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October 20    Scripture

Sites - Israel: Kursi
Ancient Israel

Kursi Kursi, in the Land of the Gadarenes on the eastern shore of the Sea of Galilee, is believed to be where Jesus cast out demons into a herd of pigs that went crashing off a steep place into the lake (Matt. 8:28-34; Mark 5:1-17; Luke 8:26-37). Its rediscovery and restoration is an exciting chapter in Christian travel in the Holy Land. Like other sites, notably Bethsaida and Korazim, this site, too, was lost centuries ago when travel was much harder than it is today. The Gospels variant names for the place added to confusion about its location. Then, during road construction about 30 years ago, a mosaic came to light, and as Israeli archaeologists investigated further, a beautiful church emerged from the ground. They also found that Byzantine Christians had built a large tower around an adjacent “steep place.” Recalling an ancient Jewish name for this site that was similar to one in the Gospels, scholars realized this must be the place of the Miracle of the Swine. Visitors can now read the events where they may have actually happened, visit the church and climb to the steep place for a fabulous view of the Sea of Galilee. (Israel Minister of Tourism)
http://www.goisrael.com/


Kursi and Archaeology Kursi: Christian Monastery on the Shore of the Sea of Galilee. The church, during excavations. Mosaic floor of the aisle The Byzantine monastery of Kursi is situated east of the Sea of Galilee at the mouth of a wadi (riverbed) descending from the Golan Heights and creating a small, fertile valley along the shoreline. The remains of the ancient monastery came to light accidentally, during construction of a new road, and they were excavated in the years 1971-1974. The site is now open to the public as a national park. The location of Kursi, its architectural features and the testimony of early travelers identify it as the site where, according to tradition, Jesus healed two men possessed by demons. (Matthew 8: 28-33) To commemorate the miracle, a monastery was built there, probably at the beginning of the 6th century. The monastery is surrounded by a protective stone wall which creates a rectangular enclave measuring 140 x 120 m. The entrance, protected by a watchtower, faces west, towards the Sea of Galilee. In antiquity, a paved road led from the monastery to a small harbor which served Christian pilgrims arriving in boats. A wide, paved path led from the entrance of the monastery complex to a large plaza in front of the church at the center of the complex. The 45 x 25 m. rectangular church consists of a courtyard surrounded by pillars; these formed an atrium through which one entered the prayer hall itself. In its interior, two rows of eight stone columns supported Corinthian capitals of marble with crosses carved in relief. The columns divided the prayer hall into a nave and two side aisles. The whole floor of the church was paved with colored tesserae. Preserved mainly in the aisles, square frames are decorated with floral and faunal motifs, such as grapes, figs, pomegranates, fish, birds and water fowl. The faunal representations were almost obliterated, probably by members of the iconoclastic movement which became active in the early Arab period (7th century). At the eastern end of the church was a raised apse reached by two steps with two square rooms beside it. One was used as a baptistery, attested to by a Greek inscription, dedicating it to the Abbot Stephanos in the time of the Emperor Mauricius (end of the 6th century). Lateral wings were added to the sides of the church; the northern wing was an oil press, probably providing sacred oil for the pilgrims. To the south of the church there was a chapel with mosaic paving, beneath which was a crypt which contained the tombs of monks who had served in the monastery. Within the grounds of the monastery, living quarters for the monks and a hostel for housing pilgrims, as well as household utilities, were uncovered. Upon the slope overlooking the monastery to the south were the remains of a small chapel, incorporating a cave with a mosaic floor. In front of it stood a rock, some seven meters high, surrounded by revetment walls to prevent its collapse. This presumably marks the place where, according to tradition, the miracle recounted in the New Testament occurred. The monastery was damaged by an earthquake in the middle of the 8th century and abandoned. The site was excavated by D. Urman and V. Tzaferis on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority. [ARCHEOLOGICAL SITES] [Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs]
http://www.mfa.gov.il/


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