master continued calmly in spite of the interruption, and which chanced to be upon temperance, that he tore off his garland and remained an attentive listener, and from that day he adopted an abstemious course of life, and continued to frequent the school, of which, on the death of Xenocrates, he became the scholarch, in 315 BC.[1] His disciples included Crates of Athens, who was his eromenos,[2] and Crantor,[3] as well as Zeno of Citium[4] and Arcesilaus.[5] According to Eusebius (Chron.) he died in 270/269 BC (or possibly, as in some manuscripts, 276/275 BC). Diogenes LaŽrtius says that he died at a great age, and of natural decay.[6] Crates was his successor in the Academy.[7] Philosophy Diogenes reports that he was a close follower of Xenocrates in all things.[8] He esteemed the object of philosophy to be to exercise people in things and deeds, not in dialectic speculations;[9] his character was grave and severe;[8] and he took pride in displaying the mastery which he had acquired over emotions of every sort. In literature he most admired Homer and Sophocles, and he is said to have been the author of the remark, that Homer is an epic Sophocles, and Sophocles a tragic Homer.[6] Writings He left, according to Diogenes, several treatises, none of which were extant when the Suda was compiled. There is, however, a quotation made by Clement of Alexandria, either from him or from another philosopher of the same name, "in Concerning the Life in Accordance with Nature" (Greek: ἐν τοῖς περὶ τοῦ κατὰ φύσιν βίου),[10] and another passage,[11] upon happiness, which agrees precisely with the statement of Cicero,[12] that Polemon placed the summum bonum (highest good) in living according to the laws of nature. Polemon of Athens Polemon (2nd century BCE) was a Stoic philosopher and geographer. Of Athenian citizenship, he is known as Polemon of Athens, but he was born either in Ilium, Samos, or Sicyon, and is also known as Polemon of Ilium and Polemon Periegetes. He travelled throughout Greece, and wrote about the places he visited. He also compiled a collection of the epigrams he saw on the monuments and votive offerings. None of these works survive, but many later writers quote from them. Life Polemon was the son of Euegetes, and he was a contemporary of Aristophanes of Byzantium and Ptolemy Epiphanes.[2] He was a follower of the Stoic philosopher Panaetius. He made extensive journeys throughout Greece to collect materials for his geographical works, in the course of which he paid particular attention to the inscriptions on votive offerings and on columns, whence he obtained the surname of Stelokopas.[3] Works In his travels, Polemon collected the epigrams he found into a work On the Inscriptions to be found in Cities (Greek: Περὶ τω̂ν κατὰ πόλεις ἐπιγραμμάτων).[4] In addition, other works of his are mentioned, upon the votive offerings and monuments in the Acropolis of Athens, at Lacedaemon, at Delphi, and elsewhere, which no doubt contained copies of numerous epigrams. His works may have been a chief source of the Garland of Meleager. Athenaeus and other writers make very numerous quotations from his works. They were chiefly descriptions of different parts of Greece; some are on paintings preserved in various places, and several are controversial, among which is one against Eratosthenes. Sir James Frazer considered him the most learned of all Greek antiquaries. "His acquaintance both with the monuments and with the literature seems to have been extensive and profound. The attention which he bestowed on inscriptions earned for him the nickname of the 'monument-tapper.'"[5] Polemon of Laodicea Marcus Antonius Polemon or Antonius Polemon, also known as Polemon of Smyrna or Polemon of Laodicea (name in Greek:ο Μάρκος Αντώνιος Πολέμων, c. 90-144) was a man of sophism who lived in the 2nd century. Polemon was Anatolian Greek and originally came from a family of Roman Consular rank. He was born in Laodicea on the Lycus in Phrygia (modern Turkey), however, he spent a great part of his life in Smyrna (modern İzmir, Turkey). From early manhood, he received civic honors from the citizens of Smyrna for his services to the city. Polemon was a master rhetoric, a prominent member of the Second Sophistic. He was favored by the Roman Emperors Trajan, Hadrian and Antoninus Pius; although there is a famous story of his arrogance to Antoninus Pius, whom he threw out of his house at midnight when Antoninus was the newly arrived Governor of Asia. Polemon gave the dedicatory oration to Hadrian's Temple of Olympian Zeus in Athens. Polemon was the head of one of the foremost schools of rhetorics of the Hellenistic Culture in Smyrna. His style of oratory was imposing rather than pleasing; however his character was haughty and reserved. The only full surviving works of Polemon, was the funeral orations of the Athenians generals Callimachus and Cynaegeirus, who died at the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC. These orations are titled logoi epitaphioi (epitaphs). His rhetorical compositions were subjects that were taken from Athenian history. A treatise on physiognomy is preserved in a 14th century Arabic translation (translated into Latin by G. Hoffmann, Leipzig 1893). Polemon died from voluntary starvation in the tomb of his ancestors at Laodicea, from which he suffered from gout. He had shut himself up in the tomb to die.

