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April 23    Scripture

Ancient Near East: Collections
Ancient Mesopotamia Art and Archaeology

A Balikh Prospect LANDSCAPE STUDIES IN UPPER MESOPOTAMIA. Oriental Institute, University of Chicago
http://www-oi.uchicago.edu/OI/PROJ/JAZ/NN_Fall95/NN_Fall95.html


A Great Assemblage An Exhibit of Judaica in honor of the opening of the Joseph Slifka Center for Jewish Life at Yale. 1 Kings 8:65
http://www.library.yale.edu/exhibition/judaica/


Ancient Art: Mesopotamia Mesopotamia, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, was the fertile river plain where civilization was born and where writing first appeared. Southern Mesopotamia was under the control of a series of kings from 3000 B.C. to the 6th century B.C. In its early history, Mesopotamia was a collection of agricultural city-states. These later gave way to centrally controlled empires which spread through conquest.
http://www.huntfor.com/arthistory/ancient/mesopotamia.htm


Carlos Museum - Ancient Near Eastern Art: Introduction The Near Eastern collections of the Carlos Museum embody the legacy of the ancient Near East from the beginnings of agriculture and writing to the growth of the first cities and empires.
http://www.carlos.emory.edu/


MESOPOTAMIA Art Gallery After an extensive study, it became quite certain to us that Native Iraqis (Chaldean/ Syriac & Jews of Iraq) community, are in an indispensable need of such an innovative art gallery such as Mesopotamia (Learning Studio & Art Gallery).
http://www.mesopotamiaartgallery.com/


NASA - The Search For Ubar This pair of images from space shows a portion of the southern Empty Quarter of the Arabian Peninsula in the country of Oman. On the left is a radar image of the region around the site of the fabled Lost City of Ubar, discovered in 1992 with the aid of remote sensing data.
http://www.nasaimages.org/luna/servlet/detail/nasaNAS~4~4~9638~111387:Space-radar-image-of-Ubar-optical-r


Near East Section: University of Pennsylvania Museum Special objects from the exhibition Treasures from the Royal Tombs of Ur are now on display on the second floor of the Museum near the main Museum Shop. The full exhibition will return to Penn Museum on or after 2012. This is a renowned collection from the Royal Cemetery at Ur (in modern-day Iraq), including a famous gold and lapis lazuli bullheaded lyre and a "Ram in the Thicket" sculpture, as well as Lady Pu-abi's headdress and jewelry, all from ca. 2650-2550 B.C. The story of the excavations at Ur as well as the archaeological and historical context of the finds are displayed, offering insight into this ancient civilization through its Royal Tombs.
http://www.museum.upenn.edu/new/exhibits/galleries/neareast.shtml


Nippur, Sacred City of Enlil: Supreme God of Sumer and Akkad The importance of the Mesopotamian holy city, Nippur (Fig. 1), is reflected even today in the great size of the mound, Nuffar (Fig. 2), located between Baghdad and Basra in southern Iraq. Nippur was one of the longest-lived sites, beginning in the prehistoric Ubaid period (c. 5000 B. C. ) and lasting until about A. D. 800, in the Islamic era
http://oi.uchicago.edu/research/projects/nip/nsc.html


Semitic Museum - Nuzi Home Page By about 2400 BCE, Hurrians - people who spoke the Hurrian language - had expanded southward from the highlands of Anatolia. They infiltrated and occupied a broad arc of fertile farmland stretching from the headwaters of the Habur River to the foothills of the Zagros Mountains.
http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~semitic/hsm/NuziHomePage.htm


Stolen Stones
http://www.archaeology.org/online/features/nineveh/index.html


Swords, Armor, and Figurines
http://www-oi.uchicago.edu/OI/PROJ/GOL/BA_95/BA_95.html


Tell Ahmar Excavations Til Barsib (also spelled Til Barsip; also called Tell Ahmar) is located along the eastern bank of the Euphrates River, c.100km northeast of Aleppo, Syria. The site (enclosed by a D-shaped fortification wall) is situated on the edge of a terrace, on elevated ground, overlooking the alluvial plain of the Euphrates.
http://www.learningsites.com/Barsib/Til-Barsib_home.html


The Deh Luran Archaeological Project In the 1960s Deh Luran was the focus of research designed to illuminate the development of agriculture, the concurrent development of early villages and towns, and the first complex societies. The research was undertaken by various U.S. teams, in cooperation with the Archaeological Service of Iran, and with the support of the U.S. National Science Foundation.
http://lw.lsa.umich.edu/umma/exhibits/dehluran/dehluran.html


