Ark of the Covenant - Bible History Online

Bible History Online

Sub Categories
1 Chronicles
1 Corinthians
1 John
1 Kings
1 Peter
1 Samuel
1 Thessalonians
1 Timothy
2 Chronicles
2 Corinthians
2 John
2 Kings
2 Peter
2 Samuel
2 Thessalonians
2 Timothy
3 John
Acts
Amos
Colossians
Daniel
Deuteronomy
Ecclesiastes
Ephesians
Esther
Exodus
Ezekiel
Ezra
Galatians
Genesis
Habakkuk
Haggai
Hebrews
Hosea
Isaiah
James
Jeremiah
Job
Joel
John
Jonah
Joshua
Jude
Judges
Lamentations
Leviticus
Luke
Malachi
Mark
Matthew
Micah
Nahum
Nehemiah
Numbers
Obadiah
Philemon
Philippians
Proverbs
Psalms
Revelation
Romans
Ruth
Song of Solomon
Titus
Zechariah
Zephaniah

Back to Categories

March 28    Scripture

Bible Books: Micah
The Book of Micah in the Bible

Micah in the Bible. Messiah will be born in Bethlehem (House of Bread). Description of the complete moral decay in all levels of Israel. God will judge but will forgive and restore. Bethlehem will be the birthplace of the Messiah. -Outline of the Books of the Bible

MICAH [OLD TESTAMENT] [PROPHETICAL] [MINOR PROPHETS]


Book of Micah in Easton's Bible Dictionary the sixth in order of the so-called minor prophets. The superscription to this book states that the prophet exercised his office in the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah. If we reckon from the beginning of Jotham's reign to the end of Hezekiah's (B.C. 759-698), then he ministered for about fifty-nine years; but if we reckon from the death of Jotham to the accession of Hezekiah (B.C. 743-726), his ministry lasted only sixteen years. It has been noticed as remarkable that this book commences with the last words of another prophet, "Micaiah the son of Imlah" (1 Kings 22:28): "Hearken, O people, every one of you." The book consists of three sections, each commencing with a rebuke, "Hear ye," etc., and closing with a promise, (1) ch. 1; 2; (2) ch. 3-5, especially addressed to the princes and heads of the people; (3) ch. 6-7, in which Jehovah is represented as holding a controversy with his people: the whole concluding with a song of triumph at the great deliverance which the Lord will achieve for his people. The closing verse is quoted in the song of Zacharias (Luke 1:72, 73). The prediction regarding the place "where Christ should be born," one of the most remarkable Messianic prophecies (Micah 5:2), is quoted in Matt. 2:6. There are the following references to this book in the New Testament: 5:2, with Matt. 2:6; John 7:42. 7:6, with Matt. 10:21,35,36. 7:20, with Luke 1:72,73.
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/M/Micah,+Book+of/


Book of Micah in Fausset's Bible Dictionary 1. Of Mount Ephraim. (See JONATHAN.) The date of the event is implied as before Samson, for the origin of the name Mahaneh Dan occurs in this narrative (Judges 18:12) and it is mentioned as already so named in Samson's childhood (Judges 13:25, margin). Josephus places the synchronous narrative of the Levite and his concubine at the beginning of the judges. Phinehas, Aaron's grandson, is mentioned (Judges 20:28). The narrative was written after the monarchy had begun (Judges 18:1; Judges 19:1), while the tabernacle was still at Shiloh, not yet moved by David to Jerusalem (Judges 18:81). 2. MICAH THE PROPHET. The oldest form of the name was Mikaiahuw, "who is as Jah?" (compare MICHAEL.) In Micah 7:18 Micah alludes to the meaning of his name as embodying the most precious truth to a guilty people such as he had painted the Jews, "who is a God like unto Thee that pardon iniquity," etc. Sixth of the minor prophets in the Hebrew canon, third in the Septuagint. The Morasthite, i.e. of Moresheth, or Moresheth Gath (near Gath in S.W. of Judaea), where once was his tomb, but in Jerome's (Ep. Paulae 6) days a church, not far from Eleutheropolis. Micah prophesied in the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah somewhere between 756 and 697 B.C. Contemporary with Isaiah in Judah, with whose prophecies his have a close connection (compare Micah 4:1-3 with Isaiah 2:2-4, the latter stamping the former as inspired), and with Hosea and Amos during their later ministry in Israel. His earlier prophecies under Jotham and Ahaz were collected and written out as one whole under Hezekiah. Probably the book was read before the assembled king and people on some fast or festival, as certain elders quoted to the princes and people assembled against Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26:18) Micah 3:12, "Micah the Morasthite in the days of Hezekiah, and spoke to all the people of Judah, Thus saith the Lord of hosts, Zion shall be plowed like a field, and Jerusalem shall become heaps, and the mountain of the house as the high places of a forest. Did Hezekiah put him ... to death? Did he not fear the Lord and besought the Lord, and the Lord repented Him of the evil which He had pronounced against them?" The idolatries of Ahaz' reign accord with Micah 's denunciations. He prophesies partly against Israel (Samaria), partly against Judah...
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/M/Micah,+the+book+of/


