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November 15    Scripture



Bible Cities: Paphos
Ancient Paphos

Map of Ancient Paphos


Paphos in Easton's Bible Dictionary the capital of the island of Cyprus, and therefore the residence of the Roman governor. It was visited by Paul and Barnabas on their first missionary tour (Acts 13:6). It is new Paphos which is here meant. It lay on the west coast of the island, about 8 miles north of old Paphos. Its modern name is Baffa.

Paphos in Fausset's Bible Dictionary A town in the western end of Cyprus, as Salamis was in the E. Paul passed through the isle from Salamis to Paphos (Acts 13:6-13.) Here Barnabas and Saul were instrumental in converting Sergius Paulus the proconsul, in spite of Elymas' opposition. (See ELYMAS.) Saul is here called Paul when "filled with the Holy Spirit" he inflicted blindness from "the hand of the Lord" upon the sorcerer, and thenceforth became more prominent than Barnabas. Here Aphrodite or Venus was said to have risen from the foam of the sea. The harbor and town were at new Paphos, her temple at old Paphos.

Paphos in Hitchcock's Bible Names which boils

Paphos in Naves Topical Bible (A city of Cyprus) -Paul blinds a sorcerer in Ac 13:6-13

Paphos in Smiths Bible Dictionary (boiling, or hot), a town at the west end of Cyprus, connected by a react with Salamis at the east end. It was founded B.C. 1184 (during the period of the judges in Israel). Paul and Barnabas travelled, on their first missionary expedition, "through the isle" from the latter place to the former, Ac 13:6 The great characteristic of Paphos was the worship of Aphrodite or Venus, who was fabled to have here risen from the sea. Her temple, however, was at "Old Paphos" now called Kuklia. The harbor and the chief town were at "New Paphos," ten miles to the northwest. The place is still called Baffa.

Paphos in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE pa'-fos: 1. Site: The name of two towns, Old (Palaia Paphos, or Palaipaphos) and New Paphos Nea Paphos), situated at the southwestern extremity of Cyprus. Considerable confusion is caused by the use of the single name Paphos in ancient writers to denote now one, now the other, of these cities. That referred to in Acts 13:6,13 is strictly called New Paphos (modern Baffa), and lay on the coast about a mile South of the modern Ktima and some 10 miles Northwest of the old city. The latter (modern Kouklia) is situated on an eminence more than a mile from the sea, on the left bank of the Diarrizo, probably the ancient Bocarus. 2. History of Old Paphos: It was founded by Cinyras, the father of Adonis, or, according to another legend, by Aerias, and formed the capital of the most important kingdom in Cyprus except that of Salamis. Its territory embraced a considerable portion of Western Cyprus, extending northward to that of Soli, southward to that of Curium and eastward to the range of Troodus. Among its last kings was Nicocles, who ruled shortly after the death of Alexander the Great. In 310 BC Nicocreon of Salamis, who had been set over the whole of Cyprus by Ptolemy I of Egypt, was forced to put an end to his life at Paphos for plotting with Antigonus (Diodorus xx. 21, who wrongly gives the name as Nicocles; see Athenische Mitteilungen, XXII, 203 ff), and from that time Paphos remained under Egyptian rule until the Roman annexation of Cyprus in 58 BC. The growth of New Paphos brought with it the decline of the old city, which was also ruined by successive earthquakes. Yet its temple still retained much of its old fame, and in 69 AD Titus, the future emperor of Rome, turned aside on his journey to Jerusalem, which he was to capture in the following year, to visit the sacred shrine and to inquire of the priests into the fortune which awaited him (Tacitus History ii.2-4; Suetonius Titus 5). 3. History of New Paphos: New Paphos, originally the seaport of the old town, was founded, according to tradition, by Agapenor of Arcadia (Iliad ii.609; Pausan. viii.5, 2). Its possession of a good harbor secured its prosperity, and it had several rich temples. According to Dio Cassius (liv.23) it was restored by Augustus in 15 BC after a destructive earthquake and received the name Augusta (Greek Sebaste). Under the Roman Empire it was the administrative capital of the island and the seat of the governor. The extant remains all date from this period and include those of public buildings, private houses, city walls and the moles of the harbor. 4. The Temple and Cult:...

Paphos Scripture - Acts 13:13 Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem.

Paphos Scripture - Acts 13:6 And when they had gone through the isle unto Paphos, they found a certain sorcerer, a false prophet, a Jew, whose name [was] Barjesus:

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