Map of the Roman Empire - Cenchreae

Cenchreae
L-6 on the Map

Ancient Cenchreae (Modern Kechries) Cenchreae was an ancient harbor city of Corinth. It was mentioned in the Bible in Acts 18:18; Rom. 16:1. Paul the Apostle visited Cenchreae Acts 18:18. Also is contained a a Christian church, of which Phoebe was a servant or deaconess Rom. 16:1.

Cenchreae CEŽNCHREAE (Κεγχρεαί: Eth. Κεγχρεάτης). The eastern port of Corinth. - Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. New York. Harper and Brothers.

Acts 18:18 - And Paul [after this] tarried [there] yet a good while, and then took his leave of the brethren, and sailed thence into Syria, and with him Priscilla and Aquila; having shorn [his] head in Cenchrea: for he had a vow.

Romans 16:1 - I commend unto you Phebe our sister, which is a servant of the church which is at Cenchrea:

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Cenchreae (Κεγχρέαι). The eastern harbour of Corinth on the Saronic Gulf, important for its trade and commerce with the East. - Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, William Smith, LLD, Ed.

Cenchreae Kechries (Greek - Modern: Κεχριές, rarely Κεχρεές, Ancient/Katharevousa: Kenchreai - Κεγχρεαί) is a community in the municipality of Corinth in Corinthia in Greece. It is located about 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) southwest of Corinth and 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) southeast of the Epidavros interchange with GR-8A/E94, north of Galataki and Kato Almyri, east of Examilia, southeast of Xylokeriza, south of Kiras Vrysi and west/southwest of modern Isthmia...

History. In ancient times, Kenchreai was one of the two ports of the inland city-state of Corinth. While Kenchreai served the eastern trade routes, Lechaion on the Corinthian Gulf served the trade routes leading west to Italy and the rest of Europe. SItuated on the eastern side of the Isthmus of Corinth, Kenchreai sat at a natural crossroads for ships arriving from the east and overland traffic heading north and south between central Greece and the Peloponnese. The origin of Kenchreai is unknown, but it must have been inhabited from early times, probably in prehistory, on account of the deep natural harbor that was favorable for landing ships. The area is endowed with abundant water sources, a massive bedrock of oolitic limestone that excellent building stone, and several defensible positions with good viewpoints. The name of the site seems to derive from the ancient Greek word for millet, and the area's capacity for agricultural production is still evident.

The earliest textual sources for Kenchreai, an epitaph of the Late Archaic period (late 6th-early 5th century BC) and references in historical and geographical writings of the Classical to Hellenistic eras (5th-2nd centuries BCE), reveal that there was a permanent settlement and a fortified naval station. Few archaeological remains survive from this early settlement, but it seems to have been located westward form the modern coast, along the prominent ridge that borders the modern village to the north.

Kenchreai flourished during the Roman Empire, when the settlement was focused around the crescent-shaped harbor enclosed by massive concrete breakwaters and protected by sea-walls. The local community was small but prosperous, and it was distinguished by its social, cultural, and religious diversity. Ancient literature and inscriptions from the site attest to the presence of cults of Aphrodite, Isis, Asklepios, Poseidon, Dionysos, and Pan. Christianity also arrived at Kenchreai early in the religion's history. According to Acts 18:18, the Apostle Paul stopped at Kenchreai during his second missionary journey, where he had his hair cut to fulfill a vow. He mentions the place and a deaconess named Phoebe in the local assembly in his epistle to the Romans (Romans 16:1). A later ecclesiastical tradition recorded the existence of a bishop at Kenchreai, but the veracity of these accounts is hard to establish.  - Wikipedia

 

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