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Bible Books: Jeremiah
The Book of Jeremiah in the Bible

Jeremiah in the Bible. A Final Call for Israel's Repentance. Called by God to plead with the people to repent and to proclaim the news of judgment to Judah, which came. God's plan for a New Covenant built upon better promises. -Outline of the Books of the Bible

JEREMIAH [OLD TESTAMENT] [PROPHETICAL] [MAJOR PROPHETS]


Author of the Book of Jeremiah Author - Jeremiah (According to the Bible and Jewish Tradition). The book of Jeremiah is recognized as his own writings and a complete book just like the book of Isaiah. In Jeremiah 36:1-2, 4, 8, 32 it is written that Jeremiah collected his own writings and prophecies, some speculate that he put the book together with Baruch in the land of Egypt but there is no way to know for certain.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofjeremiah.html

Book of Jeremiah in Easton's Bible Dictionary consists of twenty-three separate and independent sections, arranged in five books. I. The introduction, ch. 1. II. Reproofs of the sins of the Jews, consisting of seven sections, (1.) ch. 2; (2.) ch. 3-6; (3.) ch. 7-10; (4.) ch. 11-13; (5.) ch. 14-17:18; (6.) ch. 17:19-ch. 20; (7.) ch. 21-24. III. A general review of all nations, in two sections, (1.) ch. 46- 49; (2.) ch. 25; with an historical appendix of three sections, (1.) ch. 26; (2.) ch. 27; (3.) ch. 28, 29. IV. Two sections picturing the hopes of better times, (1.) ch. 30, 31; (2.) ch. 32,33; to which is added an historical appendix in three sections, (1.) ch. 34:1-7; (2.) ch. 34:8-22; (3.) ch. 35. V. The conclusion, in two sections, (1.) ch. 36; (2.) ch. 45. In Egypt, after an interval, Jeremiah is supposed to have added three sections, viz., ch. 37-39; 40-43; and 44. The principal Messianic prophecies are found in 23:1-8; 31:31-40; and 33:14-26. Jeremiah's prophecies are noted for the frequent repetitions found in them of the same words and phrases and imagery. They cover the period of about 30 years. They are not recorded in the order of time. When and under what circumstances this book assumed its present form we know not. The LXX. Version of this book is, in its arrangement and in other particulars, singularly at variance with the original. The LXX. omits 10:6-8; 27:19-22; 29:16-20; 33:14-26; 39:4-13; 52:2, 3, 15, 28-30, etc. About 2,700 words in all of the original are omitted. These omissions, etc., are capricious and arbitrary, and render the version unreliable.
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/J/Jeremiah,+Book+of/

Book of Jeremiah in Smiths Bible Dictionary "There can be little doubt that the book of Jeremiah grew out of the roll which Baruch wrote down at the prophet's mouth in the fourth year of Jehoiakim. ch. Jer 36:2 Apparently the prophets kept written records of their predictions, and collected into larger volumes such of them as were intended for permanent use." --Canon Cook. In the present order we have two great divisions:-- I. Chs. 1-45. Prophecies delivered at various times, directed mainly to Judah, or connected with Jeremiah's personal history. II. Chs. 46-51. Prophecies connected with other nations. Looking more closely into each of these divisions, we have the following sections: 1. Chs. 1-21, including prophecies from the thirteenth year of Josiah to the fourth of Jehoiakim; ch. 21; belongs to the later period. 2. Chs. 22-25. Shorter prophecies, delivered at different times, against the kings of Judah and the false prophets. Ch. Jer 25:13,14 evidently marks the conclusion of a series of prophecies; and that which follows, ch. Jer 25:15-38 the germ of the fuller predictions in chs. 46-49, has been placed here as a kind of completion to the prophecy of the seventy years and the subsequent fall of Babylon. 3. Chs. 26-28. The two great prophecies of the fall of Jerusalem, and the history connected with them. 4. Chs. 29-31. The message of comfort for the exiles in Babylon. 5. Chs. 32-44. The history of the last two years before the capture of Jerusalem, and of Jeremiah's work int hem and in the period that followed. 6. Chs. 46-51. The prophecies against foreign nations, ending with the great prediction against Babylon. 7. The supplementary narrative of ch. 52.
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/J/Jeremiah,+Book+of/

