Ark of the Covenant - Bible History Online

Bible History Online

Sub Categories
Abagtha
Abda
Abdeel
Abdi
Abdiel
Abdon
Abednego
Abel
Abi-albon
Abia
Abiasaph
Abiathar
Abida
Abidan
Abieezer
Abiel
Abiezrite
Abihail
Abihu
Abihud
Abijah
Abijam
Abimael
Abimelech
Abinadab
Abinoam
Abiram
Abishai
Abishua
Abishur
Abitub
Abner
Abraham
Abram
Absalom
Achaichus
Achan
Achbor
Achish
Adaiah
Adam
Adam II
Adbeel
Addar
Addi
Addon
Adiel
Adin
Adina
Adino
Adnah
Adoni-zedec
Adonibezek
Adonijah
Adonikam
Adoniram
Adoram
Adrammelech
Adriel
Agabus
Agag
Agee
Agrippa I
Agrippa II
Agur
Ahab
Ahasuerus
Ahaz
Ahaziah
Ahiam
Ahiezer
Ahihud
Ahijah
Ahikam
Ahimaaz
Ahiman
Ahimelech
Ahinadab
Ahio
Ahira
Ahishar
Ahithophel
Ahitub
Ahoah
Aholiab
Akkub
Alemeth
Alexander
Alexander the Great
Allon
Almodad
Alphaeus
Amalek
Amariah
Amasa
Amasai
Amashai
Amasiah
Amaziah
Amittai
Ammiel
Ammihud
Amminadab
Amminadib
Ammishaddai
Ammizabad
Ammon
Amnon
Amon
Amos
Amoz
Amplias
Amram
Amraphel
Anah
Anak
Anan
Ananias
Anath
Andrew
Andronicus
Aner
Annas
Antichrist
Antiochus
Antipas
Apelles
Apollos
Aquila
Ara
Arad
Aram
Aran
Araunah
Arba
Arbathite
Archelaus
Archippus
Archite
Ard
Ardon
Aretas
Arieh
Ariel
Arioch
Aristarchus
Aristobulus
Armoni
Arphaxad
Artaxerxes
Asa
Asahel
Asaph
Asher
Ashkenaz
Ashpenaz
Ashurbanipal
Asnapper
Asshur
Assos
Augustus
Azal
Azariah
Azaziah
Azel
Azmaveth
Azur and Azzur
Baal
Baalis
Baana
Baanah
Baasha
Balaam
Baladan
Balak
Bani
Bar-jesus
Bar-jona
Barabbas
Barachel
Barachias (Berechiah)
Barak
Bariah
Barkos
Barnabas
Barsabas
Bartholomew
Bartimaeus
Baruch
Barzillai
Bealiah
Becher
Bedan
Beeri
Bela
Belshazzar
Belteshazzar
Ben-ammi
Ben-hadad
Benaiah
Benjamin
Beor
Bera
Berachah
Berechiah
Bered
Beriah
Berodach-baladan
Bethelite
Bethuel
Bezaleel
Bezer
Bigtha
Bigthan
Bildad
Bilgah
Bilshan
Birsha
Blastus
Boanerges
Boaz
Bosor
Buz
Buzi
Caesar
Caiaphas
Cain
Cainan
Calcol
Caleb
Canaan
Canaanite
Carmi
Castor and Pollux
Cephas
Charran
Chedorlaomer
Chelubai
Chenaanah
Chenaiah
Chesed
Chileab
Chilion
Chimham
Chushan-rishathaim
Claudius
Clement
Cleopas
Cleophas
Conaniah
Coniah
Cornelius
Cosam
Crescens
Crispus
Cush
Cushite
Cyrenius
Cyrus
Dan
Daniel
Darda
Darius
Dathan
David
Debir
Dedan
Delaiah
Demas
Demetrius
Didymus
Dionysius
Diotrephes
Dishan
Dodai
Dodo
Doeg
Dumah
Ebal
Ebed
Ebed-melech
Eber
Eden
Eder
Edom
Eglon
Ehud
Elah
Elam
Elasah
Eldaah
Eldad
Eleazar
Elhanan
Eli
Eliab
Eliada
Eliakim
Eliam
Elias
Eliasaph
Eliashib
Eliathah
Elidad
Eliel
Eliezer
Elihu
Elijah
Elika
Elimelech
Elioenai
Eliphalet
Eliphaz
Elipheleh
Eliphelet
Elisha
Elishah
Elishama
Elishaphat
Elishua
Elkanah
Elmodam
Elnathan
Elon
Elymas
Enoch
Enos
Epaenetus
Epaphras
Epaphroditus
Ephah
Epher
Ephraim
Ephron
Er
Erastus
Esaias
Esarhaddon
Esau
Eshbaal
Eshcol
Eth-baal
Ethan
Ethiopian eunuch
Eutychus
Evil-merodach
Ezekias
Ezekiel
Ezra
Ezri
Felix
Festus (Porcius)
Fortunatus
Gaal
Gad
Gaddi
Gaddiel
Gahar
Gaius
Gallio
Gamaliel
Gamul
Gareb
Gatam
Geber
Gedaliah
Gehazi
Gemariah
Genubath
Gera
Gerah
Gershom
Gershon
Geshem
Gideon
Gilgamesh
Gog
Goliath
Gomer

