Map of the Roman Empire - Caesarea Philippi

Caesarea Philippi
Q-9 on the Map

Ancient Caesarea Philippi (Paneas): Caesarea Philippi was a capital city founded by Philip the tetrarch, son of Herod the Great. It was located near the foot of Mount Paneus, and the springs of the Jordan River. Today Paneas is no longer inhabited. Caesarea is mentioned in the Bible in Matthew 16:13; and Mark 8:27.

Matt. 16:13 - When Jesus came into the coasts of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, saying, Whom do men say that I the Son of man am?

Mark 8:27 -And Jesus went out, and his disciples, into the towns of Caesarea Philippi: and by the way he asked his disciples, saying unto them, Whom do men say that I am?

Caesarea Philippi Caesarea (Καισάρεια). Caesarēa Philippi, a town on the northern confines of Palestine, in the district of Trachonitis, at the foot of Mount Paneus, and near the springs of the Jordan. It was also called Leshem, Laish, Dan, and Paneas. The name Paneas is supposed to have been given it by the Phśnicians. The appellation of Dan was given to it by the tribe of that name, because the portion assigued to them was “too little for them,” and they therefore “went up to fight against Leshem (or Laish, Judg. xviii. 29), and took it,” calling it “Dan, after the name of Dan, their father” (Josh. xix. 47). Eusebius and Jerome distinguish Dan from Paneas as if they were different places, though near each other; but most writers consider them as one place, and even Jerome himself, on Ezek. xlviii., says that Dan or Leshem was afterwards called Paneas. Philip, the tetrarch, rebuilt it, or at least embellished and enlarged it, and named it Caesarea, in honour of the emperor Tiberius; and afterwards Agrippa, in compliment to Nero, called it Neronias.  - Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. New York. Harper and Brothers.

Map of the Roman Empire (Click to Enlarge)

Large Map of the Roman Empire (Clickable Locations)

The Roman Empire During the First Century AD

Maps are essential for any serious study, they help students of Roman history understand the geographical locations and historical backgrounds of the places mentioned in historical sources.

Map of New Testament Israel  |  Map of Old Testament Israel

Map of the Roman Empire  |  Bible History Online

Caesarea Philippi  PANEAS
PANEAS, PANIAS, or PANEIAS (Πανεάς, Πανιάς, Πανειάς, Hierocl. p. 716), more usually called either CAESAREIA PANEAS (Καισάρεια Πανεάς or Πανιάς, J. AJ 18.2.3, B. Jud. 2.9.1; Ptol. 5.15.21; Plin. Nat. 5.15. s. 15; Sozom. 5.21; on coins, K. ὑπὸ Πανείῳ and πρὸς Πανείῳ; in Steph. B. sub voce incorrectly πρὸς πῇ Πανεάδι) or CAESAREIA PHILIPPI (K. ἡ Φιλίππου, Matth. 16.13; Mark, 8.27; J. AJ 20.8.4, B. J. 3.8.7, 2.1; Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 7.17), a city in the north of Palestine, called by Ptolemy and Hierocles (ll. cc.) a city of Phoenicia, situated upon one of the sources of the Jordan, at the foot of Mt. Panium, one of the branches of Lebanon. Mt Panium contained a cave sacred to Pan, whence it derived its name. (Philostorg. 7.7.) At this spot Herod erected a temple in honour of Augustus. (J. AJ 15.10.3, B. J. 1.21.3.) Paneas was supposed by many to have been the town of Laish, afterwards called Dan; but Eusebius and Jerome state that they were separate cities, distant 4 miles from each other. (Reland, Palaestina, p. 918, seq.) Paneas was rebuilt by Philip the Tetrarch, who called it Caesareia in honour of the Roman emperor, and gave it the surname of Philippi to distinguish it from the other Caesareia in Palestine. (J. AJ 18.2.3, B. J. 2.9.1.) It was subsequently called Neronias by Herod Agrippa in honour of the emperor Nero. (J. AJ 20.8.4; Coins.) According to ecclesiastical tradition it was the residence of the women diseased with an issue of blood. (Matth. 9.20; Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 7.18; Sozom. 5.21; Theoph. Chronogr. 41 ; Phot. cod. 271.) Under the Christians Paneas became a bishopric. It is still called Bâniâs, and contains now only 150 houses. On the NE. side of the village the river, supposed to be the principal source of the Jordan, issues from a spacious cavern under a wall of rock. Around this source are many hewn stones. In the face of the perpendicular rock, directly over the cavern and in other parts, several niches have been cut, apparently to receive statues. Each of these niches had once an inscription; and one of them, copied by Burckhardt, appears to have been a dedication by a priest of Pan. There can be no doubt that this cavern is the cave of Pan mentioned above; and the hewn stones around the spring may have belonged perhaps to the temple of Augustus. This spring was considered by Josephus to be the outlet of a small lake called Phiala, situated 120 stadia from Paneas towards Trachonitis or the NE. Respecting this lake see Vol. II. p. 519b.  - Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, William Smith, LLD, Ed.  

