Map of the Roman Empire - Tripolis

Tripolis
Q-8 on the Map

Tripolis - Hellenistic city in the maritime district of Phoenicia, formed from three older cities on the coast of Syria: Tyre, Sidon and Arados. Modern Lebanese city of Tripoli.

Tripŏlis (Τρίπολις). Now Tripoli, Tarabulus; on the coast of Phœnicia, consisted of three distinct cities, one stadium (600 feet) apart, each having its own walls, but all united in a common constitution, having one place of assembly, and forming in reality one city. They were colonies of Tyre, Sidon, and Aradus respectively. - Harry Thurston Peck. Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. New York. Harper and Brothers.

Tripolis (Greek: Τρίπολις; meaning "three cities") was a maritime district in ancient Phoenicia. The center of the confederation of the three Phoenician cities of Tyre, Sidon, and Aradus. Through the ages, it evolved to become the present Lebanese city of Tripoli.

Tripoli (Standard Arabic: طرابلس Ṭarābulus, and Arabic: طَرَابُلُس‎  Trāblous, Greek: Τρίπολις Tripolis) is a city in Lebanon. Situated north of Batroun and the cape of Lithoprosopon, Tripoli is the capital of the North Governorate and the Tripoli District (in Lebanon the districts are subunits of governorates). The city is located 85 km north of the capital Beirut, and is the easternmost port of Lebanon. In ancient times, it was the center of a Phoenician confederation which included Tyre, Sidon and Arados, hence the name Tripoli, meaning "triple city" in Greek. Later, it was controlled successively by the Assyrian Empire, Persian Empire, Roman Empire, the Byzantine Empire, the Caliphate, the Seljuk Empire, Crusader States, the Mamluks, the Ottoman Empire and France. Tripoli had a number of different names as far back as the Phoenician age. In the Amarna letters the name "Derbly" was mentioned, and in other places "Ahlia" or "Wahlia" are mentioned (14th century BC). In an engraving concerning the invasion of Tripoli by the Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II (888-859 BC), it is called Mahallata or Mahlata, Mayza, and Kayza. Under the Phoenicians, the name Athar was used to refer to Tripoli. When the Greeks settled in the city they called it "Tripoli", meaning "three cities".

Ancient History of Tripolis. There is evidence of settlement in Tripoli that dates back as early as 1400 BC. In the 9th century BC, the Phoenicians established a trading station in Tripoli and later, under Persian rule, the city became the center of a confederation of the Phoenician city states of Sidon, Tyre, and Arados Island. Under Hellenistic rule, Tripoli was used as a naval shipyard and the city enjoyed a period of autonomy. It came under Roman rule around 64 BC. In 551, an earthquake and tidal wave destroyed the Byzantine city of Tripoli along with other Mediterranean coastal cities. During the Roman and Byzantine periods, Tripoli witnessed the construction of important public buildings including municipal stadium or gymnasium due to strategic position of the city midway on the imperial coastal highway leading from Antioch to Ptolemais. In addition, Tripoli retained the same configuration of three distinct and administratively independent quarters (Aradians, Sidonians, and Tyrians). The territory outside the city was divided between the three quarters. - Wikipedia

Tripolis (Tripolitana), A maritime district of Phoenicia, comprehending the territories of the three towns, Tyre, Sidon, and Aradus. - Classical Gazetteer

Map of the Roman Empire (Click to Enlarge)

Large Map of the Roman Empire (Clickable Locations)

The Roman Empire During the First Century AD

Maps are essential for any serious study, they help students of Roman history understand the geographical locations and historical backgrounds of the places mentioned in historical sources.

Map of New Testament Israel  |  Map of Old Testament Israel

Map of the Roman Empire  |  Bible History Online

Tripolis
TRI“POLIS (Τρίπολις, Ptol. 5.15.4: Eth. Τριπολίτης: Adj. Tripoliticus, Plin. Nat. 14.7. s. 9), an important maritime town of Phoenicia, situated on the N. side of the promontory of Theuprosopon. (Strab. xvi. p.754.) The site of Tripolis has been already described, and it has been mentioned that it derived its name, which literally signifies the three cities, from its being the metropolis of the three confederate towns, Tyre, Sidon, and Aradus [PHOENICIA, Vol. II. p. 606]. Each of those cities had here its peculiar quarter, separated from the rest by a wall. Tripolis possessed a good harbour, and, like the rest of the Phoenician towns, had a large maritime commerce. (Cf. Joannes Phocas, 100.4; Wesseling, ad Itin. Ant., p. 149.) Respecting the modern Tripoli (Tarablus or Tripoli di Soria); see Pococke, vol. ii. p. 146, seq.; Maundrell, p. 26; Burckhardt, p. 163, seq., &c.; cf. Scylax, p. 42; Mela, 1.12; Plin. Nat. 5.20. s. 17; Diod. 16.41; Steph. B. sub voce Eckhel, vol. iii. p. 372.) - Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) William Smith, LLD, Ed.

