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Bible Names A-G: Antipas


Antipas in Easton's Bible Dictionary (1.) Herod Antipas, a son of Herod the Great by his Samaritan wife Malthace. He was tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea during the whole period of our Lord's life on earth (Luke 23:7). He was a frivolous and vain prince, and was chargeable with many infamous crimes (Mark 8:15; Luke 3:19; 13:31, 32). He beheaded John the Baptist (Matt. 14:1-12) at the instigation of Herodias, the wife of his half-brother Herod-Philip, whom he had married. Pilate sent Christ to him when he was at Jerusalem at the Passover (Luke 23:7). He asked some idle questions of him, and after causing him to be mocked, sent him back again to Pilate. The wife of Chuza, his house-steward, was one of our Lord's disciples (Luke 8:3). (2.) A "faithful martyr" (Rev. 2:13), of whom nothing more is certainly known.

Antipas in Fausset's Bible Dictionary A martyr faithful unto death at Pergamos (Revelation 2:13). "I know ... where thou dwellest, even where Satan's seat is" (the idol AEsculapius was worshipped there under the serpent form); "and thou holdest fast My name, and hast not denied My faith, even in those days wherein Antipas was My faithful martyr, who was slain among you, where Satan dwelleth." Satan, the old serpent, instigated the idol's devotees, through the magistrates at Pergamos, to slay Antipas. Compare Revelation 2:10; Revelation 12:1-17.

Antipas in Hitchcock's Bible Names for all

Antipas in Naves Topical Bible A martyr Re 2:13

Antipas in Smiths Bible Dictionary (like the father), martyr at Pergamos, Re 2:13 and according to tradition the bishop of that place. (A.D. before 100.)

Antipas in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE an'-ti-pas (Antipas): The name is an abbreviation of Antipater: (1) A name of Herod "the tetrarch" (in Jos), son of Herod the Great, the brother of Archelaus (Mt 14:1; Lk 3:1; 9:7; Acts 13:1). See HEROD. (2) A martyr of the church of Pergamum, described as "my witness, my faithful one" (Rev 2:13).

Antipas of Pergamum in Wikipedia is referred to in the Book of Revelation (Revelation 2:13) as the "faithful martyr" of Pergamon. According to Christian tradition, John the Apostle ordained Antipas as bishop of the Pergamon during the reign of the Roman emperor Domitian. The traditional account goes on to say Antipas was martyred in ca. 92 AD by burning in a brazen bull-shaped altar used for casting out demons worshiped by the local population. There is a tradition of oil ("manna of the saints") being secreted from the relics of Saint Antipas.[3] On the calendars of Eastern Christianity, the feast day of Antipas is April 11. Some Christians pray to this saint for ailments of the teeth...

Antipas Scripture - Revelation 2:13 I know thy works, and where thou dwellest, [even] where Satan's seat [is]: and thou holdest fast my name, and hast not denied my faith, even in those days wherein Antipas [was] my faithful martyr, who was slain among you, where Satan dwelleth.

Herod Antipas in Wikipedia (short for Antipatros) (before 20 BC after 39 AD) was a first century AD ruler of Galilee and Perea, who bore the title of tetrarch ("ruler of a quarter"). He is best known today for accounts in the New Testament of his role in events that led to the executions of John the Baptist and Jesus of Nazareth, and through their portrayal in modern media, such as film. After inheriting his territories when the kingdom of his father Herod the Great was divided upon his death in 4 BC, Antipas ruled them as a client state of the Roman Empire. He was responsible for building projects at Sepphoris and Betharamphtha, and more important for the construction of his capital Tiberias on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee. Named in honor of his patron, the emperor Tiberius, the city later became a center of rabbinic learning. Antipas divorced his first wife Phasaelis, the daughter of King Aretas IV of Nabatea, in favour of Herodias, who had formerly been married to his brother Herod Philip I. According to the New Testament Gospels, it was John the Baptist's condemnation of this arrangement that led Antipas to have him arrested; John was subsequently put to death. The Gospel of Luke states that when Jesus was brought before Pontius Pilate for trial, Pilate handed him over to Antipas, in whose territory Jesus had been active. However, Antipas sent him back to Pilate. The legal basis for these events, and the very historicity of Antipas' involvement in the trial, have been the subject of scholarly debate. Besides provoking his conflict with the Baptist, the tetrarch's divorce added a personal grievance to previous disputes with Aretas over territory on the border of Perea and Nabatea. The result was a war that proved disastrous for Antipas; a Roman counter-offensive was ordered by Tiberius, but abandoned upon that emperor's death in 37 AD. In 39 AD Antipas was accused by his nephew Agrippa I of conspiracy against the new Roman emperor Caligula, who sent him into exile in Gaul. Accompanied there by Herodias, he died at an unknown date...

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