Caesarea Philippi was an ancient Roman city located at the southwestern base of Mount Hermon (Har Hermon or Arabic Jebel esh-Sheikh). The city is mentioned in the gospels of Matthew,and Mark. The city was located within the region known as the "Panion" (the region of the Greek god Pan). Named after the deity associated with the grotto and shrines close to the spring called "Paneas". Today, the city, now no longer inhabited, is an archaeological site located within the Golan Heights. While Baniyas does not appear in the Old Testament, Philostorgius, Theodoret, Benjamin of Tudela and Samuel ben Samson all incorrectly identified it with Laish (Tel Dan). While Eusebius of Caesarea accurately places Dan/laish in the vicinity of Paneas at the fourth mile on the route to Tyre. - Wikipedia

 

Map of the Roman Empire (Click to Enlarge)

Large Map of the Roman Empire (Clickable Locations)

The Roman Empire During the First Century AD

Maps are essential for any serious study, they help students of Roman history understand the geographical locations and historical backgrounds of the places mentioned in historical sources.

Map of New Testament Israel  |  Map of Old Testament Israel

Map of the Roman Empire  |  Bible History Online



Map of the Roman Empire - Places

Places

3-Taverns

Abydos

Achaea

Actium

Adramyttium

Aegean Sea

Aegyptus

Africa

Agrigentum

Alexandria

Alla

Alps

Amasea

Amastris

Amisus

Amphipolis

Ancona

Ancyra

Antiium

Antioch

Apamea

Apollonia

Appennines

Aquitania

Arabian Desert

Ariminum

Arretium

Asia

Athens

Attalia

Baetica

Balearic Islands

Belgica

Beroea

Berytus

Bononia

Burdigala

Byzantium

Caesarea

Caesarea Philippi

Canopus

Cappadocia

Capri

Carchemish

Carthage

Cenchreae

Chios

Cilicia

Cnidus

Colossae

Comana

Corduba

Corinth

Corsica

Creta

Cyrenaica

Cyrene

Cyzicus

Dacia

Damascus

Danube River

Delphi

Derbe

Dniester River

Douro River

Dyrrhachium

Ebro River

Edessa

Emerita Augusta

Emesa

Ephesus

Epiphania

Euphrates River

Fair Havens

Florentia

Forum Appius

Gades

Galatia

Gallia

Gangra

Garonne River

Gaza

Genua

Germania

Gordium

Greater Syrtis

Guadalquivir River

Guadiana River

Halicarnassus

Halys River

Haran

Heliopolis

Heraclea Pontus

Hippo Regius

Hispalis

Hispania

Iconium

Illyricum

Istros

Italia

Jerusalem

Joppa

Jordan River

Judaea

Kure Mountains

Laodicea

Larissa

Lasea

Leptis Magna

Lesser Syritis

Luca

Loire River

Lugdunensis

Lusitania

Lycia

Lystra

Macedonia

Magnesia

Malta

Massilia

Mauritania Caesariensis

Mauritania Tingitana

Mazaca

Mediterranean Sea

Memphis

Messana

Messembria

Miletus

Moesia

Mount Sinai

Myra

Nabataean Kingdom

Narbonensis

Naucratis

Neapolis

Nemausus

Nicaea

Nicephorium

Nicomedia

Nicopolis

Nile River

Numidia

Oceanus Atlanticus

Odessus

Oea

Orontes River

Paestum

Palmyra

Pannonia

Panormus

Paphos

Patara

Patmos

Pelusium

Perga

Pergamum

Perusia

Pessinus

Petra

Philadelphia

Philippi

Philippopolis

Phoenix

Po River

Pola

Pompeii

Pontus Euxinus

Porta Veneris

Prusa

Prut River

Ptolemais

Puteoli

Pyrenees

Ravenna

Rhodes

Rome

Sabratha

Sahara Desert

Sais

Salamis

Salmone

Salonae

Samaria

Samosata

Saonne River

Sardinia

Sardis

Sarmatia

Scodra

Scythians

Sea of Adria

Seine River

Sicilia

Side

Sidon

Sinope

Sinus Arabicus

Siscia

Smyrna

Sparta

Syracuse

Syria

Tagus River

Tarraco

Tarraconensis

Tarsus

Taurus Mountains

Terracini

Thapsus

Thayatira

Thebes

Thessalonica

Thrace

Tiber River

Tiberias

Tisza River

Tomi

Trapezus

Tripolis

Troas

Tyre

Utica

Valentia

Zeugma