Book of Jeremiah in Wikipedia The Book of Jeremiah, or Jeremiah (יִרְמְיָהוּ Yirməyāhū in Hebrew), is part of the Hebrew Bible, Judaism's Tanakh, and later became a part of Christianity's Old Testament. It was originally written in a complex and poetic Hebrew (apart from verse 10:11, curiously written in Biblical Aramaic), recording the words and events surrounding the life of the Jewish prophet Jeremiah who lived at the time of the destruction of Solomon's Temple (587/6 BC) in Jerusalem during the fall of the Kingdom of Judah at the hands of Babylonia...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Jeremiah

Chart of the Prophets of Israel and Judah God raised up certain "prophets" who were His mouthpieces. They would speak out against their sin and idolatry and would continually warn of God's judgment. Some of the prophets spoke out in the North and some in the South, but God was faithfully warning them of certain catastrophe if they would not turn to him.
http://www.bible-history.com/black-obelisk/kings-prophets.html

Date and Time Period of the Book of Jeremiah Date - 629 BC Approximately. The prophet Jeremiah began his ministry during the reign of King Josiah, and he prophesied the Word of the Lord until the destruction of Jerusalem in 586 BC when Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon came and destroyed the city and her Temple (Jeremiah 1), and he continued to prophesy even after this event.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofjeremiah.html

Epistle of Jeremy in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE LITERATURE 1. Name: In manuscripts Vaticanus and Alexandrinus the title is simply "An Epistle of Jeremiah." But in Codex Vaticanus, etc., there is a superscription introducing the letter: "Copy of a letter which Jeremiah sent to the captives about to be led to Babylon by (Peshitta adds Nebuchadnezzar) the king of the Babylonians, to make known to them what had been commanded him by God." What follows is a satirical exposure of the folly of idolatry, and not a letter. The idea of introducing this as a letter from Jeremiah was probably suggested by Jer 29:1 ff. 2. Canonicity and Position: The early Greek Fathers were on the whole favorably disposed toward this tract, reckoning it to be a part of the Canon. It is therefore included in the lists of Canonical writings of Origen, Epiphanius, Cyril of Jerusalem and Athanasius, and it was so authoritatively recognized by the Council of Laodicea (360 AD). In most Greek manuscripts of the Septuagint (Codices Alexandrinus and Vaticanus. March, Chisl, in the Syriac Hexateuch), it follows Lamentations as an independent piece, closing the supposed writings of Jeremiah. In the bestknown printed of the Septuagint (Tischendorf, Swete, etc.), the order is Jeremiah, Baruch, Lain, Epistle of Jeremy. In Fritzsche, Lib. Apocrypha VT Graece, Epistle Jeremiah stands between Baruch and Tobit. But in Latin manuscripts, including those of the Vulgate, it is appended to Baruch, of which it forms chapter 6, though it really has nothing to do with that book. This last is the case with Protestant editions (English versions of the Bible, etc.) of the Apocrypha, a more intelligible arrangement, since Jeremiah and Lamentations do not occur in the Apocrypha, and the Biblical Baruch was Jeremiah's amanuensis. 3. Contents: In the so-called letter (see 1, above) the author shows the absurdity and wickedness of heathen worship. The Jews, for their sins, will be removed to Babylon, where they will remain 7 generations. In that land they will be tempted to worship the gods o f the people. The writer's aim is ostensibly to warn them beforehand by showing how helpless and useless the idols worshipped are, and how immoral as well as silly the rites of the Bah religion are. For similar polemics against idolatry, see Isa 44:9-19 (which in its earnestness resembles the Epistle Jeremiah closely); Jer 10:3-9; Ps 115:4-8; 135:15-18; The Wisdom of Solomon 13:10- 19; 15:13-17...
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/J/JEREMY,+THE+EPISTLE+OF/

