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May 24    Scripture

Bible Names A-G: Amon


Amon in Easton's Bible Dictionary builder. (1.) The governor of Samaria in the time of Ahab. The prophet Micaiah was committed to his custody (1 Kings 22:26; 2 Chr. 18:25). (2.) The son of Manasseh, and fourteenth king of Judah. He restored idolatry, and set up the images which his father had cast down. Zephaniah (1:4; 3:4, 11) refers to the moral depravity prevailing in this king's reign. He was assassinated (2 Kings 21:18-26: 2 Chr. 33:20- 25) by his own servants, who conspired against him. (3.) An Egyptian god, usually depicted with a human body and the head of a ram, referred to in Jer. 46:25, where the word "multitudes" in the Authorized Version is more appropriately rendered "Amon" in the Revised Version. In Nah. 3:8 the expression "populous No" of the Authorized version is rendered in the Revised Version "No-amon." Amon is identified with Ra, the sun-god of Heliopolis. (4.) Neh. 7:59.
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/A/Amon/


Amon in Fausset's Bible Dictionary 1. Son and successor of Manasseh in the throne of Judah ("skillful in his art", Hebrew). Possibly the name was given by Manasseh, when an idolater, from the Egyptian god. He reigned from 642 B.C. to 640 (2 Kings 21:19; 2 Chronicles 33:20). His own servants conspired and slew him in his own house, and in their turn were slain by the people, who raised his son Josiah to the throne. 2. Governor of the city under Ahab (1 Kings 22:26).
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/A/Amon+(2)/


Amon in Hitchcock's Bible Names faithful; true
http://www.bible-history.com/hitchcock/A/Amon/


Amon in Naves Topical Bible 1. Governor of the city of Samaria 1Ki 22:26; 2Ch 18:25 -2. King of Judah 2Ki 21:18-26; 2Ch 33:21-25; Zep 1:1; Mt 1:10 -3. Ancestor of one of the families of the Nethinim Ne 7:59 Called Ami Ezr 2:57
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/A/AMON/


Amon in Smiths Bible Dictionary (builder). 1. One of Ahab's governors. 1Ki 22:26; 2Ch 18:25 2. King of Judah, son and successor of Manasseh, reigned two years, from B.C. 642 to 640. Amon devoted himself wholly to the service of false gods, but was killed in a conspiracy, and was succeeded by his son Josiah.
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/A/Amon/


Amon in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE a'-mon ('amon): A name identical with that of the Egyptian local deity of Thebes (No); compare Jer 46:25. The foreign name given to a Hebrew prince is remarkable, as is also the fact that it is one of the two or three royal names of Judah not compounded with the name of Yahweh. See MANASSEH. It seems to reflect the sentiment which his fanatical father sought to make prevail that Yahweh had no longer any more claim to identification with the realm than had other deities. (1) A king of Judah, son and successor of Manasseh; reigned two years and was assassinated in his own palace by the officials of his household. The story of his reign is told briefly in 2 Ki 21:19-26, and still more briefly, though in identical terms, so far as they go, in 2 Ch 33:21-25. His short reign was merely incidental in the history of Judah; just long enough to reveal the traits and tendencies which directly or indirectly led to his death. It was merely a weaker continuation of the regime of his idolatrous father, though without the fanaticism which gave the father positive character, and without the touch of piety which, if the Chronicler's account is correct, tempered the father's later years. If the assassination was the initial act of a revolution the latter was immediately suppressed by "the people of the land," who put to death the conspirators and placed Amon's eight-year-old son Josiah on the throne. In the view of the present writer the motive of the affair was probably connected with the perpetuity of the Davidic dynasty, which, having survived so long according to prophetic prediction (compare 2 Sam 7:16; Ps 89:36,37), was an essential guarantee of Yahweh's favor. Manasseh's foreign sympathies, however, had loosened the hold of Yahweh on the officials of his court; so that, instead of being the loyal center of devotion to Israel's religious and national idea, the royal household was but a hotbed of worldly ambitions, and all the more for Manasseh's prosperous reign, so long immune from any stroke of Divine judgment. It is natural that, seeing the insignificance of Amon's administration, some ambitious clique, imitating the policy that had frequently succeeded in the Northern Kingdom, should strike for the throne. They had reckoned, however, without estimating the inbred Davidic loyalty of the body of the people. It was a blow at one of their most cherished tenets, committing the nation both politically and religiously to utter uncertainty. That this impulsive act of the people was in the line of the purer religious movement which was ripening in Israel does not prove that the spiritually-minded "remnant" was minded to violence and conspiracy, it merely shows what a stern and sterling fiber of loyalty still existed, seasoned and confirmed by trial below the corrupting cults and fashions of the ruling classes. In the tragedy of Amon's reign, in short, we get a glimpse of the basis of sound principle that lay at the common heart of Israel. (2) A governor of Samaria (1 Ki 22:26); the one to whom the prophet Micaiah was committed as a prisoner by King Ahab, after the prophet had disputed the predictions of the court prophets and foretold the king's death in battle. (3) The head of the "children of Solomon's servants" (Neh 7:59) who returned from captivity; reckoned along with the Nethinim, or temple slaves. Called also Ami (Ezr 2:57).
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/A/AMON/


Amon of Judah in Wikipedia (Hebrew: אָמוֹן, Modern {{{2}}} Tiberian {{{3}}}; Greek: Αμων; Latin: Amon) was the king of Judah who succeeded his father Manasseh of Judah on the throne according to the Bible. His mother was Meshullemeth, daughter of Haruz of Jotbah. He was married to Jedidah, the daughter of Adaiah of Bozkath. Amon began his reign at the age of 22, and reigned for two years. (2 Kings 21:18-19 ) William F. Albright has dated his reign to 642-640 BC, while E. R. Thiele offers the dates 643/642 641/640 BC.[1] Amon continued his father's practice of idolatry, and set up the images as his father had done.Zephaniah 1:4 (also 3:4 , and 11) describes his reign as marked by moral depravity. He was assassinated (2 Kings 21:18-26 , 2 Chronicles 33:20- 25 ) by his servants, who conspired against him, and was succeeded by his son Josiah, who was eight years old. (2 Kings 22:1 ) At the end of Amon's reign, the international situation was in flux: to the east, the Assyrian Empire was beginning to disintegrate, the Babylonian Empire had not yet risen to replace it, and Egypt to the west was still recovering from Assyrian rule. In this power vacuum, Jerusalem was able to govern itself without foreign intervention. He is also one of the kings mentioned in the genealogy of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew. Thiele's dates for Amon are tied to the dates for his son Josiah, who reigned 31 years (2 Kings 22:1). Josiah's death at the hands of Pharaoh Necho II occurred in the summer of 609 BC.[2] By Judean reckoning that began regnal years in the fall month of Tishri, this would be in the year 610/609 BC. Amon's last year, 31 years earlier, then calculates as 641/640 BC and his first year as 643/642 BC.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amon_of_Judah


Amon Scripture - 2 Chronicles 33:25 But the people of the land slew all them that had conspired against king Amon; and the people of the land made Josiah his son king in his stead.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/2+Chronicles/33/


Amon Scripture - 2 Kings 21:24 And the people of the land slew all them that had conspired against king Amon; and the people of the land made Josiah his son king in his stead.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/2+Kings/21/


Amon Scripture - Nehemiah 7:59 The children of Shephatiah, the children of Hattil, the children of Pochereth of Zebaim, the children of Amon.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Nehemiah/7/


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