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February 27    Scripture

Bible Books: Ecclesiastes
The Book of Ecclesiastes in the Bible

Ecclesiastes in the Bible. The wisdom of man is futility. Vanity of Earthly Things. All is vanity. -Outline of the Books of the Bible

ECCLESIASTES [OLD TESTAMENT] [POETICAL]


Author of The Book of Ecclesiastes Author - Solomon (According to the Bible, Jesus, and Tradition). The book of Ecclesiastes was written by Solomon who was the wisest man in the world, and in fact he was the embodiment of pure wisdom.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofecclesiastes.html


Date of The Book of Ecclesiastes Date - 977 BC Approximately.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofecclesiastes.html


Ecclesiastes in Easton's Bible Dictionary the Greek rendering of the Hebrew _Koheleth_, which means "Preacher." The old and traditional view of the authorship of this book attributes it to Solomon. This view can be satisfactorily maintained, though others date it from the Captivity. The writer represents himself implicitly as Solomon (1:12). It has been appropriately styled The Confession of King Solomon. "The writer is a man who has sinned in giving way to selfishness and sensuality, who has paid the penalty of that sin in satiety and weariness of life, but who has through all this been under the discipline of a divine education, and has learned from it the lesson which God meant to teach him." "The writer concludes by pointing out that the secret of a true life is that a man should consecrate the vigour of his youth to God." The key-note of the book is sounded in ch. 1:2, "Vanity of vanities! saith the Preacher, Vanity of vanities! all is vanity!" i.e., all man's efforts to find happiness apart from God are without result.
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/E/Ecclesiastes/


Ecclesiastes in Smiths Bible Dictionary (the preacher). The title of this book is in Hebrew Koheleth, signifying one who speaks publicly in an assembly. Koheleth is the name by which Solomon, probably the author, speaks of himself throughout the book. The book is that which it professes to be, --the confession of a man of wide experience looking back upon his past life and looking out upon the disorders and calamities which surround him. The writer is a man who has sinned in giving way to selfishness and sensuality, who has paid the penalty of that sin in satiety and weariness of life, but who has through all this been under the discipline of a divine education, and has learned from it the lesson which God meant to teach him.
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/E/Ecclesiastes/


Ecclesiastes in Wikipedia Ecclesiastes (often abbreviated Ecc) (Hebrew: קֹהֶלֶת‎, Kohelet, variously transliterated as Kohelet, Qoheleth, Koheles, Koheleth, or Coheleth) is a book of the Hebrew Bible. The English name derives from the Greek translation of the Hebrew title. The main speaker in the book, identified by the name or title Qohelet, introduces himself as "son of David, and king in Jerusalem." The work consists of personal or autobiographic matter, at times expressed in aphorisms and maxims illuminated in terse paragraphs with reflections on the meaning of life and the best way of life. The work emphatically proclaims all the actions of man to be inherently "vain", "futile", "empty", "meaningless", "temporary", "transitory", or "fleeting," depending on translation, as the lives of both wise and foolish men end in death. While Qohelet clearly endorses wisdom as a means for a well-lived earthly life, he is unable to ascribe eternal meaning to it. In light of this perceived senselessness, he suggests that one should enjoy the simple pleasures of daily life, such as eating, drinking, and taking enjoyment in one's work, which are gifts from the hand of God...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecclesiastes


Greek Name of The Book of Ecclesiastes Greek Name - Ekklesiastes (Greek form of the Hebrew)
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofecclesiastes.html


Hebrew Name and Meaning of The Book of Ecclesiastes Hebrew Name - Qoheleth "the preacher"
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofecclesiastes.html


Outline of The Book of Ecclesiastes Quick Overview of Ecclesiastes. – –1:1-2:26 – – the preachers first sermon: the futility of human wisdom– – 3:1-5:20 – –the preachers second sermon: life's unfulfilling disappointments – – 6:1-8:17 – – the preachers third sermon: the futility of wealth and fame – – 9:1-12:8 – – the preachers fourth sermon: God is in control of the futility's in life – – 12:9-14 – – the preachers conclusion: true fulfillment in life comes from fearing God and obeying His Word.
http://www.bible-history.com/studybible/Ecclesiastes/


