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October 18    Scripture

People - Ancient Rome: Magnentius
Born Flavius Magnus Magnentius, he was a usurper of the Roman Empire

Magnentius in Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities A German by birth who conspired against the life of the emperor Constans, whom he caused to be murdered in his bed. Subsequently, being pursued by the vengeance of Constantius, and defeated by him at the battle of Mursa (a. d. 351), he took his own life by falling on his sword. His reign lasted from A.D. 350 to 353. His full name was Flavius Popilius Magnentius. See Victor, Caes. 41 and 42.
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0062:alphabetic+letter%3DM:entry+group%3D2:entry%3Dmagnentius-harpers


Magnentius in Roman Biography Magnentius, mjg-nen'she-us, [Fr. Magnence, mtn'- yONss'7] (Fi.avius,) a Roman general, born in Germany about 300 A.D. While commanding an army in Gaul, he revolted against the emperor Constans, and usurped the empire of the West in 350. Constans was killed by his orders. Magnentius made himself master of the city of Koine. A war ensued between him and Constantius, who defeated the usurper on the river Drave in 351. He retreated to Gaul, was again defeated, and killed himself in August, 353 A.D. See Gikhon^" !><< in and Fall of the Roman Empire;" Le Beau, " Hiatnin tin Bas-Empin."
http://books.google.com/books?id=GPXRKSUyj14C&printsec=frontcover&dq=pronouncing+dictionary+of+biography+and+mythology&hl=en&ei=ueCoTLOHCpOi


Magnentius in Wikipedia Flavius Magnus Magnentius (303–August 11, 353) was a usurper of the Roman Empire (January 18, 350 – August 11, 353). Early life and career - Born in Samarobriva (Amiens), Gaul, Magnentius was the commander of the Herculians and Iovians, the imperial guard units[1]. When the army grew dissatisfied with the behaviour of Roman Emperor Constans, it elevated Magnentius at Autun on January 18, 350. Constans was abandoned by all except a handful of retainers, and he was slain shortly afterwards by a troop of light cavalry near the Pyrenees. Usurper - Magnentius quickly attracted the loyalty of the provinces in Britannia, Gaul, and Hispania, in part because he proved to be far more tolerant towards both Christians and Pagans. His control on Italia and Africa was applied through the election of his men to the most important offices. However, the short- lived revolt of Nepotianus, a member of the Constantinian dynasty, showed Magnentius that his status of Emperor was to be consolidated against the members of that dynasty. The self-proclaimed emperor tried to strengthen his grasp on the territories previously controlled by Constans, moving towards the Danube. Vetranio, commander of the Pannonian army, had been elected Augustus by his troops in Mursa on 1 March. This revolt had a loyalist mark, since Vetranio was supported by Constantina, and Constantius II himself recognized Vetranio, sending him the imperial diadem. Demise - The remaining emperor of the family of Constantine I, Constantius II broke off his war in Syria with Persia, and marched west. Despite Magnentius' efforts to gain Vetranio to his cause, the old general reached Constantius with his army, and resigned the crown. After electing Magnus Decentius (probably his brother) to Caesar and gathering as many troops as possible, the armies of Magnentius and Constantius met in the Battle of Mursa Major in 351; Magnentius led his troops into battle, while Constantius spent the day of battle praying in a nearby church. Despite Magnentius' heroism, his troops were defeated and forced to retreat back to Gaul. As a result of Magnentius' defeat, Italy ejected his garrisons and rejoined the loyalist cause. Magnentius made a final stand in 353 in the Battle of Mons Seleucus, after which he committed suicide by falling on his sword. Following the suppression of Magnentius' rebellion, Constantius commanded an investigation be made to find his followers. The most notorious agent in this search was the primicerius notariorum Paulus Catena. Some sources state that Magnentius' father was a Briton and his mother a Frank.[2]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnentius


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