Back to Categories

August 23    Scripture

Bible Names A-G: Gehazi


Gehazi in Easton's Bible Dictionary valley of vision, Elisha's trusted servant (2 Kings 4:31; 5:25; 8:4, 5). He appears in connection with the history of the Shunammite (2 Kings 4:14, 31) and of Naaman the Syrian. On this latter occasion he was guilty of duplicity and dishonesty of conduct, causing Elisha to denounce his crime with righteous sternness, and pass on him the terrible doom that the leprosy of Naaman would cleave to him and his for ever (5:20-27). He afterwards appeared before king Joram, to whom he recounted the great deeds of his master (2 Kings 8:1-6).
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/G/Gehazi/


Gehazi in Fausset's Bible Dictionary Elisha's servant. His messenger to the Shunammite woman (2 Kings 4); suggested the obtaining of a son from the Lord for her, as a meet reward for her kindness to the prophet. Trusted by Elisha with his staff to lay on the face of the lifeless youth. But reanimation was not effected until Elisha himself came: typifying that Moses the messenger, with his rod and the law, could not quicken dead souls, that is reserved for Jesus with His gospel. Gehazi proved himself lying and greedy of filthy lucre, and with his great spiritual privileges a sad contrast to Naaman's servants, who had none (2 Kings 5). They by wise counsel induced their master to subdue pride, and humbly to wash in the Jordan, according to the prophet's word. Gehazi presumptuously stifled conscience with the plea that a "Syrian" pagan ought not to have been" spared," as his master had "spared this Naaman," and even dared to invoke Jehovah's name, as though his obtaining money by false pretenses from him would be a meritorious act: "as the Lord liveth, I will take somewhat of him." In his master's name, under pretense of charity (!), as if wanting presents for "two sons of the prophets from mount Ephraim," he obtained from Naaman two talents of silver and two changes of raiment. Coveting, lying, taking, and hiding, followed in the order of sin's normal and awful development; as in Adam's and Achan's cases (Genesis 3; Joshua 7). Then God's detection: Elisha said, "Whence comest thou?" The liar was at no loss for a reply: "Thy servant went no where." Elisha sternly answered, "Went not mine heart with thee, when the man turned again, (compare Psalm 139)? Is it a time to receive money," etc.? Compare as to our times 1 Peter 4:3. Naaman from being a leper became newborn as "a little child" by believing obedience; Gehazi from being clean, by unbelieving disobedience, became a leper: if he must have Naaman's lucre, he must have Naaman's leprosy: "the leprosy of Naaman shall cleave unto thee for ever." Still in 2 Kings 8:4 Gehazi appears as "servant of the man of God," narrating to king Joram the great acts of Elisha and the restoration to life of the Shunammite's son, when lo! she herself appeared. Doubtless affliction brought Gehazi to sincere repentance, and repentance brought removal of the leprosy, which otherwise would have been "for ever." Compare Hezekiah's divinely foretold death averted by penitent prayer (2 Kings 20:1-5). This seems a more likely solution than supposing that this incident occurred before Gehazi's leprosy and has been transposed.
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/G/Gehazi/


Gehazi in Hitchcock's Bible Names valley of sight
http://www.bible-history.com/hitchcock/G/Gehazi/


Gehazi in Naves Topical Bible Servant of Elisha 2Ki 4:12,29,31 -Covetousness of, and the judgment of leprosy upon 2Ki 5:20-27 -Mentions to King Jehoram the miracles of Elisha, his master 2Ki 8:4,5
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/G/GEHAZI/