Book of Micah in Wikipedia Micah of Moresheth (most likely the same city as Moresheth- Gath, mentioned in Micah) prophesied during the days of King Hezekiah of Judah. This paraphrase of Jeremiah 26:18 contains practically everything we know of the Prophet himself. Moresheth-Gath was most likely a small town in southwestern Judah, though this has yet to be confirmed. Some scholars argue over how much of the book of Micah can be attributed to Micah himself. There is general consensus that the majority of chapters 1–3 are in fact Micah’s own (excluding 2:12–13). The remaining passages are seen by some as redactions. This will be further argued in the section on controversy. Some Old Testament scholars, for example Dr Bruce Waltke in IVP`s 'New Bible Commentary', defend Micah's authorship of the entire book. It is generally agreed that Micah composed chapters 1 through 3; some scholars hold that chapter 6 and sections of chapter 7 were also written by the historical Micah. The primary reasons given are because chapters 3–5 foretell of events in the 6th century BCE and chapters 6–7 have elements of a universal religious outlook which was not widely present in Judaism until much later...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Micah


Chart of the Prophets of Israel and Judah God raised up certain "prophets" who were His mouthpieces. They would speak out against their sin and idolatry and would continually warn of God's judgment. Some of the prophets spoke out in the North and some in the South, but God was faithfully warning them of certain catastrophe if they would not turn to him.
http://www.bible-history.com/black-obelisk/kings-prophets.html


Micah in Easton's Bible Dictionary a shortened form of Micaiah, who is like Jehovah? (1.) A man of Mount Ephraim, whose history so far is introduced in Judg. 17, apparently for the purpose of leading to an account of the settlement of the tribe of Dan in Northern Israel, and for the purpose also of illustrating the lawlessness of the times in which he lived (Judg. 18; 19:1-29; 21:25). (2.) The son of Merib-baal (Mephibosheth), 1 Chr. 8:34, 35. (3.) The first in rank of the priests of the family of Kohathites (1 Chr. 23:20). (4.) A descendant of Joel the Reubenite (1 Chr. 5:5). (5.) "The Morasthite," so called to distinguish him from Micaiah, the son of Imlah (1 Kings 22:8). He was a prophet of Judah, a contemporary of Isaiah (Micah 1:1), a native of Moresheth of Gath (1:14, 15). Very little is known of the circumstances of his life (comp. Jer. 26:18, 19).
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/M/Micah/


Micah in Smiths Bible Dictionary (who is like God?), the same name as Micaiah. [MICAIAH] 1. An Israelite whose familiar story is preserved in the 17th and 18th chapters of Judges. Micah is evidently a devout believers in Jehovah, and yet so completely ignorant is he of the law of Jehovah that the mode which he adopts of honoring him is to make a molten and graven image, teraphim or images of domestic gods, and to set up an unauthorized priesthood, first in his own family, Jud 17:5 and then in the person of a Levite not of the priestly line. ver. Jud 17:12 A body of 600 Danites break in upon and steal his idols from him. 2. The sixth in order of the minor prophets. He is called the Morasthite, that is, a native of Moresheth, a small village near Eleutheropolis to the east, where formerly the prophet's tomb was shown, though in the days of Jerome it had been succeeded by a church. Micah exercised the prophetical office during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, giving thus a maximum limit of 59 years, B.C. 756-697, from the accession of Jotham to the death of Hezekiah, and a minimum limit of 16 years, B.C. 742-726, from the death of Jotham to the accession of Hezekiah. He was contemporary with Hosea and Amos during the part of their ministry in Israel, and with Isaiah in Judah. 3. A descendant of Joel the Reubenite. 1Ch 5:5 4. The son of Meribbaal or Mephibosheth, the son of Jonathan. 1Ch 8:34,35; 9:40,41 5. A Kohathite levite, the eldest son of Uzziel the brother of Amram. 1Ch 23:30 6. The father of Abdon, a man of high station in the reign of Josiah. 2Ch 34:20
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/M/Micah/


