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November 18    Scripture

Bible Animals: Bull
Bull in the ancient World.

Bulls in the Bible. Neither bison nor buffalo, but a species of large antelope. - Animal Life in the Scriptures

Antelope in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE an'-te-lop (RV; the King James Version "wild ox," te'o (Dt 14:5), and "wild bull," to (Isa 51:20); orux (The Septuagint in Codex Vaticanus has hos seutlion hemiephthon, literally, "like a half-cooked beet-root"): The dorcas gazelle (Gazella dorcas) is widely distributed in Syria, Israel and Arabia. The recently discovered Merrill's gazelle (Gazella Merrilli) inhabits the hilly country near Jerusalem and is not commonly distinguished from the dorcas gazelle. Probably the only other antelope within this range is the Arabian oryx (Oryx beatrix). Tristram cites two African species (the bubaline antelope, Bubalis mauretanica, and the addax, Addax nasomaculatus) as existing in the Sinaitic peninsula, southern Israel and Arabia, but he did not collect specimens of either and was probably misled by statements of the Arabs which in both cases really referred to the oryx. The only naturalist who has ever penetrated into Northwest Arabia is Mr. Douglas Carruthers, who went in 1909 on a collecting expedition for the Syrian Protestant College at Beirut, his object being to obtain the oryx and any other large antelopes which might be found there. Through observation and repeated inquiry he became convinced that neither the addax nor the bubaline antelope is found in Arabia. Tristram says the addax is called maha' and the bubaline antelope baqar-ul-wachsh, both of which names are in fact used by the Arabs for the oryx, which is also according to Doughty called wadichah. Tsebhi in the list of clean animals in Dt 14:5 (the King James Version "roebuck"; the Revised Version (British and American) "gazelle") is quite certainly gazelle, Arabic zabi (which see), so it is quite possible that te'o may be the oryx. It is noteworthy that it is rendered oryx (orux) in the Septuagint. It must be borne in mind that re'm or re'em, rendered "unicorn" (which see) in the King James Version and "wild ox" in the Revised Version (British and American), may perhaps also be the oryx. That the oryx should be called by two names in the Bible need not be considered strange, in view of the indefiniteness of Semitic ideas of natural history, which is directly evidenced by the three names now used for this animal by the Arabs. The slightly different form [to'] (the King James Version "wild bull"; the Revised Version (British and American) "antelope") found in Isa 51:20 ("Thy sons have fainted, they lie at the head of all the streets, as an antelope in a net") may quite as well refer to the oryx as to any other animal. According to Gesenius the word is derived from the verb ta'ah, "to outrun," which would be appropriate for this or any antelope. The accompanying illustration is from a photograph of a well-grown female oryx in the zoological gardens at Cairo, which is 35 inches high at the shoulder and whose horns are 21 inches long. An adult male measures 40 inches at the shoulders, 59 inches from tip of nose to root of tail, and the longest horns known measure 27 1/4 inches. The color is pure white with dark brown or black markings. It is a powerful animal and its horns may inflict dangerous wounds. It inhabits the deserts of Arabia and its remarkably large hoofs seem well adapted to traversing the sands. It feeds upon grasses and upon certain succulent roots, and the Bedouin declare that never drinks. Under its name of maha' it is celebrated in Arabic poetry for the beauty of its eyes. Compare the Homeric "ox-eyed goddess Hera" (Boopis potnia Ere). Baqar-ul-wachsh, the name most commonly used by the Bedouin, means "wild cow" or "wild ox," which is identical with the translation of te'o in the King James Version. Alfred Ely Day
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/A/ANTELOPE/


Bull in Fausset's Bible Dictionary Used as synonymous with ox in the KJV. Baaqaar is the Hebrew for horned cattle fit for the plow. Tor is one head of horned cattle, akin to our steer. Egel, a calf, properly of the first year; specially one offered in sacrifice. Hosea 14:2; "so shall we render the calves of our lips;" instead of sacrifices of calves, which we cannot offer to Thee in exile, we present the praises of our lips. The exile, by its enforced cessation of sacrifices during Israel's separation from the temple, the only lawful place of offering them, prepared the people for the superseding of all sacrifices by the one great antitypical sacrifice; henceforth "the sacrifice of praise continually, the fruit of our lips," is what God requires (Hebrews 13:15). The abriym express "strong bulls" (Psalm 22:12; Psalm 50:13; Psalm 68:30). Caesar describes wild bulls of the Hercynian forest, strong and swift, almost as large as elephants, and savage. The Assyrian remains depict similarly the wild urns. The ancient forest round London was infested with them. The wild bull (toh) in Isaiah 51:20, "thy sons lie at the head of all the streets as a wild bull in a net," seems to be of the antelope kind, Antilope bubalis, the "wild ox" of the Arabs; often depicted in Egyptian remains as chased not for slaughter, but for capture, it being easily domesticated.
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/B/Bull/


Bull in Naves Topical Bible -Wild, caught in nets Isa 51:20 -Blood of, in sacrifice Heb 9:13; 10:4
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/B/BULL/


Bull in Smiths Bible Dictionary terms used synonymously with ox, oxen, and properly a generic name for horned cattle when a full age and fit for the plough. It is variously rendered "bullock," Isa 65:25 "cow," Eze 4:15 "oxen," Ge 12:16 Kine is used in the Bible as the plural of cow. In Isa 51:20 the "wild bull" ("wild ox" in De 14:5 ) was possibly one of the larger species of antelope, and took its name from its swiftness. Dr. Robinson mentions larger herds of black and almost harmless buffaloes as still existing in Israel, and these may be the animal indicated.
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/B/Bull,+Bullock/


Bull in Wikipedia Bull. A symbol of fierce and relentless adversaries [Ps. xxi (Hebr., xxii), 13].
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle


Bull Scripture - Isaiah 51:20 Thy sons have fainted, they lie at the head of all the streets, as a wild bull in a net: they are full of the fury of the LORD, the rebuke of thy God.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Isaiah/51/


Bull Scripture - Job 21:10 Their bull gendereth, and faileth not; their cow calveth, and casteth not her calf.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Job/21/


Bullock in Easton's Bible Dictionary (1.) The translation of a word which is a generic name for horned cattle (Isa. 65:25). It is also rendered "cow" (Ezek. 4:15), "ox" (Gen. 12:16). (2.) The translation of a word always meaning an animal of the ox kind, without distinction of age or sex (Hos. 12:11). It is rendered "cow" (Num. 18:17) and "ox" (Lev. 17:3). (3.) Another word is rendered in the same way (Jer. 31:18). It is also translated "calf" (Lev. 9:3; Micah 6:6). It is the same word used of the "molten calf" (Ex. 32:4, 8) and "the golden calf" (1 Kings 12:28). (4.) In Judg. 6:25; Isa. 34:7, the Hebrew word is different. It is the customary word for bulls offered in sacrifice. In Hos. 14:2, the Authorized Version has "calves," the Revised Version "bullocks."
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/B/Bullock/


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