Ark of the Covenant - Bible History Online

Bible History Online

Sub Categories
Antelope
Ape
Asp or Adder
Ass
Badger
Bat
Bear
Behemoth
Bittern
Boar
Bulbul
Bull
Camel
Cattle
Chamois
Coney
Cuckoo
Deer
Dog
Dove
Dragon
Dragon Fly
Dromedary
Eagle
Elephant
Falcon
Fallow Deer
Ferret
Flamingo
Fowl
Fox
Frog
Goat
Greyhound
Hares
Hart
Hedgehog
Hen
Hoopoe
Hornet
Horse
Hyena
Kite
Leopard
Leviathon
Lion
Locust
Mole
Mouse
Mule
Owl
Palmer Worm
Pygarg
Quail
Roe
Scorpion
Sheep
Sparrow
Swine
Unicorn
Viper
Vulture
Weasel
Wolf

Back to Categories

May 23    Scripture

Bible Animals: Vulture
Vulture in the Ancient World

Vulture in Easton's Bible Dictionary (1.) Heb. da'ah (Lev. 11:14). In the parallel passage (Deut. 14:13) the Hebrew word used is _ra'ah_, rendered "glede;" LXX., "gups;" Vulg., "milvus." A species of ravenous bird, distinguished for its rapid flight. "When used without the epithet 'red,' the name is commonly confined to the black kite. The habits of the bird bear out the allusion in Isa. 34:15, for it is, excepting during the winter three months, so numerous everywhere in Israel as to be almost gregarious." (See EAGLE (2.) In Job 28:7 the Heb. 'ayyah is thus rendered. The word denotes a clamorous and a keen-sighted bird of prey. In Lev. 11:14 and Deut. 14:13 it is rendered "kite" (q.v.).
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/V/Vulture/


Vulture in Fausset's Bible Dictionary 'ayah (the red kite famed for sharp sight: Job 28:7); daah (GLEDE or black kite: Leviticus 11:14; Deuteronomy 14:13 raah); dayah, the Vulturidae; the words "after his kind" mark more than one species. Vultures differ from eagles and falcons by having the head and neck borer of feathers, the eyes not so sunk, the beak longer, curved only at the end. Cowardly; preferring carrion to other food; rarely killing their prey, unless it is feeble. The griffon of the Vulturidae is noted for seeing its prey from the greatest height. Though previously scarcely known in the Crimea, during the Anglo-Russian war they remained near the camp throughout the campaign; "wheresoever the carcass is, there will the eagles be gathered together" (Matthew 24:28; Job 39:30). Besides the griffon, the lammergever and the Egyptian vulture, "Pharaoh's hens," are found in Israel.
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/V/Vulture/


Vulture in Naves Topical Bible -A carnivorous bird Le 11:14; De 14:13 -In R. V., translated "falcon," Job 28:7 -And "kite," Isa 34:15
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/V/VULTURE/


Vulture in Smiths Bible Dictionary The rendering in the Authorized Version of the Hebrew daah, dayyah, and also in Job 28:7 of ayyah. There seems no doubt that the Authorized Versions translation is incorrect, and that the original words refer to some of the smaller species of raptorial birds, as kites or buzzards. [KITE] But the Hebrew word nesher, invariably rendered "eagle" in the Authorized Version, is probably the vulture. [EAGLE]
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/V/Vulture/


Vulture in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE vul'-tur (da'ah; Septuagint gups, and iktinos; Latin Vulturidae): Any member of a family of large birds that subsist wholly or in part on carrion. The largest vulture of Israel was the Lammer-geier. This bird waited until smaller vultures, eagles and hawks stripped a carcass to the bone, then carried the skeleton aloft and dashed it on the rocks until the marrow could be secured. This was a favorite delicacy. This bird was fond of tortoise also, and is said to have dropped the one that struck the bald head of Aeschylus, which the bird mistook for a stone, so causing the death of the poet. Several smaller species, including "Pharaoh's chickens," flocked all over Israel. These were protected by a death penalty for their value as scavengers in cities. They fed on carcasses of animals that killed each other, ate putrid fish under the nests of pelican and cormorant, followed caravans across the desert, and were ready for offal thrown from animals dressed for feasting. They flocked over the altars for the entrails from sacrifice, and devoured scraps cast aside by tent-dwellers and residents of cities. They paired with affectionate courting and nested in crevices, in walls, hollow trees and on cliffs. They raised only one pair of young to the season, as the nestlings were over two months old before they took wing. The young were white at first, then black feathers enveloped them. On account of their steady diet of carrion, no one ever has been able to use their flesh for food, although some daring ornithologists have tried. For this reason the vulture was placed among the abominations and should by right have headed the lists (Lev 11:18; Dt 14:13). The other references that used to be translated "vulture" in the King James Version, the Septuagint elaphos, Vulgate (Jerome's Latin Bible, 390-405 A.D.) correctly milous) are changed to "falcon" and "kite." Isa 34:15 changes "vulture" to "kite." Job 28:7 changes "vulture" to "falcon." Gene Stratton-Porter
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/V/VULTURE/


Vulture in Wikipedia Vulture. So does D.V. render the Hebrew, 'yyah, Lev., xi, 14; Deut., xiv, 13; Job, xxviii, 7. As has been suggested above, the text of Job at least, seems to allude to the kite rather than to the vulture. Several kinds of vultures are nevertheless referred to in the Bible; so, for instance, the bearded vulture(gyptus barbatus), called griffon in the D.V.; the griffon vulture (gyps fulvus), the Egyptian vulture (neophron percnopterus), etc. In the biblical parlance vultures are often termed eagles.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vulture


Vulture Scripture - Deuteronomy 14:13 And the glede, and the kite, and the vulture after his kind,
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Deuteronomy/14/


Vulture Scripture - Leviticus 11:14 And the vulture, and the kite after his kind;
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Leviticus/11/


If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2017 Bible History Online





More Bible History