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November 21    Scripture

Bible Names A-G: Daniel





Daniel in Easton's Bible Dictionary God is my judge, or judge of God. (1.) David's second son, "born unto him in Hebron, of Abigail the Carmelitess" (1 Chr. 3:1). He is called also Chileab (2 Sam. 3:3). (2.) One of the four great prophets, although he is not once spoken of in the Old Testament as a prophet. His life and prophecies are recorded in the Book of Daniel. He was descended from one of the noble families of Judah (Dan. 1:3), and was probably born in Jerusalem about B.C. 623, during the reign of Josiah. At the first deportation of the Jews by Nebuchadnezzar (the kingdom of Israel had come to an end nearly a century before), or immediately after his victory over the Egyptians at the second battle of Carchemish, in the fourth year of the reign of Jehoiakim (B.C. 606), Daniel and other three noble youths were carried off to Babylon, along with part of the vessels of the temple. There he was obliged to enter into the service of the king of Babylon, and in accordance with the custom of the age received the Chaldean name of Belteshazzar, i.e., "prince of Bel," or "Bel protect the king!" His residence in Babylon was very probably in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar, now identified with a mass of shapeless mounds called the Kasr, on the right bank of the river. His training in the schools of the wise men in Babylon (Dan. 1:4) was to fit him for service to the empire. He was distinguished during this period for his piety and his stict observance of the Mosaic law (1:8-16), and gained the confidence and esteem of those who were over him. His habit of attention gained during his education in Jerusalem enabled him soon to master the wisdom and learning of the Chaldeans, and even to excel his compeers. At the close of his three years of discipline and training in the royal schools, Daniel was distinguished for his proficiency in the "wisdom" of his day, and was brought out into public life. He soon became known for his skill in the interpretation of dreams (1:17; 2:14), and rose to the rank of governor of the province of Babylon, and became "chief of the governors" (Chald. Rab-signin) over all the wise men of Babylon. He made known and also interpreted Nebuchadnezzar's dream; and many years afterwards, when he was now an old man, amid the alarm and consternation of the terrible night of Belshazzar's impious feast, he was called in at the instance of the queen-mother (perhaps Nitocris, the daughter of Nebuchadnezzar) to interpret the mysterious handwriting on the wall. He was rewarded with a purple robe and elevation to the rank of "third ruler." The place of "second ruler" was held by Belshazzar as associated with his father, Nabonidus, on the throne (5:16). Daniel interpreted the handwriting, and "in that night was Belshazzar the king of the Chaldeans slain." After the taking of Babylon, Cyrus, who was now master of all Asia from India to the Dardanelles, placed Darius (q.v.), a Median prince, on the throne, during the two years of whose reign Daniel held the office of first of the "three presidents" of the empire, and was thus practically at the head of affairs, no doubt interesting himself in the prospects of the captive Jews (Dan. 9), whom he had at last the happiness of seeing restored to their own land, although he did not return with them, but remained still in Babylon. His fidelity to God exposed him to persecution, and he was cast into a den of lions, but was miraculously delivered; after which Darius issued a decree enjoining reverence for "the God of Daniel" (6:26). He "prospered in the reign of Darius, and in the reign of Cyrus the Persian," whom he probably greatly influenced in the matter of the decree which put an end to the Captivity (B.C. 536). He had a series of prophetic visions vouch-safed to him which opened up the prospect of a glorious future for the people of God, and must have imparted peace and gladness to his spirit in his old age as he waited on at his post till the "end of the days." The time and circumstances of his death are not recorded. He probably died at Susa, about eighty-five years of age. Ezekiel, with whom he was contemporary, mentions him as a pattern of righteousness (14:14, 20) and wisdom (28:3). (See NEBUCHADNEZZAR T0002684.)
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/D/Daniel/