Greek Name of the Book of Jeremiah Greek Name - Ieremias (Greek form of the Hebrew)
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofjeremiah.html

Hebrew Name and Meaning of the Book of Jeremiah Hebrew Name - Yirmiyahu "Yah is my appointer"
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofjeremiah.html

History of the Book of Jeremiah The prophet Jeremiah began his ministry during the reign of King Josiah, and he prophesied the Word of the Lord until the destruction of Jerusalem in 586 BC when Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon came and destroyed the city and her Temple (Jeremiah 1), and he continued to prophesy even after this event. Jeremiah began ministering in 627 BC during the reign of King Josiah, he was the "son of Hilkiah, of the priests that were in Anathoth" which was a city near Jerusalem. When the Lord called him he was very young (Jeremiah 1:6), and the Lord revealed to him that his word would be rejected and yet he was not to be afraid of their faces. They also learned that an enemy from the North would come and bring about the destruction of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 1:11-16), and this time it would not be the Assyrians as with the northern kingdom of Israel, but it would be the Babylonians. All the kings who reigned during the time of Jeremiah were: Josiah, Jehoa-haz, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin and Zedekiah and Jerusalem was destroyed in the 11th year of the reign of king Zedekiah in 586 BC. The event of the burning of the city of Jerusalem and of the Temple of Solomon is found in 2 Kings 25:8,9 and Jeremiah 52:12-13. Jeremiah was quick to obey God and to reveal to the children of Israel in Judah their sins, and as God had warned him he was hated with much hostility both in his hometown of Anathoth and in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 11:18-23). It even indicates that his own family "dealt treacherously" with him (Jeremiah 12:6), but this was a calm before the storm for Jeremiah who was known as the weeping prophet. Because of his fearless prophesying during the reigns of the next four kings of Judah, and the fact that he predicted the destruction of Jerusalem because of the people's sins he was hated all the more. He went into hiding because of the wrath of Jehoiakim who had cut up his book of prophecies and burned them. Judah finally went into a first wave of captivity by the Babylonians under Jehoiachin, and they placed Zedekiah in his stead as a puppet king. Eventually Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon but was warned by Jeremiah not to do so (Jeremiah 27:12). Finally the inevitable happened, on the terrifying day of Av 9 in the Jewish calendar Nebuchadnezzar's forces destroyedthe Temple of Solomon and the city of Jerusalem making true all of Jeremiah's prophecies about the Babylonian invasion. Jeremiah stayed in Jerusalem but finally was forced to go to Egypt and his companion and secretary, Baruch came with him. They are in Egypt, in the city of Tahpanhes we have the last mention of Jeremiah's life, and after this there is no information and nothing is certain. His book was completed and he lived a very long life. According to Christian tradition the Jews at Tahpanhes, hating him for his prophecies stoned him to death. There is also a Jewish tradition that when Nebuchadnezzar had conquered Egypt, Jeremiah and Baruch had escaped to the land of Judea where they were allowed to die in peace.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofjeremiah.html

