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Sites - Israel: Magdala
Ancient Israel Sites

Magdala No Jewish Israel tour would be complete without visiting the hometowns of some of the most well-known biblical figures, such as Magdala (the home of Mary Magdalene). Magdala was the home of many fisherman and dyers as well, having a total of 80 wool-selling shops at one point. Tarichae, Magdala’s Greek name, means “pickled fish”, which refers to the industry this village centered around. Magdala was very industrious as well, having a ship-building industry as well. Magdala has been identified by some scholars as Mark’s Dalmanutha (Mark 8:10), the place Jesus went to after feeding the 4,000. Not long ago the lake waters receded a bit and a foundation was discovered, which archaeologists identified it as a tower that may have been a lighthouse. Magdala is not only rich with history, but gorgeous scenery—Arbel Cliff and the main road Jesus took from Magdala to Nazareth (Valley of Doves). Magdala has so much to offer it’s no wonder it’s a favorite Holy Land tour destination. (America Israel Travel)
http://www.americaisrael.us

Magdala in Wikipedia Magdala (Aramaic מגדלא Magdala, meaning "elegant," "great," or "magnificent"; Hebrew מגדל Migdal, meaning "tower"; Arabic قرية المجدل, Qaryat Al Majdal) is the name of at least two places in ancient Israel mentioned in the Jewish Talmud and one place that may be mentioned in the Christian New Testament. Magdala was also a high stronghold in Ethiopia that was taken on April 13, 1868, by Sir Robert Napier, created Baron Napier of Magdala. Disputed location names - The New Testament makes one disputable mention of a place called Magdala. Matthew 15:39 of the King James' Version (KJV ) reads, "And he [Jesus] sent away the multitude, and took ship, and came into the coasts of Magdala". However, the most reliable Greek manuscripts give the name of the place as "Magadan", and more modern scholarly translations (such as the Revised Version) follow this. Although some commentators[1] state confidently that the two refer to the same place, others[2] dismiss the substitution of Magdala for Magadan as simply "to substitute a known for an unknown place". The parallel passage in Mark's gospel[8:10 ] gives (in the majority of manuscripts) a quite different place name, Dalmanutha, although a handful of manuscripts give either Magdala or Magadan[3] presumably by assimilation to the Matthean text—believed in ancient times to be older than that of Mark, though this opinion has now been reversed. The Jewish Talmud distinguishes between two Magdalas only.[4] Magdala Gadar—One Magdala was in the east, on the River Yarmouk near Gadara (in the Middle Ages "Jadar", now Umm Qais), thus acquiring the name Magdala Gadar. Magdala Nunayya—There was another, better-known Magdala near Tiberias, Magdala Nunayya ("Magdala of the fishes"), which would locate it on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. Al-Majdal, a Palestinian Arab village depopulated in the lead up to the 1948 Arab-Israeli war was identified as the site of this Magdala. The modern Israeli municipality of Migdal (Khirbet Medjdel), founded in 1910 and about 6 km NNW of Tiberias, has expanded into the area of the former village. the Magdalene - All four gospels[5] refer to a follower of Jesus called Mary Magdalene, and it has usually been assumed that this means "Mary from Magdala". There is no biblical information to indicate whether this was her home or her birthplace. Most Christian scholars assume that she was from the place the Talmud calls Magdala Nunayya, and that this is also where Jesus landed on the occasion recorded by Matthew.[4] Josephus - Josephus mentions a wealthy Galilean town, destroyed by the Romans in the Jewish War (III, x,) that has the Greek name Tarichaeae from its prosperous fisheries. Josephus does not give its Hebrew name. Some authors[6] identify this with Magdala.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magdala



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