Ark of the Covenant - Bible History Online

Bible History Online

Sub Categories
Abu Ghosh
Akko or Acre
Aphek or Antipatris
Arbel
Ashkelon
Avdat
Banias
Baram
Basilica of Annunciation
Beersheba
Beit She'an
Belvoir
Bet Alpha
Bet Guvrin
Bet Shearim
Bethlehem
Bethphage
Bethsaida
Caesarea
Cana
Capernaum
Carmel Caves
Chorazin
Crusader Remains
Dead Sea
Deir Hajla
Dor
Druze
Emmaus
En Afeq
En Avdat
En el-Mamoudiyeh
En Farah
En Gedi
En Hemed
En Yael
Eshtemoa
Essenes
Galilee Boat
Gamla
Gethsemane
Gezer
Golan
Gush Halav
Haifa
Hammat Tiberias
Hazan
Hazeva
Hazor
Hebron
Heptapegon
Herodian
Holy Land Churches
Holy Land Monasteries
Horns of Hattin
Hunin
Inn of the Good Samaritan
Jacob's Well
Jaffa
Jericho
Jib
Khallat ed-Danabiya
Khan el-Ahmar
Khirbet ed-Deir
Khirbet el-Beiyudat
Khirbet el-Mafjar
Khirbet Mird
Khirbet Shema
Khirbet Suseya
Kiryat Yearim
Kursi
Kypros
Lakhish
Latrun
Magdala
Makhtesh Ramon
Mamre
Mamshit
Maon
Mar Saba
Masada
Mazor Mausoleum
Megiddo
Meroth
Montfort
Mount Carmel
Mount Gerizim
Mount Gilboa
Mount of Olives
Mount of Temptation
Mount Scopus
Mount Tabor
Nabataeans
Nabi Musa
Nabi Samwil
Nablus
Nain
Nazareth
Negev
Nimrud
Nizzana
Philistine Remains
Plain of Sharon
Qasrin
Qubeiba
Qumran
Ramat Hanadiv
Ramla
Roman Roads
Rosh Zayit
Rujm el-Hiri
Samaria
Samaritans
Sea of Galilee
Sepphoris
Shepherds Fields
Shiloh
Shivta
Solomon's Quarries
Solomons' Pools
Susita
Tel Arad
Tel Aviv - Jaffa
Tel Balata
Tel Beer Sheva
Tel Dan
Tel el - Farah
Tel er - Ras
Tel es - Samrat
Tel es - Sultan
Tel Miqne
Tel Qedesh
Tell Abu Hawam
The Galilee
Tiberias
Timna
Tourist Attractions
Tulul Abu el - Alaiq
Valley of Elah
Wadi Khareitum
Yad Hashmonah
Yardenit
Yehiam

Back to Categories

October 23    Scripture

Sites - Israel: Tel Balata
Ancient Israel

Tel Balata in Wikipedia Tell Balata (Arabic: تل بلاطة‎) is the site of the remains of an ancient city located in the Palestinian city of Nablus in the West Bank.[1] The site is listed by UNESCO as part of the Inventory of Cultural and Natural Heritage Sites of Potential Outstanding Universal Value in the Palestinian Territories.[1] Experts estimate that the towers and buildings at the site date back 5,000 years to the Chalcolithic and Bronze Ages.[1] Traditionally, the site has been associated with biblical Shechem, based on circumstantial evidence such as its location and preliminary evidence of habitation during the late Bronze and early Iron Ages.[2] No inscriptional evidence to support this conclusion has been found in situ, and other sites have also been identified as the possible site of biblical Shechem; for example, Yitzhak Magen locates it nearby on Mount Gerizim itself.[2][3] Name -- Tell is the Hebrew and Arabic word for an archaeological mound.[4] Balata is the name of the ancient Arab village located on the tell, and of the adjacent Palestinian refugee camp of Balata established in 1950.[5] The name was preserved by local residents and used to refer both to the village and the hill (and later on, the refugee camp).[6] One theory holds that balata is a derivation of the Aramaic word Balut, meaning acorn (or in Arabic, oak); another theory holds that it is a derivation of the Byzantine-Roman era, from the Greek word platanos, meaning terebinth, a type of tree that grew around the spring of Balata.[5][6] Location -- Tell Balata lies in a mountain pass between Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal, a location fits well with the geographical description provided for Shechem in the Bible.[2] The Palestinian village of Salim (biblical Salem) is located 4.5 kilometers (3 mi) to the west.[7] The built-up area of Balata, a Palestinian village and suburb of Nablus, covers about one-third of the tell, and overlooks a vast plain to the east.[8][9] Excavations -- Excavations were conducted at Tell Balata by the American Schools of Oriental Research between 1956 and 1964 when the West Bank was under the rule of Jordan.[10] Archaeologists who took part in this expedition included Paul and Nancy Lapp, Albert Glock, Lawrence Toombs, Edward Campbell, Robert Bull, Joe Seeger, and William G. Dever, among others.[11] Further excavations are to be undertaken by Palestinian archaeologists along with students from the University of Leiden in the Netherlands as part of a joint effort funded by the Dutch government.[1] Findings -- A 2002 final published report on the stratigraphic and architectural evidence at Tell Balata indicates that there was a break in occupation between the end of the Late Bronze Age (c. 1150 BC) through to the early Iron Age II (c. 975 BC).[12] A small quadrangular altar discovered in Tell Balata, similar to ones found in other Iron Age sites such as Tel Arad and Tel Dan, may have been used for burning incense.[13] One of the oldest coins discovered in Palestine was an electrum Greek Macedonian coin, dated to circa 500 BC, found at Tell Balata.[14] There is evidence that the site was inhabited in the Hellenistic period until the end of the 2nd century BC.[15] This Hellenistic era city was founded in the late 4th century BC and extended over an area of 6 hectares. The built structure shows evidence of considerable damage dated to the 190s BC, and attributed to Antiochus III's conquest of Palestine. Habitation continued until the final destruction of the city at this site in the late 2nd century BC. While this site was previously thought to be the site of the Samaritan city of Shechem said by Josephus to have been destroyed by John Hyrcanus I, Y. Magen places locates that city nearby, on Mount Gerizim at a site covering an area of 30 hectares.[3]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tell_Balata


If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2017 Bible History Online





More Bible History