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April 30    Scripture

Sites - Israel: Nabi Samwil
Ancient Israel

Nabi Samwil in Wikipedia An-Nabi Samwil also al-Nabi Samuil (Arabic: النبي صموئيل‎ an- Nabi Samwil, translit: "the prophet Samuel") is a Palestinian village of nearly 220 inhabitants in the West Bank, within the Jerusalem Governorate, located four kilometers north of Jerusalem. The village consists of a few houses and in addition to serving worshipers, its mosque acts as a prominent landmark. Geography Nabi Samwil is situated atop of a mountain, 890 meters above sea level, four kilometers north of the Jerusalem neighborhood Shuafat and southwest of Ramallah in the Seam Zone.[1] Nearby localities include Beit Iksa to the south, al-Jib to the north, Beit Hanina to the east and Biddu to the west.[2] The village consists of 1,592 dunams of which only dunams are built-up.[3] [edit]History See also: Tomb of Samuel The village is traditionally held to contain the tomb of the prophet Samuel (Arabic: Nabi Samwil),[1][4] from which the village receives its name. The tomb is draped by cloth and is located in a dark cellar in Nabi Samwil's large turreted mosque. A monastery was built by the Byzantines at Nabi Samwil, serving as a hostel for Christian pilgrims on their way to Jerusalem. The monastery was restored and enlarged during the reign of Justinian I in the mid-6th century CE. [5] Since then, the site has been a place of pilgrimage for Jews, Christians and Muslims alike.[1] The tomb continued to be in use throughout the early Arab period of rule in Palestine from the 7th to 10th centuries.[5] Jerusalem-born geographer al-Muqaddasi recounted in 985 CE, a story which he had heard from his uncle concerning the place: A certain Sultan wanted to take possession of the Dayr Shamwil, which he describes as a village about a farsakh from Jerusalem. The Sultan asked the owner to describe the village, at which the owner enumerated the ills of the place ("hard is the labour,/the profit is low./Weeds are all over,/almonds are bitter,/one bushel you sow,/one bushel you reap;") After hearing this the ruler exclaimed "Begone! We have no need for your village!"[6] 13th century Syrian geographer Yaqut al-Hamawi, describes "Mar Samwil" or "Maran Samwil" as a "a small town in the neighbourhood of Jerusalem. Mar in Syriac signifies al-Kass, 'the priest', and Samwil is the name of the Doctors of Law."[7] During Islamic times, Nabi Samwil became center for pottery production,[8] supplying nearby Jerusalem, as well as Ramla and Caesarea.[9]...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nabi_Samwil


Nebi Samuel Located near the Shufat neighborhood, on the north-western outskirts of Jerusalem, this is the traditional tomb of the biblical prophet Samuel. Following a familiar pattern, the Jewish shrine was taken over by Christians who built a church that subsequently became a mosque. (Israel Minister of Tourism)
http://www.goisrael.com/


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