Micah in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE 4. Contents of the Prophecies: Micah combats in his discourses, as does Isaiah, the heathenish abuses which had found their way into the cult, not only in Samaria, but also in Judah and Jerusalem, and which the reformation of Hezekiah could counteract only in part and not at all permanently (compare Mic 1:5-7; 5:11-13; 6:7,16). Further, he rebukes them for the social injustice, of which particularly the powerful and the great in the land were guilty (Mic 2:1 ff; 3:2 f.10 f); and the dishonesty and unfaithfulness in business and in conduct in general (compare Mic 6:10 ff; 7:2 ff). At all times Micah, in doing this, was compelled to defend himself against false prophets, who slighted these charges as of little importance, and threatened and antagonized the prophet in his announcements of impending evil (compare 2:5 ff,11 ff). In pronounced opposition to these babblers and their predictions of good things, Micah announces the judgment through the enemies that are approaching, and he even goes beyond Isaiah in the open declaration that Jerusalem and the temple are to be destroyed (Mic 3:12; 4:10; 5:1). The first- mentioned passage is also confirmed by the event reported in Jer 26:17 ff. The passage Mic 4:10, where in a surprising way Babylon is mentioned as the place of the exile, is for this reason regarded as unauthentic by the critics, but not justly. Micah predicts also the deliverance from Babylon and the reestablishment of Israel in Jerusalem, and declares that this is to take place through a King who shall come forth from the deepest humiliation of the house of David and shall be born in Bethlehem, and who, like David, originally a simple shepherd boy, shall later become the shepherd of the people, and shall make his people happy in peace and prosperity. Against this King the last great onslaught of the Gentiles will avail nothing (4:11-13; 5:4 ff). As a matter of course, he will purify the country of all heathen abuses (5:9 ff). In the description of this ruler, Micah again agrees with Isaiah, but without taking the details from that prophet...
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/M/MICAH+(2)/


The Book of Micah in Smiths Bible Dictionary Three sections of this work represent three natural divisions of the prophecy --1, 2; 3-5; 6,7 --each commencing with rebukes and threatening and closing with a promise. The first section opens with a magnificent description of the coming of Jehovah to judgment for the sins and idolatries of Israel and Judah, ch. 1:2-4, and the sentence pronounced upon Samaria, vs. 5-9, by the Judge himself. The sentence of captivity is passed upon them. Mic 2:10 but is followed instantly by a promise of restoration and triumphant return. ch. Mic 2:12,13 The second section is addressed especially to the princes and heads of the people: their avarice and rapacity are rebuked in strong terms; but the threatening is again succeeded by a promise of restoration. In the last section, chs. 6,7, Jehovah, by a bold poetical figure, is represented as holding a controversy with his people, pleading with them in justification of his conduct toward them and the reasonableness of his requirements. The whole concludes with a triumphal song of joy at the great deliverance, like that from Egypt, which jehovah will achieve, and a full acknowledgment of his mercy and faithfulness of his promises. vs. 16-20. The last verse is reproduced in the song of Zacharias. Lu 1:72,73 Micah's prophecies are distinct and clear. He it is who says that the Ruler shall spring from Bethlehem. ch. Lu 5:2 His style has been compared with that of Hosea and Isaiah. His diction is vigorous and forcible, sometimes obscure from the abruptness of its transitions, but varied and rich.
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/M/Micah,+The+book+of/


If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2016 Bible History Online





More Bible History