Ark of the Covenant - Bible History Online

Bible History Online

Sub Categories
Abu Ghosh
Akko or Acre
Aphek or Antipatris
Arbel
Ashkelon
Avdat
Banias
Baram
Basilica of Annunciation
Beersheba
Beit She'an
Belvoir
Bet Alpha
Bet Guvrin
Bet Shearim
Bethlehem
Bethphage
Bethsaida
Caesarea
Cana
Capernaum
Carmel Caves
Chorazin
Crusader Remains
Dead Sea
Deir Hajla
Dor
Druze
Emmaus
En Afeq
En Avdat
En el-Mamoudiyeh
En Farah
En Gedi
En Hemed
En Yael
Eshtemoa
Essenes
Galilee Boat
Gamla
Gethsemane
Gezer
Golan
Gush Halav
Haifa
Hammat Tiberias
Hazan
Hazeva
Hazor
Hebron
Heptapegon
Herodian
Holy Land Churches
Holy Land Monasteries
Horns of Hattin
Hunin
Inn of the Good Samaritan
Jacob's Well
Jaffa
Jericho
Jib
Khallat ed-Danabiya
Khan el-Ahmar
Khirbet ed-Deir
Khirbet el-Beiyudat
Khirbet el-Mafjar
Khirbet Mird
Khirbet Shema
Khirbet Suseya
Kiryat Yearim
Kursi
Kypros
Lakhish
Latrun
Magdala
Makhtesh Ramon
Mamre
Mamshit
Maon
Mar Saba
Masada
Mazor Mausoleum
Megiddo
Meroth
Montfort
Mount Carmel
Mount Gerizim
Mount Gilboa
Mount of Olives
Mount of Temptation
Mount Scopus
Mount Tabor
Nabataeans
Nabi Musa
Nabi Samwil
Nablus
Nain
Nazareth
Negev
Nimrud
Nizzana
Philistine Remains
Plain of Sharon
Qasrin
Qubeiba
Qumran
Ramat Hanadiv
Ramla
Roman Roads
Rosh Zayit
Rujm el-Hiri
Samaria
Samaritans
Sea of Galilee
Sepphoris
Shepherds Fields
Shiloh
Shivta
Solomon's Quarries
Solomons' Pools
Susita
Tel Arad
Tel Aviv - Jaffa
Tel Balata
Tel Beer Sheva
Tel Dan
Tel el - Farah
Tel er - Ras
Tel es - Samrat
Tel es - Sultan
Tel Miqne
Tel Qedesh
Tell Abu Hawam
The Galilee
Tiberias
Timna
Tourist Attractions
Tulul Abu el - Alaiq
Valley of Elah
Wadi Khareitum
Yad Hashmonah
Yardenit
Yehiam

Back to Categories

March 24    Scripture

Sites - Israel: Gezer
Ancient Israel

Gezer in Wikipedia Gezer (Hebrew: גֶּזֶר‎) was a town in ancient Israel. Scholars believe that Gezer is Tel Gezer (also known as Tell el-Jezer or Abu Shusheh), a site around midway on the route between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. Today the site is a national park in modern Israel. Location - Gezer was located on the northern fringe of the Shephelah, approximately thirty kilometres west of Jerusalem. It was strategically situated at the junction of the international coastal highway and the highway connecting it with Jerusalem through the valley of Ajalon. The view from Gezer encompassed the whole Coastal Plain below it, making it a strategic military center. Verification of the identification of this site with Biblical Gezer comes from Hebrew inscriptions found engraved on rocks, several hundred meters from the tel. These inscriptions from the 1st century BCE read "boundary of Gezer." History - Gezer is mentioned in Egyptian records, such as the writings of Thutmose III as well as the letters of Amarna, the Amarna Letters; and Pharaoh Merneptah boasted that he "seized Gezer". Amarna letters Gezer-(named Gazru, not Gaza, named Hazzatu) was ruled by 4 'mayors' during the 20 year Amarna letters period, 1350 BC. Later, Gezer is mentioned in connection with the conquest of the land under the leadership of Joshua (Joshua 10:33, 12:12), and was home to the Levites. It was noted to be under Philistine rule as David is said to have broken their rulership "from Geba to as far as to Gezer". It was the last point to which he pursued the Philistines (2 Sam. 5:25; 1 Chr. 14:16) after the battle of Baal-perazim. Later the Bible claims that Pharaoh of Egypt destroyed it (see Sack of Gezer) and gave it as a dowry to Solomon's wife. In 1177 AD, the plains around Gezer were the site of the Battle of Montgisard, in which the Crusaders under Baldwin IV defeated the forces of Saladin. Archaeological excavation at Gezer has been going on since the early 1900s, and it has become one of the most excavated sites in Israel. In the modern era, the site was discovered by Charles Simon Clermont-Ganneau in 1871. R. A. Stewart Macalister dug in the site between 1902 and 1907 on behalf of the Palestine Exploration Fund. Macalister recovered several artifacts discovered several constructions and defenses. He also established Gezer's habitation strata, though they were later found to be mostly incorrect (as well as many of his theories). Other notable archælogical expeditions to the site were made by Alan Rowe (1934), G.E. Wright (1964-5, at the head of the Hebrew Union College expedition), William Dever, Yigael Yadin, as well as the Andrews University. Discoveries - One of the best-known findings is the Gezer calendar. This is a plaque containing a text appearing to be either a schoolboy's memory exercises, or something designated for the collection of taxes from farmers. Another possibility is that the text was a popular folk song, or child's song, listing the months of the year according to the agricultural seasons. It has proved to be of value by informing modern researchers of ancient Middle Eastern script and language, as well as the agricultural seasons. Other interesting discoveries at the site related to Biblical archaeology: 8 monumental megaliths identified by Macalister as a Canaanite "high place" A double cave beneath the high place, probably used for divinatory purposes 9 inscribed boundary stones, making it the first positively identified Biblical city 6-chambered gate similar to those found at Hazor and Megiddo A large water-system comprising a tunnel going down to a spring, similar to that found in Jerusalem The excavations at Gezer from 1964-1974 were the first to grant academic/college credit to student excavators (now a common practice). Excavations were renewed in June 2006 by a consortium of institutions under the direction of Steve Ortiz (Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary) and Sam Wolff (Israel Antiquities Authority). The Tel Gezer Excavation and Publication Project is a multi-disciplinary field project investigating the Iron Age history of the ancient biblical city of Tel Gezer.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gezer


If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2016 Bible History Online





More Bible History