Polemon in Wikipedia Polemon (or Polemo) is the name of eminent ancient Greeks: Philosophers Polemon (scholarch) Polemon (Greek: Πολέμων; d. 270/269 BC) of Athens was an eminent Platonist philosopher and Plato's third successor as scholarch or head of the Academy from 314/313 to 270/269 BC. A pupil of Xenocrates, he believed that philosophy should be practiced rather than just studied, and he placed the highest good in living according to nature. Life Polemon was the son of Philostratus, a man of wealth and political distinction. In his youth, he was extremely profligate; but one day, when he was about thirty, on his bursting into the school of Xenocrates, at the head of a band of revellers, his attention was so arrested by the discourse, which the master continued calmly in spite of the interruption, and which chanced to be upon temperance, that he tore off his garland and remained an attentive listener, and from that day he adopted an abstemious course of life, and continued to frequent the school, of which, on the death of Xenocrates, he became the scholarch, in 315 BC.[1] His disciples included Crates of Athens, who was his eromenos,[2] and Crantor,[3] as well as Zeno of Citium[4] and Arcesilaus.[5] According to Eusebius (Chron.) he died in 270/269 BC (or possibly, as in some manuscripts, 276/275 BC). Diogenes LaŽrtius says that he died at a great age, and of natural decay.[6] Crates was his successor in the Academy.[7] Philosophy Diogenes reports that he was a close follower of Xenocrates in all things.[8] He esteemed the object of philosophy to be to exercise people in things and deeds, not in dialectic speculations;[9] his character was grave and severe;[8] and he took pride in displaying the mastery which he had acquired over emotions of every sort. In literature he most admired Homer and Sophocles, and he is said to have been the author of the remark, that Homer is an epic Sophocles, and Sophocles a tragic Homer.[6] Writings He left, according to Diogenes, several treatises, none of which were extant when the Suda was compiled. There is, however, a quotation made by Clement of Alexandria, either from him or from another philosopher of the same name, "in Concerning the Life in Accordance with Nature" (Greek: ἐν τοῖς περὶ τοῦ κατὰ φύσιν βίου),[10] and another passage,[11] upon happiness, which agrees precisely with the statement of Cicero,[12] that Polemon placed the summum bonum (highest good) in living according to the laws of nature. Polemon of Athens Polemon (2nd century BCE) was a Stoic philosopher and geographer. Of Athenian citizenship, he is known as Polemon of Athens, but he was born either in Ilium, Samos, or Sicyon, and is also known as Polemon of Ilium and Polemon Periegetes. He travelled throughout Greece, and wrote about the places he visited. He also compiled a collection of the epigrams he saw on the monuments and votive offerings. None of these works survive, but many later writers quote from them. Life Polemon was the son of Euegetes, and he was a contemporary of Aristophanes of Byzantium and Ptolemy Epiphanes.[2] He was a follower of the Stoic philosopher Panaetius. He made extensive journeys throughout Greece to collect materials for his geographical works, in the course of which he paid particular attention to the inscriptions on votive offerings and on columns, whence he obtained the surname of Stelokopas.[3] Works In his travels, Polemon collected the epigrams he found into a work On the Inscriptions to be found in Cities (Greek: Περὶ τω̂ν κατὰ πόλεις ἐπιγραμμάτων).[4] In addition, other works of his are mentioned, upon the votive offerings and monuments in the Acropolis of Athens, at Lacedaemon, at Delphi, and elsewhere, which no doubt contained copies of numerous epigrams. His works may have been a chief source of the Garland of Meleager. Athenaeus and other writers make very numerous quotations from his works. They were chiefly descriptions of different parts of Greece; some are on paintings preserved in various places, and several are controversial, among which is one against Eratosthenes. Sir James Frazer considered him the most learned of all Greek antiquaries. "His acquaintance both with the monuments and with the literature seems to have been extensive and profound. The attention which he bestowed on inscriptions earned for him the nickname of the 'monument-tapper.'"