The Detroit Institute of Arts: Mesopotamia Mesopotamia, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, was the fertile river plain where civilization was born and where writing first appeared. Southern Mesopotamia was under the control of a series of kings from 3000 B.C. to the 6th century B.C. In its early history, Mesopotamia was a collection of agricultural city-states. These later gave way to centrally controlled empires which spread through conquest.
http://www.dia.org/


The Goltepe/Kestel Project
http://www-oi.uchicago.edu/OI/PROJ/GOL/Goltepe.html


The Jazira Project
http://www-oi.uchicago.edu/OI/PROJ/JAZ/Jazira.html


The Jerablus - Tahtani Project, Syria The Jerablus Tahtani Project, North Syria, is an interdisciplinary research programme designed to investigate four key themes: the precocious expansion of the Uruk civilisation in the 4th millennium BC, secondary state formation in Early Bronze Age Syria, environmental and political reasons for widespread urban recession in the late 3rd millennium BC in the Near East, and the early history of archaeologically inaccessible Carchemish.
http://www.arcl.ed.ac.uk/arch/jerablus/jerahome.html


The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Gudea of Lagash 2141-2122 B.C.; Mesopotamian, Neo-Sumerian period; Paragonite; 41 cm (16 1/8 in.); Founders Society Purchase, Robert H. Tannahill Foundation Fund; 82.64.

Of all the rulers of ancient Mesopotamia, Gudea, ensi (governor) of Lagash, emerges the most clearly across the millennia due to the survival of many of his religious texts and statues. He ruled his city-state in southeast Iraq for twenty years, bringing peace and prosperity at a time when the Guti, tribesmen from the northeastern mountains, occupied the land. His inscriptions describe vast building programs of temples for his gods.

This statuette depicts the governor in worship before his gods wearing the persian-lamb fur cap of the ensi and a shawl-like fringed robe with tassles. The serene, heavily lidded eyes and calm pose create a powerful portrait of this pious ruler.

A Sumerian cuneiform inscription on the back describes the building of a temple to the goddess Geshtinanna, consort of Gudea`s personal god, and the making of this statue for her. [The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Permanent Collection]
http://www.metmuseum.org/works_of_art/collection_database/ancient_near_eastern_art/statue_of_gudea/objectView.aspx?&OID=30008819&collID=3&vw


The Oriental Institute Museum The Oriental Institute Museum is a showcase of the history, art and archaeology of the ancient Near East. An integral part of the University of Chicago`s Oriental Institute, which has supported research and archaeological excavation in the Near East since 1919, the Museum exhibits major collections of antiquities from Egypt, Mesopotamia, Iran, Syria, Israel, and Anatolia.
http://www-oi.uchicago.edu/OI/MUS/OI_Museum.html


The Tall-e Bakun Project
http://www-oi.uchicago.edu/OI/PROJ/BAK/Bakun.html


Yale Babylonian Collection Some 5000 years ago, writing developed in the lower valley of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, and spread from there to the rest of ancient Mesopotamia, approximately present-day Iraq. The writing, called cuneiform ("wedge-shaped"), spread from there over the entire Near East. The Babylonian Collection houses the largest assemblage of cuneiform inscriptions in the United States, and one of the five largest in the world. The bulk of the inscriptions consists of clay tablets in all sizes and shapes. There are also a number of inscribed monuments on stone and other materials, some of considerable artistic interest, including a large collection of stamp and cylinder seals. In addition, the Collection maintains a complete library in the fields of Assyriology (the study of ancient Mesopotamia), Hittitology (ancient Anatolia, roughly equivalent to modern Turkey), and Near Eastern archaeology. It publishes several monograph series through the Yale University Press.
http://www.library.yale.edu/libraries/babylonian.html


Zagarell's Archaeology Page: Bakhtiari Archaeological Finds Bakhtiari Mountains of Southwest Iran The Bakhtiari project was begun in 1974 and was interrupted in 1978 by the Iranian Revolution. The project focused upon the long-term history (Epi-paleolithic-Bronze Age-Iron Age) and changing patterns of settlement over time. The research has also focused on the long-term adaptations, in an ecological and historical context of the peoples of this high mountain zone bordering the heartland of Mesopotamian civilization.
http://homepages.wmich.edu/~zagarell/


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