Ark of the Covenant - Bible History Online

Bible History Online

Sub Categories
Abu Ghosh
Akko or Acre
Aphek or Antipatris
Arbel
Ashkelon
Avdat
Banias
Baram
Basilica of Annunciation
Beersheba
Beit She'an
Belvoir
Bet Alpha
Bet Guvrin
Bet Shearim
Bethlehem
Bethphage
Bethsaida
Caesarea
Cana
Capernaum
Carmel Caves
Chorazin
Crusader Remains
Dead Sea
Deir Hajla
Dor
Druze
Emmaus
En Afeq
En Avdat
En el-Mamoudiyeh
En Farah
En Gedi
En Hemed
En Yael
Eshtemoa
Essenes
Galilee Boat
Gamla
Gethsemane
Gezer
Golan
Gush Halav
Haifa
Hammat Tiberias
Hazan
Hazeva
Hazor
Hebron
Heptapegon
Herodian
Holy Land Churches
Holy Land Monasteries
Horns of Hattin
Hunin
Inn of the Good Samaritan
Jacob's Well
Jaffa
Jericho
Jib
Khallat ed-Danabiya
Khan el-Ahmar
Khirbet ed-Deir
Khirbet el-Beiyudat
Khirbet el-Mafjar
Khirbet Mird
Khirbet Shema
Khirbet Suseya
Kiryat Yearim
Kursi
Kypros
Lakhish
Latrun
Magdala
Makhtesh Ramon
Mamre
Mamshit
Maon
Mar Saba
Masada
Mazor Mausoleum
Megiddo
Meroth
Montfort
Mount Carmel
Mount Gerizim
Mount Gilboa
Mount of Olives
Mount of Temptation
Mount Scopus
Mount Tabor
Nabataeans
Nabi Musa
Nabi Samwil
Nablus
Nain
Nazareth
Negev
Nimrud
Nizzana
Philistine Remains
Plain of Sharon
Qasrin
Qubeiba
Qumran
Ramat Hanadiv
Ramla
Roman Roads
Rosh Zayit
Rujm el-Hiri
Samaria
Samaritans
Sea of Galilee
Sepphoris
Shepherds Fields
Shiloh
Shivta
Solomon's Quarries
Solomons' Pools
Susita
Tel Arad
Tel Aviv - Jaffa
Tel Balata
Tel Beer Sheva
Tel Dan
Tel el - Farah
Tel er - Ras
Tel es - Samrat
Tel es - Sultan
Tel Miqne
Tel Qedesh
Tell Abu Hawam
The Galilee
Tiberias
Timna
Tourist Attractions
Tulul Abu el - Alaiq
Valley of Elah
Wadi Khareitum
Yad Hashmonah
Yardenit
Yehiam

Back to Categories

November 23    Scripture

Sites - Israel: Lakhish
Ancient Israel

Lachish in Wikipedia Lachish (Hebrew: לכיש‎; Greek: Λαχις; Latin: Lachis) was a town located in the Shephelah, a region between Mount Hebron and the maritime plain of Philistia (Joshua 10:3, 5; 12:11). The town was first mentioned in the Amarna letters as Lakisha-Lakiša (EA 287, 288, 328, 329, 335). According to the Bible, the Israelites captured and destroyed Lachish for joining the league against the Gibeonites (Joshua 10:31-33), but its territory was later assigned to the tribe of Judah (15:39) and became a part of the Kingdom of Israel. History - Campaigns of the Neo-Assyrian Empire - Under Rehoboam, Lachish became the second most important city of the kingdom of Judah. In 701 BC, during the revolt of king Hezekiah against Assyria, it was captured by Sennacherib despite determined resistance (see Siege of Lachish). The town later reverted to Judaean control, only to fall to Nebuchadnezzar in his campaign against Judah (586 BC). During Old Testament times Lachish served an important protective function in defending Jerusalem and the interior of Judea. The easiest way to get a large attacking army (such as an Assyrian army, see Isaiah 36:2, Isaiah 37:8 and Jeremiah 34:7) up to Jerusalem was to approach from the coast. Lachish was one of several city/forts guarding the canyons that lead up to Jerusalem and greater Judea. In order to lay siege to Jerusalem an invading army would first have to take Lachish, which guarded the mountain pass. During the reign of Hezekiah, King of Judah, the Assyrians, under King Sennacherib, attempted to take Jerusalem, and, in that campaign, succeeded in taking Lachish (see 2 Chronicles 32:9 and Isaiah 36:2). Modern excavation of the site has revealed that the Assyrians built a stone and dirt ramp up to the level of the Lachish city wall, thereby allowing the soldiers to charge up the ramp and storm the city. Excavations revealed approximately 1,500 skulls in one of the caves near the site, and hundreds of arrowheads on the ramp and at the top of the city wall, indicating the ferocity of the battle. Biblical references to Lachish include Joshua 10:3, 5, 23, 31-35; Joshua 12:11; Joshua 15:39; 2 Kings 14:19; 2 Kings 18:14, 17; 2 Kings 19:8; 2 Chronicles 11:9; 2 Chronicles 25:27; 2 Chronicles 32:9; Nehemiah 11:30; Isaiah 36:2; Isaiah 37:8; Jeremiah 34:7; and Micah 1:13. Archaeology - - Identification - During the 19th and early 20th centuries, Lachish was identified with Tell el-Hesi from a cuneiform tablet found there (EA 333). The tablet is a letter from an Egyptian official named Paapu, reporting cases of treachery involving a local kinglet, Zimredda. Blast furnace - Excavations at Tell el-Hesy were conducted by Petrie and Bliss for the Palestine Exploration Fund during the years 1890 - 1892, and among other discoveries was the remains of what was identified as an iron blast furnace, with slag and ashes, which was dated to 1500 BC. If the theories of experts are correct, the use of the hot-air blast instead of cold air was known at an extremely early age. [edit]Classical Hebrew ostraca See also: Paleo-Hebrew alphabet More recent excavations have identified Tell ed-Duweir as Lachish beyond reasonable doubt. Excavation campaigns by James Leslie Starkey recovered a number of ostraca (18 in 1935, three more in 1938) from the latest occupational level immediately before the Chaldean siege. They then formed the only known corpus of documents in classical Hebrew. LMLK seals - Another major contribution to Biblical archaeology from excavations at Lachish are the LMLK seals, which were stamped on the handles of a particular form of ancient storage jar. More of these artifacts were found at this site (over 400; Ussishkin, 2004, pp. 2151-9) than any other place in Israel (Jerusalem remains in second place with more than 300). Most of them were collected from the surface during Starkey's excavations, but others were found in Level 1 (Persian and Greek era), Level 2 (period preceding Babylonian conquest by Nebuchadnezzar), and Level 3 (period preceding Assyrian conquest by Sennacherib). It is thanks to the work of David Ussishkin's team working at the site from 1973 - 1994 that eight of these stamped jars were restored (Ussishkin, 1983), thereby demonstrating lack of relevance between the jar volumes (which deviated as much as 5 gallons or 12 litres), and also proving their relation to the reign of Biblical king Hezekiah. The 1898 Reference by Bliss, contains numerous drawings, including examples of Phoenician, etc. pottery, and items from pharaonic Egypt, and other Mediterranean, and inland regions.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lachish


If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2017 Bible History Online





More Bible History