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September 24    Scripture

Ancient Near East: Pictures and Photos
Images and art pictures relating to the Ancient Near East.

A harp, made in the image of a bull (Ur) [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/burharp.gif


A Persian helmet lost during the Olympia campaign in Greece, 490 B.C. (Olympia Museum). The inscription added by the Greeks indicates that it ended as booty dedicated to the gods. The helmet style is Assyrian. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid metal working and coinage]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/helmet01.jpg


A Scene from The "Epic of Gilgamesh" (Ur) The "Epic of Gilgamesh" is perhaps the oldest known story in the world. It centered on a legendary king from the Sumerian city-state of Uruk. Later Mesopotamian civilizations adopted this myth as their own. It was finally written down on clay tablets like the one above, in the wedge-shaped written language of cuneiform. [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/bgilgapic.jpg


A torque pair with lion-head terminals. Some of the cloisonne inlays survive. Achaemenid grave at Susa, 4th c. B.C. (Paris: Louvre). 20 cm. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid metal working and coinage]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/jewelry01.jpg


Achæmenid gold plaque from the Oxus Treasure. A Persian magus carries the barsom - the sacred twigs associated with priesthood. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid metal working and coinage]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/gold01.jpg


Assyrian Archer This stela depicts an Assyrian archer. The Assyrian Empire was unrivaled in its cruel, ruthless methods of warfare. [ASSYRIA] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/bassyrian.jpg


Boardgame (Ur) This boardgame, found in the Royal Tombs of Ur, is perhaps the oldest in the world. [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/jaydambrosio/boardgame.jpg


Bull's head carving from column capital at Persopolis. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid stone carving]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/carving03.jpg


Close uo of The lion that adorns the Ishtar Gate Close up of the lions that adorn the Ishtar Gate. [BABYLONIA] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/blion1.jpg


Cylinder Seals (Ur) Sumerian merchants used cylinder seals to mark the completion of a trade agreement. [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/cylinderSeal1.JPG


Double Bull Capital from the Palace of Darius Persian, Achaemenid: Double bull capital from the Apadana Hall, Palace of Darius at Persepolis. ca. 500 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE087.html


Female Head (Ur) This female head originated in the city-state of Uruk. [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/UrukHead1.JPG


Gold coin. Achæmenid daric showing a warrior, perhaps based on Elam model. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid metal working and coinage]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/coin01.jpg


Griffin's head from column at Persopolis . May reflect a borrowing a Mesopotamian political symbolism. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid stone carving]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/carving02.jpg


Gudea (Ur) Gudea was an important ensi, or priest-ruler, of the city-state of Lagash. [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/Gudea-1c.JPG


Hammurabi Stela A wealthy empire eventually rose to challenge the supremacy of Assyria. This empire was known as Babylonia. Hammurabi, an early ruler of Babylonia, created an important written law code. This stela depicts Hammurabi receiving the law code from Shamash, the sun-god. [BABYLONIA] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/ham.jpg


Hammurabi's Code, View a Stela information on Mesopotamia, Sumer, and Hammurabi [People in History] [Searches and Tools]
http://www.gregpetersoninspections.com/hammurabi.jpg


Head from a statue of an archer from the walls of the palace at Persopolis. Typical Achæmenid aesthetic interest in repeated patterns. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid stone carving]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/statue01.jpg


Headdress (Ur) This headdress belonged to a Sumerian queen. [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/UbRheaddress.jpg


Immortal infantry. A lancer and archer. Frieze of glazed tiles showing Immortal infantry. A lancer and archer. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid glazed tile relief]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/tiles01.jpg


Ishtar Gate Neo-Babylonian; Ishtar Gate, Babylon: (restored)ca. 575 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE079.html


Ishtar Gate 2 Neo-Babylonian; Ishtar Gate: detail of [R.] flanking tower with motifs of Bulls and Dragons, ca. 575 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE080.html


Ishtar Gate 3 Neo-Babylonian; Ishtar Gate: Processional Way, guardian lions on Right side, ca. 575 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE082.html


Ishtar Gate 4 Neo-Babylonian; Ishtar Gate: Processional Way, detail of guardian lions on Left side, ca. 575 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE083.html