[5] Polemon of Laodicea Marcus Antonius Polemon or Antonius Polemon, also known as Polemon of Smyrna or Polemon of Laodicea (name in Greek:ο Μάρκος Αντώνιος Πολέμων, c. 90-144) was a man of sophism who lived in the 2nd century. Polemon was Anatolian Greek and originally came from a family of Roman Consular rank. He was born in Laodicea on the Lycus in Phrygia (modern Turkey), however, he spent a great part of his life in Smyrna (modern İzmir, Turkey). From early manhood, he received civic honors from the citizens of Smyrna for his services to the city. Polemon was a master rhetoric, a prominent member of the Second Sophistic. He was favored by the Roman Emperors Trajan, Hadrian and Antoninus Pius; although there is a famous story of his arrogance to Antoninus Pius, whom he threw out of his house at midnight when Antoninus was the newly arrived Governor of Asia. Polemon gave the dedicatory oration to Hadrian's Temple of Olympian Zeus in Athens. Polemon was the head of one of the foremost schools of rhetorics of the Hellenistic Culture in Smyrna. His style of oratory was imposing rather than pleasing; however his character was haughty and reserved. The only full surviving works of Polemon, was the funeral orations of the Athenians generals Callimachus and Cynaegeirus, who died at the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC. These orations are titled logoi epitaphioi (epitaphs). His rhetorical compositions were subjects that were taken from Athenian history. A treatise on physiognomy is preserved in a 14th century Arabic translation (translated into Latin by G. Hoffmann, Leipzig 1893). Polemon died from voluntary starvation in the tomb of his ancestors at Laodicea, from which he suffered from gout. He had shut himself up in the tomb to die.

Polemon in Wikipedia Polemon (or Polemo) is the name of eminent ancient Greeks: Philosophers Polemon (scholarch) Polemon (Greek: Πολέμων; d. 270/269 BC) of Athens was an eminent Platonist philosopher and Plato's third successor as scholarch or head of the Academy from 314/313 to 270/269 BC. A pupil of Xenocrates, he believed that philosophy should be practiced rather than just studied, and he placed the highest good in living according to nature. Life Polemon was the son of Philostratus, a man of wealth and political distinction. In his youth, he was extremely profligate; but one day, when he was about thirty, on his bursting into the school of Xenocrates, at the head of a band of revellers, his attention was so arrested by the discourse, which the master continued calmly in spite of the interruption, and which chanced to be upon temperance, that he tore off his garland and remained an attentive listener, and from that day he adopted an abstemious course of life, and continued to frequent the school, of which, on the death of Xenocrates, he became the scholarch, in 315 BC.[1] His disciples included Crates of Athens, who was his eromenos,[2] and Crantor,[3] as well as Zeno of Citium[4] and Arcesilaus.[5] According to Eusebius (Chron.) he died in 270/269 BC (or possibly, as in some manuscripts, 276/275 BC). Diogenes LaŽrtius says that he died at a great age, and of natural decay.[6] Crates was his successor in the Academy.[7] Philosophy Diogenes reports that he was a close follower of Xenocrates in all things.[8] He esteemed the object of philosophy to be to exercise people in things and deeds, not in dialectic speculations;[9] his character was grave and severe;[8] and he took pride in displaying the mastery which he had acquired over emotions of every sort. In literature he most admired Homer and Sophocles, and he is said to have been the author of the remark, that Homer is an epic Sophocles, and Sophocles a tragic Homer.