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August 21    Scripture



Bible Names A-G: Alphaeus


Alphaeus in Easton's Bible Dictionary (1.) The father of James the Less, the apostle and writer of the epistle (Matt. 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15; Acts 1:13), and the husband of Mary (John 19:25). The Hebrew form of this name is Cleopas, or Clopas (q.v.). (2.) The father of Levi, or Matthew (Mark 2:14).

Alphaeus in Fausset's Bible Dictionary Father of James the Less, the apostle, and writer of the epistle, and "brother (i.e. cousin) of our Lord" (Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15; Acts 1:13); also of Joses (Mark 15:40). Husband of the Mary who with Jesus' mother stood at the cross (John 19:25). The same as Clopas (as it should be written, not Cleophas), both names being Greek variations of Hebrew Chalpai, or Hhalpai. Possibly the Cleopas of Luke 24:18. If the translation Luke 6:16 be correct, "Jude, brother of James," Alphaeus was his father also. In Mark 2:14 Levi (Matthew) is called the son of Alphaeus. Whether he be the same is not certain: probably not.

Alphaeus in Naves Topical Bible 1. Father of James Mt 10:3; Mr 3:18 -2. Father of Levi Mr 2:14

Alphaeus in Smiths Bible Dictionary (changing) the father of the apostle James the Less, Mt 10:3; Mr 3:18; Lu 6:15; Ac 1:13 and husband of Mary. Joh 19:25 [MARY] In this latter place he is called Clopas (not, as in the Authorized Version, Cleophas).

Alphaeus in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE al-fe'-us (Alphaios; Westcott and Hort, The New Testament in Greek, Halphaios): (1) The father of the second James in the list of the apostles (Mt 10:3; Mk 3:18; Lk 6:15; Acts 1:13). (2) The father of Levi, the publican (Mk 2:14). Levi is designated as Matthew in the Gospel of Mt (9:9). There is no other reference to this Alpheus. Some writers, notably Weiss, identify the father of Levi with the father of the second James. He says that James and Levi were undoubtedly brothers; but that seems improbable. If they were brothers they would quite likely be associated as are James and John, Andrew and Peter. Chrysostom says James and Levi had both been tax-gatherers before they became followers of Jesus. This tradition would not lend much weight as proof that they were brothers, for it might arise through identifying the two names, and the western manuscripts do identify them and read James instead of Levi in Mk 2:14. This, however, is undoubtedly a corruption of the text. If it had been the original it would be difficult to explain the substitution of an unknown Levi for James who is well known. Many writers identify Alpheus, the father of the second James, with Clopas of Jn 19:25. This had early become a tradition, and Chrysostom believed they were the same person. This identity rests on four suppositions, all of which are doubtful: (a) That the Mary of Clopas was the same as the Mary who was the mother of the second James. There is a difference of opinion as to whether "Mary of Clopas" should be understood to be the wife of Clopas or the daughter of Clopas, but the former is more probable. We know from Mt 27:56 and Mk 15:40 that there was a James who was the son of Mary, and that this Mary belonged to that little group of women that was near Jesus it the time of the crucifixion. It is quite likely that this Mary is the one referred to in Jn 19:25. That would make James, the son of Mary of Mt 27:56, the son of Mary of Clopas. But Mary was such a common name In the New Testament that this supposition cannot be proven. (b) That the James, who was the son of Mary, was the same person as the James, the son of Alpheus. Granting the supposition under (a), this would not prove the identity of Clopas and Alpheus unless this supposition can also be proven, but it seems impossible to either prove it or disprove it. (c) That Alpheus and Clopas are different variations of a common original, and that the variation has arisen from different pronunciations of the first letter ("ch") of the Aramaic original. There are good scholars who both support and deny this theory. (d) That Clopas had two names as was common at that time; but there is nothing to either substantiate or disprove this theory. See CLOPAS. It seems impossible to determine absolutely whether or not Alpheus, the father of the second James, and Clopas of Jn 19:25 are the same person, but it is quite probable that they are.

Alphaeus in Wikipedia is mentioned in the New Testament as the father of three of the Twelve Apostles, namely: Matthew Levi the Apostle James, son of Alphaeus Jude Thaddaeus the Apostle As the father of an Apostle James, he has been confused with Clopas, who through his wife Mary is thought by some to have been stepfather to James the Less (John 19:25 ). He and Clopas were both Zaddikite priests related to Zechariah the father of John the Baptist according to the Church fathers. This identification, and the problem arising from it, is explained by the Catholic Encyclopedia: "This name, Clopas, is thought by many to be the Greek transliteration of an Aramaic Alphaeus. This view is based on the identification of Mary, the mother of James etc. (Mark, xv, 40) with Mary, the wife of Clopas, and the consequent identity of Alphaeus, father of James (Mark, iii, 18), with Clopas. Etymologically, however, the identification of the two names offers serious difficulties: (1) Although the letter Heth is occasionally rendered in Greek by Kappa at the end and in the middle of words, it is very seldom so in the beginning, where the aspirate is better protected; examples of this, however, are given by Levy (Sem. Fremdwörter in Griech.); but (2) even if this difficulty was met, Clopas would suppose an Aramaic Halophai, not Halpai. (3) The Syriac versions have rendered the Greek Clopas with a Qoph, not with a Heth, as they would have done naturally had they been conscious of the identity of Clopas and Halpai; Alphaeus is rendered with Heth (occasionally Aleph). For these reasons, others see in Clopas a substitute for Cleopas, with the contraction of eo into w. In Greek, it is true, eo is not contracted into w, but a Semite, borrowing a name did not necessarily follow the rules of Greek contraction. In fact, in Mishnic Hebrew the name Cleopatra is rendered by Clopatra, and hence the Greek Cleopas might be rendered by Clopas. See also, Chabot, "Journ. Asiat.", X, 327 (1897). Even if, etymologically, the two names are different they may have been borne by one name, and the question of the identity of Alphaeus and Clopas is still open." [1] There may have been two separate men named Alphaeus. Though both Matthew and James are described as being the "son of Alphaeus" there is no Biblical account of the two being called brothers, even in the same context where John and James or Peter and Andrew are described as being brothers. There is also an Alphaeus named as the father of Levi: And as he passed by, he saw Levi the son of Alphaeus sitting at the tax booth, and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he rose and followed him. —Mark 2:14

Alphaeus Scripture - Acts 1:13 And when they were come in, they went up into an upper room, where abode both Peter, and James, and John, and Andrew, Philip, and Thomas, Bartholomew, and Matthew, James [the son] of Alphaeus, and Simon Zelotes, and Judas [the brother] of James.

Alphaeus Scripture - Luke 6:15 Matthew and Thomas, James the [son] of Alphaeus, and Simon called Zelotes,

Alphaeus Scripture - Mark 2:14 And as he passed by, he saw Levi the [son] of Alphaeus sitting at the receipt of custom, and said unto him, Follow me. And he arose and followed him.

Alphaeus Scripture - Mark 3:18 And Andrew, and Philip, and Bartholomew, and Matthew, and Thomas, and James the [son] of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus, and Simon the Canaanite,

Alphaeus Scripture - Matthew 10:3 Philip, and Bartholomew; Thomas, and Matthew the publican; James [the son] of Alphaeus, and Lebbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus;

Alpheus in Hitchcock's Bible Names a thousand; learned; chief

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