Jeremiah (1) in Smiths Bible Dictionary (whom Jehovah has appointed) was "the son of Hilkiah of the priests that were in Anathoth." Jer 1:1 1. History. --He was called very young (B.C. 626) to the prophetic office, and prophesied forty-two years; but we have hardly any mention of him during the eighteen years between his call and Josiah's death, or during the short reign of Jehoahaz. During the reigns of Jehoiakim and Jehoiachin, B.C. 607-598, he opposed the Egyptian party, then dominant in Jerusalem, and maintained that they only way of safety lay in accepting the supremacy of the Chaldeans. He was accordingly accused of treachery, and men claiming to be prophets had the "word of Jehovah" to set against his. Jer 14:13; 23:7 As the danger from the Chaldeans became more threatening, the persecution against Jeremiah grew hotter. ch. 18. The people sought his life; then follows the scene in Jer 19:10-13 he was set, however, "as a fenced brazen wall," ch. Jer 15:20 and went on with his work, reproving king and nobles and people. The danger which Jeremiah had so long foretold at last came near. First Jehoiakim, and afterwards his successor Jehoiachin, were carried into exile, 2Kin 24; but Zedekiah, B.C. 597-586, who was appointed by Nebuchadnezzar, was more friendly to the prophet, though powerless to help him. The approach of an Egyptian army, and the consequent departure of the Chaldeans, made the position of Jeremiah full of danger, and he sought to effect his escape from the city; but he was seized and finally thrown into a prison-pit to die, but was rescued. On the return of the Chaldean army he showed his faith in God's promises, and sought to encourage the people by purchasing the field at Anathoth which his kinsman Hanameel wished to get rid of. Jer 32:6-9 At last the blow came. The city was taken, the temple burnt. The king and his princes shared the fate of Jehoiachin. The prophet gave utterance to his sorrow in the Lamentations. After the capture of Jerusalem, B.C. 586, by the Chaldeans, we find Jeremiah receiving better treatment; but after the death of Gedaliah, the people, disregarding his warnings, took refuge in Egypt, carrying the prophet with them. In captivity his words were sharper and stronger than ever. He did not shrink, even there, from speaking of the Chaldean king once more as "the servant of Jehovah." Jer 43:10 After this all is uncertain, but he probably died in Egypt...
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/J/Jeremiah+(1)/

Jeremiah (1) in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE jer-e-mi'-a ((a) yirmeyahu, or (b) shorter form, yirmeyah, both differently explained as "Yah establishes (so Giesebrecht), whom Yahweh casts," i.e. possibly, as Gesenius suggests, "appoints" (A. B. Davidson in HDB, II, 569a), and "Yahweh looseneth" (the womb); see BDB): The form (b) is used of Jeremiah the prophet only in Jer 27:1; 28:5,6,10,11,12b,15; 29:1; Ezr 1:1; Dan 9:2, while the other is found 116 times in Jeremiah alone. In 1 Esdras 1:28,32,47,57; 2 Esdras 2:18, English Versions of the Bible has "Jeremy," so the King James Version in 2 Macc 2:1,5,7; Mt 2:17; 27:9; in Mt 16:14, the King James Version has "Jeremias," but the Revised Version (British and American) in 2 Maccabees and Matthew has "Jeremiah." (1) The prophet. See special article. Of the following, (2), (3) and (4) have form (a) above; the others the form (b). (2) Father of Hamutal (Hamital), the mother of King Jehoahaz and King Jehoiakim (2 Ki 23:31; 24:18 parallel Jer 52:1). (3) A Rechabite (Jer 35:3). (4) In 1 Ch 12:13 (Hebrew 14), a Gadite. (5) In 1 Ch 12:10 (Hebrew 11), a Gadite. (6) In 1 Ch 12:4 (Hebrew 5), a Benjamite(?) or Judean. (4), (5) and (6) all joined David at Ziklag. (7) Head of a Manassite family (1 Ch 5:24). (8) A priest who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah (Neh 10:2), probably the same as he of 12:34 who took part in the procession at the dedication of the walls of Jerusalem. (9) A priest who went to Jerusalem with Zerubbabel from exile and became head of a priestly family of that name (Neh 12:1). David Francis Roberts
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Jeremiah (2) in Smiths Bible Dictionary Seven other persons bearing the same name as the prophet are mentioned in the Old Testament:-- 1. Jeremiah of Libnah, father of Hamutal wife of Josiah. 2Ki 23:31 (B.C. before 632.) 2,3,4. Three warriors --two of the tribe of Gad-- in David's army. 1Ch 12:4,10,13 (B.C. 1061-53.) 5. One of the "mighty men of valor" of the transjordanic half-tribe of Manasseh. 1Ch 5:24 (B.C. 782.) 6. A priest of high rank, head of the second or third of the twenty-one courses which are apparently enumerated in Ne 10:2-8; 12:1,12 (B.C. 446-410). 7. The father of Jazaniah the Rechabite. Jer 35:3 (B.C. before 606.)
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/J/Jeremiah+(2)/

