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July 21    Scripture

Sites - Jerusalem: Tower of David
Ancient Jerusalem

David's Tower Travel Information If you would like to see some of the amazing historic remains on your trip to Israel, stop at Davidís Tower. Despite its name, Davidís Tower was not built by King David. It was actually built by Herod the Great on a Hasmonaean foundation in his attempts to secure Jerusalemís northern wall, which was always considered the weakest in regard to defense. The three towers built were named after Herod the Greatís 3 favorite peopleóMiriam (his wife), Phasael (his brother) and Hippicus (his friend). Only the base of the tower of Phasael remains after all of this time, though the fortress was only destroyed in part because of its enormous size by the Romans during the first Jewish Revolt (66-70 AD). It also survived the Islamic, Crusader and Turkish periods up through WWI. Rich with history, itís no wonder Davidís Tower is such a popular stop on tours to the Holy Land. (America Israel Travel)
http://www.bible-history.com/subcat.php?id=49


Tower of David in Wikipedia The Tower of David (Hebrew: מגדל דוד‎, Migdal David, Arabic: برج داود‎, Burj Daud) is an ancient citadel located near the Jaffa Gate entrance to the Old City of Jerusalem. Built to strengthen a strategically weak point in the Old City's defenses, the citadel was constructed during the second century BCE and subsequently destroyed and rebuilt by, in succession, the Christian, Muslim, Mamluk, and Ottoman conquerors of Jerusalem. It contains important archaeological finds dating back 2,700 years, and is a popular venue for benefit events, craft shows, concerts, and sound-and-light performances. The name "Tower of David" is only accurate in the historical sense, as King David's original tower and fortifications were destroyed to the foundation several hundred years before this tower was reconstructed on them and rebuilt continuously. History -- During the second century BC, the Old City of Jerusalem expanded onto the so-called Western Hill. This 773-meter- high prominence, which comprises the modern Armenian and Jewish Quarters as well as Mount Zion, was bounded by steep valleys on all sides except for its northwest corner. After King David and his son the legendary King Solomon's initial fortifications, King Hezekiah may have been the first to specifically fortify this area. Centuries later, the Hasmonean kings surrounded the area with an impressive wall and large watchtowers, which historian Josephus Flavius (1st century AD) refers to as the First Wall. Herod, who assumed power after the fall of the Hasmonean dynasty, added three massive towers to the fortifications in 37Ė34 BC. He built these at the vulnerable northwest corner of the Western Hill, where the Tower of David is now located. His purpose was not only to defend the city, but to safeguard his own royal palace located nearby on Mount Zion. Herod named the tallest of the towers, 145 feet in height, the Phasael in memory of his brother who had committed suicide. Another tower was called the Miriam, named for his second wife whom he had executed and buried in a cave to the west of the tower. He named the third tower the Hippicus after one of his friends. Of the three towers, only the Phasael still stands today. Following the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans in 70 AD, the site served as barracks for the Roman troops. When the Roman Empire adopted Christianity as the imperial religion in the 4th century, a community of monks established itself in the citadel. After the Arab conquest of Jerusalem in 638, the new Muslim rulers refurbished the citadel. This powerful structure withstood the assault of the Crusaders in 1099, and surrendered only when its defenders were guaranteed safe passage out of the city. During the Crusader period, thousands of pilgrims undertook the pilgrimage to Jerusalem by way of the port at Jaffa. To protect pilgrims from the menace of highway robbers, the Crusaders built a tower surrounded by a moat atop the citadel, and posted lookouts to guard the road to Jaffa. The citadel also served as the seat of the Crusader kings of Jerusalem. In 1187, Sultan Saladin captured the city and the site. The Mamluks destroyed it in 1260 and later rebuilt it. The citadel was rebuilt yet again between 1537 and 1541 by the Ottomans, who designed an impressive entrance, behind which stood a cannon emplacement. For 400 years, the citadel served as a garrison for Turkish troops. The Ottomans also installed a mosque at the site and added the minaret, which still stands today. It was during this time that the complex began to be called the "Tower of David", after the founder- king of Jerusalem. During World War I, British forces under General Edmund Allenby captured Jerusalem. General Allenby formally proclaimed the event standing on a platform outside the entrance to the Tower of David. During the period of the British Mandate (1917Ė1948), the British High Commissioner established the Pro-Jerusalem Society to protect the city's cultural heritage. This organization cleaned and renovated the citadel and reopened it to the public as a venue for concerts, benefit events and exhibitions by local artists. In the 1930s, a museum of Palestinian folklore was opened in the citadel, displaying traditional crafts and clothing.[1] Following the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the Arab Legion captured Jerusalem and converted the citadel back to its historical role as a military position, as it commanded a dominant view across the armistice line into Jewish Jerusalem. With the occupation of East Jerusalem in 1967 after the Six-Day War, the citadel's cultural role was revived. Tower of David Museum -- The Tower of David Museum of the History of Jerusalem was opened in 1989 by the Jerusalem Foundation. Located in a series of chambers in the original citadel, the museum includes a courtyard which contains archeological ruins dating back 2,700 years. The exhibits depict 4,000 years of Jerusalem's history, from its beginnings as a Canaanite city to modern times. Using maps, videotapes, holograms, drawings and models, the exhibit rooms each depict Jerusalem under its various rulers. Visitors may also ascend to the ramparts, which command a 360-degree view of the Old City and New City of Jerusalem. As of 2002, the Jerusalem Foundation reported that over 3.5 million visitors had toured the museum.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_David


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