Solomon and Worldly Pleasure Solomon had thoroughly experienced all avenues of pleasure, all avenues of sensuality, all avenues of wealth, honor, folly, and the pursuit of knowledge. He also sinned in giving way to every excess of life which his position made possible and comes to the realization of the uselessness of it all. He concludes that the result of his efforts have been made him empty and that there is nothing new under the sun, but all is part of the endless, frustrating circularity. His attitude was spoken in the recurring phrase, "vanity of vanities, all is vanity, saith the preacher." In Ecclesiastes, the world is convicted of its vanity by one who has drunk of every spring.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofecclesiastes.html


Solomon's Conclusion The conclusion which Solomon "the preacher" reaches is that in such an empty and unsatisfying world where disappointment, trouble and death cannot be avoided, a quiet enjoyment of God's gifts is the only real wisdom. The man who is truly wise will "fear God and keep his commandments" (12:13-14), making the best of things as he finds them and trusting in the providence of God. This secret should be understood early in life. An understanding of this will provide one with great pleasure in life. The book of Ecclesiastes profoundly illustrates the idea that a life apart from God is a life without meaning.
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofecclesiastes.html


Solomon's Main Messages in The Book of Ecclesiastes Sermon 1: The vanity of human wisdom, Sermon 2: Appreciate the divine laws governing life, Sermon 3: There is no fulfillment in any earthly pleasures or wealth, Sermon 4: God will deal with the worlds injustices, Conclusion: fear the Lord and to obey his word.
http://www.bible-history.com/studybible/Ecclesiastes/


Summary of The Book of Ecclesiastes The word Ecclesiastes is the Greek equivalent for the Hebrew word Koheleth, or the preacher. Solomon was the wisest man in the world, people came from all over the world to hear his wisdom. He built the Temple in Jerusalem, he was the son of King David, and he was chosen to impart his wisdom to us in the book of Ecclesiastes. Solomon had thoroughly experienced all avenues of pleasure, all avenues of sensuality, all avenues of wealth, honor, folly, and the pursuit of knowledge. He also sinned in giving way to every excess of life which his position made possible and comes to the realization of the uselessness of it all. He concludes that the result of his efforts have been made him empty and that there is nothing new under the sun, but all is part of the endless, frustrating circularity. His attitude was spoken in the recurring phrase, vanity of vanities, all is vanity, saith the preacher. In Ecclesiastes, the world is convicted of its vanity by one who has drunk of every spring. The conclusion which Solomon "the preacher" reaches is that in such an empty and unsatisfying world where disappointment, trouble and death cannot be avoided, a quiet enjoyment of God's gifts is the only real wisdom. The man who is truly wise will "fear God and keep his commandments" (12:13-14), making the best of things as he finds them and trusting in the providence of God. This secret should be understood early in life. An understanding of this will provide one with great pleasure in life. The book of Ecclesiastes profoundly illustrates the idea that a life apart from God is a life without meaning.
http://www.bible-history.com/studybible/Ecclesiastes/


The Book of Ecclesiastes in Fausset's Bible Dictionary The speaker so entitles himself, Hebrew: Qoheleth, Greek Ecclesiastes, "the convener of, and preacher to, assemblies," namely, church assemblies. The feminine form, and its construction once with a feminine verb (Ecclesiastes 7:27), show that divine Wisdom herself speaks through the inspired king Solomon. God had especially endowed him with this wisdom (1 Kings 3:5-14; 1 Kings 6:11-12; 1 Kings 9:1, etc.; 1 Kings 11:9-11). "The preacher taught the people (and inquirers) knowledge" in a divan assembled for the purpose (1 Kings 4:34; 1 Kings 10:2; 1 Kings 10:8; 1 Kings 10:24; 2 Chronicles 9:1; 2 Chronicles 9:7; 2 Chronicles 9:23). "Spake," thrice in 1 Kings 4:32-33, refers not to written compositions, but to addresses spoken in assemblies. Solomon's authorship is supported by Ecclesiastes 1:12; Ecclesiastes 1:16; Ecclesiastes 2:1-15; Ecclesiastes 12:9. But in the book are found words: (1) rarely employed in the earlier, frequently in the later books of Scripture. (2) Words never found in Hebrew writings until the Babylonian captivity; as zimaan, "set time," for moed; Ecclesiastes 3:1, namely, in Nehemiah 2:6; Esther 9:27; Esther 9:31. So pithgam, "sentence" (Ecclesiastes 8:11); "thought," madang; 'illuw "though" (Ecclesiastes 6:6); bikeen, "so" (Ecclesiastes 8:10): thus, Esther approximates most to Ecclesiastes in idioms. (3) Words not found in the late Hebrew, but only in the Aramaic sections of Daniel and Ezra: yithron, "profit "; compare yuthran in the Aramaic targums; kibaar, "already," "long ago"; taaqam, "make straight" (Ecclesiastes 1:15; Ecclesiastes 7:13; Daniel 4:33) (Daniel 4:36 "established"); ruwth, "desire," found also in the Aramaic parts of Ezra. (4) The grammatical constructions agree with the transition period from Hebrew to Aramaic; frequent participles, the uses of the relative, Vav ( ? ) or waw- conversive rare. Probably, since the book...
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/E/Ecclesiastes,+the+book+of/