Daniel in Fausset's Bible Dictionary i.e. "God is my judge"; or as others, "the judge of God," as his Chaldee name Belteshazzar means "the prince of Bel." Probably from royal blood; compare Daniel 1:3 with 1 Chronicles 3:1, from whence it appears he bore the same name as David's son by Abigail (who is called Chileab in 2 Samuel 3:3 "like his father".) Carried to Babylon in Nebuchadnezzar's first deportation of captives, in the fourth (Jeremiah 25:1; Jeremiah 46:2) or third (Daniel 1:1 counting only complete years) year of Jehoiakim, the first of Nebuchadnezzar (acting under Nabopolassar in the last year of the latter's reign, but reigning alone not until the year after; as Daniel 2:1 proves, for after Daniel's three years' training the year is nevertheless called the "second" of Nebuchadnezzar, i.e. of his sole reign). Daniel was put in training with three others of the royal seed, still "children" (Daniel 1:4), according to eastern etiquette, to become courtiers; and to mark his new position he received a Babylonian name, Belteshazzar (compare 2 Kings 23:34; 2 Kings 24:17; Ezra 5:14; Esther 2:7)...
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/D/Daniel/


Daniel in Hitchcock's Bible Names judgment of God; God my judge
http://www.bible-history.com/hitchcock/D/Daniel/


Daniel in Naves Topical Bible 1. A Jewish captive, also called BELTESHAZZAR Educated at king's court Da 1 Interprets visions Da 2; 4; 5 Promotion and executive authority of Da 2:48,49; 5:11,29; 6:2 Conspiracy against, cast into the lions' den Da 6 Prophecies of Da 4:8,9; 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; Mt 24:15 Abstinence of Da 1:8-16 Wisdom of Da 1:17; Eze 28:3 Devoutness of Da 2:18; 6; 9; 10; 12; Eze 14:14 Courage and fidelity of Da 4:27; 5:17-23; 6:10-23 Worshiped by Nebuchadnezzar Da 2:6 -2. David's son Also called CHILEAB 2Sa 3:3; 1Ch 3:1 -3. A descendant of Ithamar, and a companion of Ezra Ezr 8:2; Ne 10:6
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/D/DANIEL/


Daniel in Smiths Bible Dictionary (judgment of God). 1. The second son of David, by Abigail the Carmelitess. 1Ch 3:1 In 2Sa 3:3 he is called Chileab. (B.C. about 1051.) 2. The fourth of 'the greater prophets." Nothing is known of his parentage or family. He appears, however, to have been of royal or noble descent, Da 1:3 and to have possessed considerable personal endowments. Da 1:4 He was taken to Babylon in "the third year of Jehoiakim" (B.C. 604), and trained for the king's service. He was divinely supported in his resolve to abstain from the "king's meat" for fear of defilement. Da 1:8-16 At the close of his three years discipline, Da 1:5,18 Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, Da 1:17 of interpreting dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi. Da 2:14 ff. In consequence of his success he was made "ruler of the whole province of Babylon." Da 2:48 He afterwards interpreted the second dream of Nebuchadnezzar, Da 4:8-27 and the handwriting on the wall which disturbed the feast of Belshazzar. Da 5:10-28 At the accession of Darius he was made first of the "three presidents" of the empire, Da 6:2 and was delivered from the lion's den, into which he had been cast for his faithfulness to the rites of his faith. Da 6:10-23 cf. Bel and Dr. 29-42. At the accession of Cyrus he still retained his prosperity, Da 6:28 cf. Dani 1:21 though he does not appear to have remained at Babylon, cf. Da 1:21 and in "the third year of Cyrus" (B.C. 534) he saw his last recorded vision, on the banks of the Tigris. Da 10:1,4 In the prophecies of Ezekiel mention is made of Daniel as a pattern of righteousness, Eze 14:14,20 and wisdom. Eze 28:3 The narrative in Da 1:11 implies that Daniel was conspicuously distinguished for purity and knowledge at a very early age. 3. A descendant of Ithamar, who returned with Ezra. Ezr 8:2 4. A priest who sealed the covenant drawn up by Nehemiah, B.C. 445. Ne 10:6 He is perhaps the same as No. 3.
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/D/Daniel/