Gehazi in Smiths Bible Dictionary (valley of vision), the servant or boy of Elisha. He was sent as the prophet's messenger on two occasions to the good Shunammite, 2Ki 4:1 ... (B.C. 889-887); obtained fraudulently money and garments from Naaman, was miraculously smitten with incurable leprosy, and was dismissed from the prophet's service. 2Ki 5:1 ... Later in the history he is mentioned as being engaged in relating to King Joram all the great things which Elisha had done. 2Ki 8:4,5
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/G/Gehazi/


Gehazi in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE ge-ha'-zi (gechazi, except in 2 Ki 4:31; 5:25; 8:4,5, where it is gechazi, perhaps "valley of vision"): The confidential servant of Elisha. Various words are used to denote his relation to his master. He is generally called Elisha's "boy" (na`ar), servant or personal attendant; he calls himself (5:25) his master's servant or slave (`ebhedh), and if the reference be to him in 4:43 the Revised Version, margin, he receives the designation "minister" (meshareth), or chief servant of Elisha. 1. His Ready Service: Mention is made of him on three different occasions. He is first brought under notice in the story of the wealthy Shunammite (2 Ki 4:8-37) who provided in her house special accommodation for Elisha, which suited his simple tastes, and of which he availed himself as often as he passed that way. By command of his master, Gehazi called the Shunammite, that she might be rewarded by the prophet for her liberal hospitality. Failing to elicit from the lady a desire for any particular favor, and being himself at a loss to know how to repay her kindness, Elisha consulted with his servant, whose quick perception enabled him to indicate to his master the gift that would satisfy the great woman's heart. When on the death of her child the Shunammite sought out the man of God at Carmel, and in the intensity of her grief laid hold of the prophet's feet, "Gehazi came near to thrust her away" (2 Ki 4:27)--perhaps not so much from want of sympathy with the woman as from a desire to protect his master from what he considered a rude importunity. Then Elisha, who had discovered of himself (2 Ki 4:27), from what the woman had said (2 Ki 4:28), the cause of her sorrow, directed Gehazi, as a preliminary measure, to go at once to Shunem and lay his staff upon the face of the dead child. Gehazi did so, but the child was "not awaked." In this narrative Gehazi appears in a favorable light, as a willing, efficient servant, jealous of his master's honor; a man of quick observation, whose advice was worth asking in practical affairs...
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/G/GEHAZI/


Gehazi in Wikipedia Gehazi, Geichazi, or Giezi (Douay-Rheims) (Hebrew: גֵּיחֲזִי; Tiberian: Gḥăz; Standard: Geẖazi; "valley of vision") is a figure found in the Tanakh Books of Kings. He was Elisha's servant. He appears in connection with the history of the Shunammite[1] and of Naaman the Syrian. On this latter occasion, Gehazi, overcome with avarice, solicited, and obtained in the prophet's name "a talent of silver and two changes of garments" from Naaman. Consequently, he was guilty of duplicity and dishonesty of conduct, causing Elisha to denounce his crime with righteous sternness, and pass on him the terrible doom that "the leprosy of Naaman would cleave to him and his descendants for ever".[2] Later,[3] he appeared before King Joram, to whom he recounted the great deeds of his master.[4] In Rabbinic Literature, Gehazi is identified as one of four commoners who forfeited his share in Olam haba, the afterlife, because of his wickedness, especially in the presence of a upstanding example such as Elisha, and his consistent refusal to repent.[5] He is the ostensible subject of Rudyard Kipling's poem Gehazi, thought to be aimed at Rufus Isaacs, a member of the British Liberal government at the time the poem was composed.[6] Two meanings for the name "Gehazi" have been suggested: "valley of vision" or "valley of avarice."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gehazi


Gehazi Scripture - 2 Kings 4:29 Then he said to Gehazi, Gird up thy loins, and take my staff in thine hand, and go thy way: if thou meet any man, salute him not; and if any salute thee, answer him not again: and lay my staff upon the face of the child.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/2+Kings/4/


Gehazi Scripture - 2 Kings 4:36 And he called Gehazi, and said, Call this Shunammite. So he called her. And when she was come in unto him, he said, Take up thy son.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/2+Kings/4/


Gehazi Scripture - 2 Kings 8:5 And it came to pass, as he was telling the king how he had restored a dead body to life, that, behold, the woman, whose son he had restored to life, cried to the king for her house and for her land. And Gehazi said, My lord, O king, this [is] the woman, and this [is] her son, whom Elisha restored to life.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/2+Kings/8/


If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2017 Bible History Online





More Bible History