 

Map of the Roman Empire (Click to Enlarge)

Large Map of the Roman Empire (Clickable Locations)

The Roman Empire During the First Century AD

Maps are essential for any serious study, they help students of Roman history understand the geographical locations and historical backgrounds of the places mentioned in historical sources.

Map of New Testament Israel  |  Map of Old Testament Israel

Map of the Roman Empire  |  Bible History Online



Map of the Roman Empire - Places

Places

3-Taverns

Abydos

Achaea

Actium

Adramyttium

Aegean Sea

Aegyptus

Africa

Agrigentum

Alexandria

Alla

Alps

Amasea

Amastris

Amisus

Amphipolis

Ancona

Ancyra

Antiium

Antioch

Apamea

Apollonia

Appennines

Aquitania

Arabian Desert

Ariminum

Arretium

Asia

Athens

Attalia

Baetica

Balearic Islands

Belgica

Beroea

Berytus

Bononia

Burdigala

Byzantium

Caesarea

Caesarea Philippi

Canopus

Cappadocia

Capri

Carchemish

Carthage

Cenchreae

Chios

Cilicia

Cnidus

Colossae

Comana

Corduba

Corinth

Corsica

Creta

Cyrenaica

Cyrene

Cyzicus

Dacia

Damascus

Danube River

Delphi

Derbe

Dniester River

Douro River

Dyrrhachium

Ebro River

Edessa

Emerita Augusta

Emesa

Ephesus

Epiphania

Euphrates River

Fair Havens

Florentia

Forum Appius

Gades

Galatia

Gallia

Gangra

Garonne River

Gaza

Genua

Germania

Gordium

Greater Syrtis

Guadalquivir River

Guadiana River

Halicarnassus

Halys River

Haran

Heliopolis

Heraclea Pontus

Hippo Regius

Hispalis

Hispania

Iconium

Illyricum

Istros

Italia

Jerusalem

Joppa

Jordan River

Judaea

Kure Mountains

Laodicea

Larissa

Lasea

Leptis Magna

Lesser Syritis

Luca

Loire River

Lugdunensis

Lusitania

Lycia

Lystra

Macedonia

Magnesia

Malta

Massilia

Mauritania Caesariensis

Mauritania Tingitana

Mazaca

Mediterranean Sea

Memphis

Messana

Messembria

Miletus

Moesia

Mount Sinai

Myra

Nabataean Kingdom

Narbonensis

Naucratis

Neapolis

Nemausus

Nicaea

Nicephorium

Nicomedia

Nicopolis

Nile River

Numidia

Oceanus Atlanticus

Odessus

Oea

Orontes River

Paestum

Palmyra

Pannonia

Panormus

Paphos

Patara

Patmos

Pelusium

Perga

Pergamum

Perusia

Pessinus

Petra

Philadelphia

Philippi

Philippopolis

Phoenix

Po River

Pola

Pompeii

Pontus Euxinus

Porta Veneris

Prusa

Prut River

Ptolemais

Puteoli

Pyrenees

Ravenna

Rhodes

Rome

Sabratha

Sahara Desert

Sais

Salamis

Salmone

Salonae

Samaria

Samosata

Saonne River

Sardinia

Sardis

Sarmatia

Scodra

Scythians

Sea of Adria

Seine River

Sicilia

Side

Sidon

Sinope

Sinus Arabicus

Siscia

Smyrna

Sparta

Syracuse

Syria

Tagus River

Tarraco

Tarraconensis

Tarsus

Taurus Mountains

Terracini

Thapsus

Thayatira

Thebes

Thessalonica

Thrace

Tiber River

Tiberias

Tisza River

Tomi

Trapezus

Tripolis

Troas

Tyre

Utica

Valentia

Zeugma