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October 23    Scripture



Bible Names N-Z: Rabmag


Rabmag in Easton's Bible Dictionary Assyrian Rab-mugi, "chief physician," "who was attached to the king (Jer. 39:3, 13), the title of one of Sennacherib's officers sent with messages to Hezekiah and the people of Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17-19:13; Isa. 36:12-37:13) demanding the surrender of the city. He was accompanied by a "great army;" but his mission was unsuccessful.

Rabmag in Fausset's Bible Dictionary Jeremiah 39:3; Jeremiah 39:13. frontNERGAL SHAREZER.) Probably Magis not Magus or Magusu ("the Magi") of the Behistun inscription; the Magi had no standing in Neriglissar's time at Babylon. Emga means "priest," so Rabmag is "chief priest." The office was one of high dignity, and gave opportunities for gaining possession of the throne.

Rabmag in Hitchcock's Bible Names who overthrows or destroys a multitude

Rabmag in Naves Topical Bible -An Assyrian prince, or, possibly, a second name given to Nergal-sharezer Jer 39:3,13

Rabmag in Smiths Bible Dictionary Jer 39:3,13 a title borne by Nergal-sharezer, probably identical with the king called by the Greeks Neriglissar. [NERGAL-SHAREZER] (it probably means chief of the magi; at all events it was "an office of great power and dignity at the Babylonian court, and probably gave its possessor special facilities for gaining the throne.")

Rabmag in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE rab'-mag (rabh-magh;. Septuagint has it as a proper noun, Rhabamath): The name of one of the Babylonian princes who were present at the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, during the reign of Zedekiah, king of Judah (Jer 39:3,13). The word is a compound, the two parts seemingly being in apposition and signifying tautologically the same thing. The last syllable or section of the word, magh, was the designation among the Medes, Persians and Babylonians for priests and wise men. Its original significance was "great" or "powerful"; Greek megas, Latin magis, magnus. The first syllable, rabh, expresses practically the same idea, that of greatness, or abundance in size, quantity, or power. Thus it might be interpreted the "allwise" or "all-powerful" prince, the chief magician or physician. It is, therefore, a title and not a name, and is accordingly put in appositive relations to the proper name just preceding, as "Nergal-sharezer, the Rab-mag," translated fully, "Nergal-sharezer the chief prince or magician." See NERGAL-SHAREZER. In harmony with the commonly accepted view, the proper rendering of the text should be, "All the princes of the king of Babylon came in, and sat in the middle gate, to wit, Nergal-sharezer, Samgarnebo, Sarsechim, (the) Rab-saris, Nergal-sharezer, (the) Rab-mag" (Jer 39:3); and "so Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard sent, and Nebushazban, (the) Rab-saris, and Nergal-sharezer, (the) Rab-mag, and all the chief officers of the king of Babylon" (Jer 39:13). Walter G. Clippinger

Rabmag in Wikipedia Rabmag is the name of two figures in the Bible: The Assyrian "Rab-mugi" a "chief physician" who was attached to the king of Babylon (Jeremiah 39:3,13). The title of one of Sennacherib's officers sent with messages to Hezekiah and the people of Jerusalem demanding the surrender of the city. He was accompanied by a "great army;" but his mission was unsuccessful (II Kings 18:17-19:13 and Isaiah 36:12-37:13).

Rabmag Scripture - Jeremiah 39:13 So Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard sent, and Nebushasban, Rabsaris, and Nergalsharezer, Rabmag, and all the king of Babylon's princes;

Rabmag Scripture - Jeremiah 39:3 And all the princes of the king of Babylon came in, and sat in the middle gate, [even] Nergalsharezer, Samgarnebo, Sarsechim, Rabsaris, Nergalsharezer, Rabmag, with all the residue of the princes of the king of Babylon.

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