Daniel in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE dan'-yel (daniye'l, dani'-el, "God is my judge"; Daniel): (1) One of the sons of David (1 Ch 3:1). (2) A Levite of the family of Ithamar (Ezr 8:2; Neh 10:6). (3) A prophet of the time of Nebuchadnezzar and Cyrus, the hero and author of the Book of Daniel. 1. Early Life: We know nothing of the early life of Daniel, except what is recorded in the book bearing his name. Here it is said that he was one of the youths of royal or noble seed, who were carried captive by Nebuchadnezzar in the third year of Jehoiakim, king of Judah. These youths were without blemish, well-favored, skillful in all wisdom, endued with knowledge, and understanding science, and such as had ability to stand in the king's palace. The king commanded to teach them the knowledge and tongue of the Chaldeans; and appointed for them a daily portion of the king's food and of the wine which he drank. After having been thus nourished for three years, they were to stand before the king. Ashpenaz, the master or chief of the eunuchs, into whose hands they had been entrusted, following a custom of the time, gave to each of these youths a new and Babylonian name. To Daniel, he gave the name Belteshazzar. In Babylonian this name was probably Belu-lita-sharri-usur, which means "O Bel, protect thou the hostage of the king," a most appropriate name for one in the place which Daniel occupied as a hostage of Jehoiakim at the court of the king of Babylon. The youths were probably from 12 to 15 years of age at the time when they were carried captive. (For changes of names, compare Joseph changed to Zaphenath-paneah (Gen 41:45); Eliakim, to Jehoiakim (2 Ki 23:34); Mattaniah, to Zedekiah (2 Ki 24:17); and the tw names of the high priest Johanan's brother in the Sachau Papyri, i.e. Ostan and Anani.)...
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/D/DANIEL/


Daniel in Wikipedia (Hebrew: דָּנִיֵּאל, Modern Daniyyel Tiberian Dāniyyl ; Irish or Gaelic Language Dainal or Domhnall; Syriac: ܕܢܝܐܝܠ, Daniyel; Arabic: دانيال, Persian: دانيال, Dniyal or Danial, also Dani, داني ; Danyal; Greek: Δανιήλ, Dhanil; Russian: Даниил, Daniil; Chinese: Protestant:但以理, Dnyǐlǐ/ Catholic:达尼尔, dněr) is the central protagonist of the Book of Daniel. The name "Daniel" means "God is my judge": Dan means "judgment" or "he judged", "i" is the hiriq compaginis meaning "of" (not to be confused with the modern Hebrew first person possessive suffix -i), and "El" means God. According to the Biblical book of Daniel, at a young age Daniel was carried off to Babylon where he was trained in the service of the court under the authority of Ashpenaz. It is also written that Daniel became famous for interpreting dreams and rose to become one of the most important figures in the court and lived well into the reign of the Persian conquerors. Some Christian denominations regard Daniel as a saint and as prophet. Judaism considers the Book of Daniel a part of its canon (Jewish Law), but does not regard Daniel as a prophet. Islam also regards Daniel as a prophet, though he is not mentioned explicitly in the Quran...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel


Daniel Scripture - Daniel 12:5 Then I Daniel looked, and, behold, there stood other two, the one on this side of the bank of the river, and the other on that side of the bank of the river.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Daniel/12/


Daniel Scripture - Daniel 2:24 Therefore Daniel went in unto Arioch, whom the king had ordained to destroy the wise [men] of Babylon: he went and said thus unto him; Destroy not the wise [men] of Babylon: bring me in before the king, and I will shew unto the king the interpretation.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Daniel/2/


Daniel Scripture - Daniel 4:19 Then Daniel, whose name [was] Belteshazzar, was astonied for one hour, and his thoughts troubled him. The king spake, and said, Belteshazzar, let not the dream, or the interpretation thereof, trouble thee. Belteshazzar answered and said, My lord, the dream [be] to them that hate thee, and the interpretation thereof to thine enemies.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Daniel/4/


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