[6] Writings He left, according to Diogenes, several treatises, none of which were extant when the Suda was compiled. There is, however, a quotation made by Clement of Alexandria, either from him or from another philosopher of the same name, "in Concerning the Life in Accordance with Nature" (Greek: ἐν τοῖς περὶ τοῦ κατὰ φύσιν βίου),[10] and another passage,[11] upon happiness, which agrees precisely with the statement of Cicero,[12] that Polemon placed the summum bonum (highest good) in living according to the laws of nature. Polemon of Athens Polemon (2nd century BCE) was a Stoic philosopher and geographer. Of Athenian citizenship, he is known as Polemon of Athens, but he was born either in Ilium, Samos, or Sicyon, and is also known as Polemon of Ilium and Polemon Periegetes. He travelled throughout Greece, and wrote about the places he visited. He also compiled a collection of the epigrams he saw on the monuments and votive offerings. None of these works survive, but many later writers quote from them. Life Polemon was the son of Euegetes, and he was a contemporary of Aristophanes of Byzantium and Ptolemy Epiphanes.[2] He was a follower of the Stoic philosopher Panaetius. He made extensive journeys throughout Greece to collect materials for his geographical works, in the course of which he paid particular attention to the inscriptions on votive offerings and on columns, whence he obtained the surname of Stelokopas.[3] Works In his travels, Polemon collected the epigrams he found into a work On the Inscriptions to be found in Cities (Greek: Περὶ τω̂ν κατὰ πόλεις ἐπιγραμμάτων).[4] In addition, other works of his are mentioned, upon the votive offerings and monuments in the Acropolis of Athens, at Lacedaemon, at Delphi, and elsewhere, which no doubt contained copies of numerous epigrams. His works may have been a chief source of the Garland of Meleager. Athenaeus and other writers make very numerous quotations from his works. They were chiefly descriptions of different parts of Greece; some are on paintings preserved in various places, and several are controversial, among which is one against Eratosthenes. Sir James Frazer considered him the most learned of all Greek antiquaries. "His acquaintance both with the monuments and with the literature seems to have been extensive and profound. The attention which he bestowed on inscriptions earned for him the nickname of the 'monument-tapper.'"[5] Polemon of Laodicea Marcus Antonius Polemon or Antonius Polemon, also known as Polemon of Smyrna or Polemon of Laodicea (name in Greek:ο Μάρκος Αντώνιος Πολέμων, c. 90-144) was a man of sophism who lived in the 2nd century. Polemon was Anatolian Greek and originally came from a family of Roman Consular rank. He was born in Laodicea on the Lycus in Phrygia (modern Turkey), however, he spent a great part of his life in Smyrna (modern İzmir, Turkey). From early manhood, he received civic honors from the citizens of Smyrna for his services to the city. Polemon was a master rhetoric, a prominent member of the Second Sophistic. He was favored by the Roman Emperors Trajan, Hadrian and Antoninus Pius; although there is a famous story of his arrogance to Antoninus Pius, whom he threw out of his house at midnight when Antoninus was the newly arrived Governor of Asia. Polemon gave the dedicatory oration to Hadrian's Temple of Olympian Zeus in Athens. Polemon was the head of one of the foremost schools of rhetorics of the Hellenistic Culture in Smyrna. His style of oratory was imposing rather than pleasing; however his character was haughty and reserved. The only full surviving works of Polemon, was the funeral orations of the Athenians generals Callimachus and Cynaegeirus, who died at the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC. These orations are titled logoi epitaphioi (epitaphs). His rhetorical compositions were subjects that were taken from Athenian history. A treatise on physiognomy is preserved in a 14th century Arabic translation (translated into Latin by G. Hoffmann, Leipzig 1893). Polemon died from voluntary starvation in the tomb of his ancestors at Laodicea, from which he suffered from gout. He had shut himself up in the tomb to die.

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