Ishtar Gate 5 Neo-Babylonian; Ishtar Gate, Babylon: detail of single guardian lion from Left side, ca. 575 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE084.html


Ishtar Gate 6 Neo-Babylonian; Ishtar Gate, Babylon: detail of head of guardian lion from Left side, ca. 575 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE085.html


Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal Neo-Assyrian; Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: the king on horseback, spearing a lion, detail of relief from royal palace at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 668-627 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE065.html


Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal 2 Neo-Assyrian; Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: bodyguards at the rear of the royal chariot protect the king from a charging lion, detail of relief from royal palace at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 668-627 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE066.html


Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal 3 Neo-Assyrian; Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: release of a captive lion into the hunting enclosure, detail of relief from royal palace at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 668-627 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE067.html


Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal 4 Neo-Assyrian; Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: the king on foot, slaying a lion (after similar motif on the royal seal), detail of relief from royal palace at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 668-627 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE068.html


Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal 5 Neo-Assyrian; Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: a lion, in agony, its head transfixed by an arrow; detail of relief from royal palace at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 668-627 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE070.html


Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal 6 Neo-Assyrian; Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: wounded lion, detail of relief from royal palace at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 668-627 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE071.html


Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal 7 Neo-Assyrian; Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: wounded lioness, detail of relief from royal palace at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 668-627 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE229.html


Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal 8 Neo-Assyrian; Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: detail of wounded lioness, detail of relief from royal palace at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 668-627 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE073.html


Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal 9 Neo-Assyrian; Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: Lion Hunt of Ashurbanipal: dying lion, detail of relief from royal palace at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 668-627 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE074.html


Lion's head from top of a column at Persopolis. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid stone carving]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/carving01.jpg


Palace relief of Tiglathpileser III, king of Assyria Stone panel Attacking on an enemy town. Assyrian Bureaucrats 8th C BC palace relief from the British Museum showing scribes entering the spoils of war. [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/me/s/stone_panel,_central_palace.aspx


Palace relief of Tiglathpileser III, king of Assyria 2 Stone panel - King in chariot. Assyrian Bureaucrats 8th C BC palace relief from the British Museum showing scribes entering the spoils of war. [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/me/s/stone_panel,_central_palace-1.aspx


Persian Guard in Headdress Persian, Achaemenid: Persian guard in headdress of one of the Ten Thousand Immortals, fragment of relief from the Palace of Xerxes at Persepolis. ca. 486-464 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE088.html


Persian winter palace at Susa Glazed tile relief originally from the Persian winter palace at Susa, capital of Elam. 520-500 B.C. (Paris: Louvre). Another imperial guard. The light military dress was designed for offensive combat, to rush out to address crises within the far-flung Persian Empire. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid glazed tile relief]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/relief02.jpg


Ram-in-the-thicket (Ur) [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/bURraminthicket.jpg


Relief of soldiers from Persopolis with wicker shields. 6th c. B.C. (East Berlin: Pergamum Museum). [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid stone carving]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/relief04.jpg


Relief of winged creatures at the gate of Persopolis . Probably derived from Babylonian supernatural beings who guard the entrances to sacred places, and perhaps Babylonia is also the source for reconstituting the Achæmenid dynasty in terms of sacral kingship. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid stone carving]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/relief01.jpg


Sargon (Akkad) The city-states of Mesopotamia were finally conquered and unified by the ambitious ruler, Sargon. He created the world's first empire, Akkad. [AKKAD] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/Sargon.JPG


Siege of Lachich (Judah) Neo-Assyrian; Siege of Lachich (Judah): Assyrian army attacking the walls with a siege-engine, relief from SW. Palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 701 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE048.html


Siege of Lachich (Judah) 3 Neo-Assyrian; Siege of Lachich (Judah): Assyrian army attacking the walls with a siege-engine, relief from SW. Palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 701 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE050.html


Siege of Lachich (Judah) 4 Neo-Assyrian; Siege of Lachich (Judah): Assyrian army attacking the walls with a siege-engine, relief from SW. Palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 701 B.C. The city defenders hard pressed by the Assyrian attackers, detail [L] From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE051.html