The Book of Ecclesiastes in the Picture Study Bible Study Bible with information about Ecclesiastes, images, and notes on many important subjects from the ancient world. Archaeological notes, geographical notes, ancient documents and manuscripts, cultural notes, theological notes, articles from scholars, information about ancient history, ancient customs, ancient temples, ancient monuments, and a close look at people, places, and events from the ancient world that are explained in an easy to understand format.
http://www.bible-history.com/studybible/Ecclesiastes/


The Ecclesiastes in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE LITERATURE 1. Structure of the Book: Reading this book one soon becomes aware that it is a discussion of certain difficult problems of human life. It begins with a title Eccl (1:1), followed by a preface (1:2- 11). It has a formal conclusion (12:8-13). Between the preface and the conclusion the body of the book is made up of materials of two kinds--first a series of "I" sections, sections uttered in the 1st person singular, a record of a personal experience; and second, an alternating series of gnomic sections, sections made up of proverbs (say 4:5,6,9- 12; 5:1-12; 7:1-14,16-22; 8:1-8; 9:7-10; 10:1-4; 10:8 through 12:7). These may be called the "thou" sections, as most of them have the pronoun of the 2nd person singular. The idea of the vanity of all things characterizes the record of experience, but it also appears in the "thou" sections (e.g. 9:9). On the other hand the proverb element is not wholly lacking in the "I" sections (e.g. 4:1-3). 2. The Contents: In the preface the speaker lays down the proposition that all things are unreal, and that the results of human effort are illusive Eccl (1:2,3). Human generations, day and night, the wind, the streams, are alike the repetition of an unending round (1:4-7). The same holds in regard to all human study and thinking (1:8-11). The speaker shows familiarity with the phenomena which we think of as those of natural law, of the persistence of force, but he thinks of them in the main as monotonously limiting human experience. Nothing is new. All effort of Nature or of man is the doing again of something which has already been done. After the preface the speaker introduces himself, and recounts his experiences. At the outset he had a noble ambition for wisdom and discipline, but all he attained to was unreality and perplexity of mind (Eccl 1:12-18). This is equally the meaning of the text, whether we translate "vanity and vexation of spirit" or "vanity and a striving after wind," ("emptiness, and struggling for breath"), though the first of these two translations is the better grounded. Finding no adequate satisfaction in the pursuits of the scholar and thinker, taken by themselves, he seeks to combine these with the pursuit of agreeable sensations-- alike those which come from luxury and those which come from activity and enterprise and achievement Eccl (2:1-12). No one could be in better shape than he for making this experiment, but again he only attains to unreality and perplexity of spirit. He says to himself that at least it is in itself profitable to be a wise man rather than a fool, but his comfort is impaired by the fact that both alike are mortal (2:13-17). He finds little reassurance in the idea of laboring for the benefit of posterity; posterity is often not worthy (2:18-21). One may toil unremittingly, but what is the use (2:22,23)?...
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/E/ECCLESIASTES,+THE+PREACHER/


Theme of The Book of Ecclesiastes Theme - All pursuits in life are empty except fearing God and obeying His Word
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofecclesiastes.html


Type of Jesus in The Book of Ecclesiastes Types and Shadows - In Ecclesiastes Jesus is true fulfillment
http://www.bible-history.com/old-testament/bookofecclesiastes.html


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