Jeremiah (2) in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE LITERATURE 1. Name and Person: The name of one of the greatest prophets of Israel. The Hebrew yirmeyahu, abbreviated to yirmeyah, signifies either "Yahweh hurls" or "Yahweh founds." Septuagint reads Iermias, and the Vulgate (Jerome's Latin Bible, 390-405 A.D.) Jeremias. As this name also occurs not infrequently, the prophet is called "the son of Hilkiah" (Jer 1:1), who is, however, not the high priest mentioned in 2 Ki 22 and 23, as it is merely stated that he was "of the priests that were in Anathoth" in the land of Benjamin In Anathoth, now Anata, a small village 3 miles Northeast of Jerusalem, lived a class of priests who belonged to a side line, not to the line of Zadok (compare 1 Ki 2:26). 2. Life of Jeremiah: Jeremiah was called by the Lord to the office of a prophet while still a youth (1:6) about 20 years of age, in the 13th year of King Josiah (1:2; 25:3), in the year 627 BC, and was active in this capacity from this time on to the destruction of Jerusalem, 586 BC, under kings Josiah, Jehoahaz, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, and Zedekiah. Even after the fall of the capital city he prophesied in Egypt at least for several years, so that his work extended over a period of about 50 years in all. At first he probably lived in Anathoth, and put in his appearance publicly in Jerusalem only on the occasion of the great festivals; later he lived in Jerusalem, and was there during the terrible times of the siege and the destruction of the city...
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/J/JEREMIAH+(2)/

Main Prophecies in the Book of Jeremiah 1) The impending destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon; 2) the possibility of averting this destruction by repentance; 3) the submitting to Babylonian rule after it becomes apparent that domination is inevitable; 4) Babylon herself will be destroyed, never to rise again; and 5) Judah will return from captivity and eventually achieve an unsurpassed glory.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofjeremiah.html

Outline of the Book of Jeremiah Quick Overview of Jeremiah. – –1 – – the call of Jeremiah– – 1-20– –Jeremiah's prophecies against Judah under the reigns of Josiah and Jehoiachim– – 21-39 – –Jeremiah's prophecies against Judah until the fall of Jerusalem– – 40-45 – – Jeremiah's prophecies after the fall of Jerusalem – – 46-51 – – Jeremiah's prophecies against the surrounding nations – – 52 – – the historical appendix.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofjeremiah.html

Summary of the Book of Jeremiah The prophet Jeremiah prophesied to the Jews in Jerusalem and Judah about 50 years before Jerusalem would fall and be destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon. Jeremiah continually preached against the folly of idolatry and pleaded with the people the Word of God, "what injustice have you found in me?" he cried, why have you gone far from me and followed idols, and have become idolaters?, I brought you into a beautiful country to eat of its fruit and its goodness, but you have defiled my land and made my heritage and abomination. Jeremiah warned that Jerusalem would be destroyed and the Jews would be taken away as captives to the land of Babylon. The words of Jeremiah were violently rejected and he was continually persecuted, but God warned them at the beginning of his ministry not to be afraid of their faces. While Jeremiah was in prison grieving over the sins of his people the Lord came to him and said "behold, the days are coming, says the Lord, when I will make a new covenant" (Jeremiah 31). Soon afterwards Jerusalem was indeed destroyed in 586 BC as Jeremiah prophesied. But he claimed that their captivity would only last 70 years and then they would return to their land. Jeremiah also prophesied against the pagan nations around Israel. Later he was forced to go and live in the land of Egypt and there is no record of what happened to him.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofjeremiah.html

The Book of Jeremiah in the Picture Study Bible Study Bible with information, images, and notes on many important subjects from the ancient world. Archaeological notes, geographical notes, ancient documents and manuscripts, cultural notes, theological notes, articles from scholars, information about ancient history, ancient customs, ancient temples, ancient monuments, and a close look at people, places, and events from the ancient world that are explained in an easy to understand format.
http://www.bible-history.com/studybible/Jeremiah/

Theme of the Book of Jeremiah Main Theme - The destruction of Judah
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofjeremiah.html

Type of Jesus in the Book of Jeremiah Types and Shadows - In Jeremiah Jesus is the Lord our righteousness
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