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July 24    Scripture

People - Ancient Rome: Lucullus
Born Lucius Licinius Lucullus (c.118-57 B.C.), he was an optimas politician of the late Roman Republic.

Lucullus in Roman Biography Lu-cul'lus, (Lucius Licinius,) a celebrated Roman general, born of a patrician family about no B.C. In the year 87 he went to Asia as quajstor under Sulla, who gave him many proofs of his confidence. After an absence of several years, during which the civil war between Marius and Sulla raged at Rome, he returned, and was elected consul in 74 B.C. In this year he obtained the chief command in the war against Mithridates, whom he defeated at Cyzicus in 73, and, after other victories, drove him out of the kingdom of Pontus. He afterwards defeated Tigranes of Armenia, whose capital he took about 68 11.C The mutiny of his troops prevented his final triumph over Mithridates, and he was superseded by Pompey in the year 66. Cicero expressed the opinion that so great a war was never conducted with more prudence and courage. (" Pro Murama.") Lucullus then retired from public affairs, and expended part of the immense fortune he had acquired in the East in building magnificent villas, giving sumptuous entertainments, and collecting expensive paintings and statues. He was a liberal patron of learning and the arts. Sulla had dedicated to him his Commentaries. Plutarch, after comparing him with Cimon, says it is hard to say to which side the balance inclines. He was living in 59, but was not living in 56 B.C. See " Lucullus," in Plutarch's " Lives ;" Cicero, " Pro Lege Manilia;" Johan Upmahck, "Dissertatio historic* de Lucullo, 1701 Dion Cassius, " History of Rome," books xxxv. and xxxvn, ; Dkumann, "Geschiclue Roras," vol. iv. ; " Nouvelle Blugrauhie GiSiKSrale."
http://books.google.com/books?id=GPXRKSUyj14C&printsec=frontcover&dq=pronouncing+dictionary+of+biography+and+mythology&hl=en&ei=ueCoTLOHCpOi


Lucullus in Wikipedia Lucius Licinius Lucullus (c.118-57 B.C.), was an optimas politician of the late Roman Republic, closely connected with Sulla Felix. In the culmination of over twenty years of almost continuous military and government service, he became the main conqueror of the eastern kingdoms in the course of the Third Mithridatic War, exhibiting extraordinary generalship abilities in diverse situations, most famously during the siege of Cyzicus, 73-2 BC, and at the battle of Tigranocerta in Armenian Arzanene, 69 BC. His command style received unusually favourable attention from ancient military experts, and his campaigns appear to have been studied as exemplary of skillful generalship.[1] Lucullus returned to Rome from the east with so much captured booty that the whole could not be fully accounted, and poured enormous sums into private building, husbandry and even aquaculture projects which shocked and amazed his contemporaries by their magnitude. He also patronized the arts and sciences lavishly, transforming his hereditary estate in the Tusculan highlands into a hotel-and-library complex for scholars and philosophers. He built the horti Lucullani on the Pincian Hill in Rome, the famous gardens of Lucullus, and in general became a cultural revolutionary in the deployment of imperial wealth. He died during the winter of 57-56 B.C.[2] and was buried at the family estate near Tusculum. The sober and witty philosopher-historian, Lucius Aelius Tubero the Stoic, labelled him "Xerxes in a toga".[3] After his great personal foe Pompey heard this, he came up with what he considered a very clever joke of his own, calling Lucullus "Xerxes in a dress"...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucullus


Lucullus, L. Licinius in Harpers Dictionary A Roman celebrated as the conqueror of Mithridates. He fought on the side of Sulla in the Civil Wars with the Marian party, was praetor B.C. 77, and consul in 74. In the latter year he received the conduct of the war against Mithridates, which he carried on for eight years with great success (see Mithridates), but being unable to bring the war to a conclusion in consequence of the mutinous disposition of his troops, he was superseded in the command by Acilius Glabrio, B.C. 67. Glabrio, however, never took the command; but in the following year (B.C. 66) Lucullus had to resign the command to Pompey, who had been appointed by the Manilian law to supersede both him and Glabrio. On his return to Rome, Lucullus devoted himself to a life of indolence and luxury, and lived in a style of extraordinary magnificence. He died in B.C. 57 or 56. He was the first to introduce cherries into Italy, which he had brought with him from Cerasus in Pontus. The name of Lucullus became and has continued proverbial for extravagant and studied luxury. His gardens in the suburbs of the city were extraordinary for their splendour; his villas at Tusculum and Naples were laid out with such lavish disregard of expense in constructing fishponds (piscinae), cutting through hills and rocks, and throwing out moles into the sea, that Pompey called him, in derision, “the Roman Xerxes.” His domestic service was on a scale of equal magnificence. A single dinner cost him $10,000. Lucullus was not, however, a mere sensualist. He collected a fine library, which was open to the public; he enjoyed the conversation of philosophers and scholars, and himself wrote a work on the history of the Marsic War, composed in Greek. He was also the patron of the poet Archias, the friend of Cicero. His life was written by Plutarch, and in it may be found many curious anecdotes of this very remarkable and interesting man.
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0062:alphabetic+letter%3DL:entry+group%3D10:entry%3Dlucullus-harpers


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