Map of the Roman Empire - Perga

Perga
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Ancient Perga An ancient Greek city of Pamphilia in Anatolia.  Perga was mentioned in the Bible in the Book of Acts. The city was visited by Paul, Acts 13:13, 14 and Acts 14:25.

Acts 13:13 - Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem.

Acts 13:14 -But when they departed from Perga, they came to Antioch in Pisidia, and went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and sat down.

Perga (Πέργη). An ancient and important city of Pamphylia, a little inland, northeast of Attalia, between the rivers Catarrhactes and Cestrus, sixty stadia (six geographical miles) from the mouth of the former. It was a celebrated seat of the worship of Artemis. It was the first place in Asia Minor visited by the Apostle Paul on his first missionary journey (Acts, xiii. 13). - Harry Thurston Peck. Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. New York. Harper and Brothers. 1898.

Perga (Greek: Πέργη Perge, Turkish: Perge) was an ancient Greek city in Anatolia and the capital of Pamphylia, now in Antalya province on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the coastal plain. Located there is an acropolis dating back to the Bronze Age. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable for being the home of the renowned ancient Greek mathematician Apollonius of Perga.

History of Perga. In the twelfth century BC, there was a large wave of Greek migration from northern Anatolia to the Mediterranean coast. Many settled in the area immediately east of the area of modern-day Antalya, which came to be known as Pamphylia, meaning "land of all tribes". Four great cities eventually rose to prominence in Pamphylia: Perga, Sillyon, Aspendos and Side. Perga itself was founded in around 1000 BC and is nearly 20 kilometres (12 mi) inland. It was sited inland as a defensive measure in order to avoid the pirate bands that terrorized this stretch of the Mediterranean. In 546 BC, the Achaemenid Persians defeated the local powers and gained control of the region. Two hundred years later, in 333 BC, the armies of Alexander the Great arrived in Perga during his war of conquest against the Persians. The citizens of Perga sent out guides to lead his army into the city. Alexander's was followed by the diadoch empire of the Seleucids, under whom Perga's most celebrated ancient inhabitant, the mathematician Apollonius (c.262 BC c.190 BC), lived and worked. Apollonius was a pupil of Archimedes and wrote a series of eight books describing a family of curves known as conic sections, comprising the circle, ellipse, parabola and hyperbola. Roman rule began in 188 BC, and most of the surviving ruins today date from this period. After the collapse of the Roman Empire, Perga remained inhabited until Seljuk times, before being gradually abandoned. - Wikipedia

 

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PERGE
PERGE or PERGA (?????: Eth. ?e??a???), an ancient and important city of Pamphylia, between the rivers Catarrhactes and Cestrus, at a distance of 60 stadia from the mouth of the latter. (Strab. xiv. p.667; Plin. Nat. 5.26; Pomp. Mel. 1.14; Ptol. 5.5.7.) It was renowned for the worship of Artemis, whose temple stood on a hill outside the town, and in whose honour annual festivals were celebrated. (Strab. l.c.; Callim. Hymn. in Dian. 187; Scylax, p. 39; Dionys. Per. 854.) The coins of Perge represent both the goddess and her temple. Alexander the Great occupied Perge with a part of his army after quitting Phaselis, between which two towns the road is described as long and difficult (Arrian, Arr. Anab. 1.26; comp. Plb. 5.72, 22.25; Liv. 38.37.) We learn from the Acts of the Apostles (14.24, 25) that Paul and Barnabas preached the gospel at Perge. (Comp. Acts, 13.13.) In the ecclesiastical notices and in Hierocles (p. 679) Perge appears as the metropolis of Pamphylia. (Comp. Steph. B. sub voce Eckhel, Doctr. Num. 1.3, p. 12.) There are considerable ruins of Perge about 16 miles to the north-east of Adalia, at a place now called Eski-Kalesi. (Comp. Leake, Asia Minor, p. 132; Texier, Descript. de l'Asie Min., where the ruins are figured in 19 plates; Fellows, Asia Minor, p. 190, &c.)  - Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) William Smith, LLD, Ed.

 

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