Siege of Lachich (Judah) 5 Neo-Assyrian; Siege of Lachich (Judah): Assyrian sappers undermine the city walls, detail [L.] relief from SW. Palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 701 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE052.html


Siege of Lachich (Judah) 6 Neo-Assyrian; Siege of Lachich (Judah): Captives led away from the city; [R.] the Assyrian assault on the city walls, relief from SW. Palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 701 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE053.html


Siege of Lachich (Judah) 7 Neo-Assyrian; Siege of Lachich (Judah): a city defender falls to his death from the battlements, detail [R.] relief from SW. Palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 701 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE054.html


Siege of Lachich (Judah) 8 Neo-Assyrian; Siege of Lachich (Judah): amphibious troops use inflated animals skins to cross a river teeming with fish, detail [R.] relief from SW. Palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 701 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE055.html


Siege of Lachich (Judah) 9 Neo-Assyrian; Siege of Lachich (Judah): captive musicians sing praises to the conqueror, detail of relief from SW. Palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 701 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE056.html


Siege of Lachich (Judah) Close Neo-Assyrian; Siege of Lachich (Judah): Assyrian army attacking the walls with a siege-engine, relief from SW. Palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh (Kuyunjik). ca. 701 B.C. From AICT: Art Images for College Teaching.
http://www.arthist.umn.edu/aict/html/ancient/NE/NE049.html


Soldiers from the Ten Thousand Immortals. Glazed tile relief showing soldiers from the Ten Thousand Immortals. This imperial guard was an élite force made up of trustworthy ethnic Persians. From the Achæmenid winter palace at Susa, Elam. 520-500 B.C. (Paris: Louvre) [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid glazed tile relief]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/relief03.jpg


Statue Figurines (Ur) These statues were placed in Sumerian temples by worshippers. The statues were believed to pray for the person who put them there. [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/sumerstatues.JPG


Stone relief from palace of Persopolis. This typical Persian motif draws it wings and central ring from Egyptian and Mesopotamian prototypes. Traditional view is that the figure represents Ahura Mazda [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid stone carving]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/relief06.jpg


Sumerian streets and markets were busy with life-sustaining trade. [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/houses.jpg


The "Epic of Gilgamesh" (Ur) The "Epic of Gilgamesh" is perhaps the oldest known story in the world. It centered on a legendary king from the Sumerian city-state of Uruk. Later Mesopotamian civilizations adopted this myth as their own. It was finally written down on clay tablets like the one above, in the wedge-shaped written language of cuneiform. [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/bnemyth48.jpg


The city-state of Ur Most Sumerian cities were surrounded by high walls to keep out would-be invaders. The city-state of Ur is believed to have also been surrounded by a great moat. [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/ur_01.jpg


The Ishtar Gate was the triumphant entry-way into the city of Babylon. It was dedicated to Ishtar, the goddess of carnal love. [BABYLONIA] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/bishtargate.jpg


The Standard of Ur (two mosiac panels) The Standard of Ur is comprised of the two mosiac panels of an inlaid box. The Standard is important because it portrays the 3 main social levels in the city of Ur. [THE ROYAL TOMBS OF UR] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/jaydambrosio/standard.jpg


Tomb of Cyrus the Great (c. 550-529), near his palace at Pasargadæ. Cyrus, founder of the Persian Empire, won independence from the Media and expanded his control to Mesopotamia. He drew from Mesopotamia some ideological elements for a reconstructed monarchy. Tombs are above ground to prevent the corpse's being defiled. [Achæmids and Medes] [images] [Achæmenid architecture]
http://www.hp.uab.edu/image_archive/ugk/tomb01.jpg


Tower of Babel 3D Remake A truly enormous ziggurat dominated the skyline of the capital city of Babylon. It was referred to as "E-temen-enki", the "foundation of heaven and earth", or the Tower of Babel. [BABYLONIA] [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/babel.jpg


Ziggurat (Ur) The Sumerian city-state of Ur contained an enormous mountain temple, known as a ziggurat, to honor the moon-god, Nanna. [Near East] [Art] [Archaeology] [Architecture]
http://members.tripod.com/~jaydambrosio/BigzigguratUr.JPG


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