Ark of the Covenant - Bible History Online

Bible History Online

Sub Categories
Abanah River
Aceldama
Achaia
Achor
Acropolis
Adriatic Sea
Adullam
Aenon
Ai
Aijalon
Alexandria
Ammon
Amphipolis
Anathoth
Antioch of Pisidia
Antioch of Syria
Aphek
Appian Way
Appii Forum
Arabah
Arabia
Areopagus
Ariel
Arimathea
Armageddon
Ashdod
Ashkelon
Asia
Asia Minor
Athens
Babylonia
Beersheba
Berea
Beth Peor
Beth Shan
Beth Shemesh
Bethany
Bethel
Bethesda
Bethlehem
Bethphage
Bethsaida
Caesarea
Caesarea Philippi
Calvary
Cana
Canaan
Capernaum
Carmel
Cenchrea
Chebar
Cilicia
Cities of Refuge
City of David
Colosse
Corinth
Crete
Cyprus
Cyrene
Damascus
Dan
Dead Sea
Decapolis
Derbe
Dothan
Ebal
Eden
Edom
Egypt
Ekron
Elath
Elim
Emmaus
En Dor
En Gedi
Ephesus
Eshcol
Ethiopia
Fair Havens
Gadara
Galatia
Galilee
Gath
Gaza
Gebal
Gehenna
Gennesaret
Gethsemane
Gilboa
Gilead
Gilgal
Golgotha
Gomorrah
Goshen
Greece
Hades
Haran
Hebron
Hell
Hermon
Hinnom
Iconium
Idumea
Italy
Jabbok River
Jabesh Gilead
Jacob's Well
Jebus
Jericho
Jerusalem
Joppa
Jordan River
Judah
Judea
Kadesh Barnea
Kidron Valley
Kirjath Arba
Lachish
Lake of Gennesaret
Land of Moriah
Laodicea
Lebanon Mountains
Levitical Cities
Lycaonia
Lydda
Lystra
Macedonia
Machpelah
Magdala
Mahanaim
Malta
Marah
Media
Mediterranean Sea
Megiddo
Memphis
Michmash
Miletus
Millo
Mizpah
Moab
Mount Hor
Mount Horeb
Mount Moriah
Mount Nebo
Mount of Beatitudes
Mount of Olives
Mount of Olives
Mount Sinai
Mount Zion
Nain
Nazareth
Negev
Nile River
Nineveh
Nod
Noph
Ophir
Padan Aram
Pamphylia
Paphos
Paran
Patmos
Penuel
Pergamos
Persia
Petra
Pharpar River
Philadelphia
Philippi
Philistia
Phoenicia
Phrygia
Pisgah
Pisidia
Pithom
Plain of Esdraelon
Pontus
Rabbah
Rahab Hem Shebeth
Ramah
Rameses
Ramoth Gilead
Red Sea
Rehoboth
Rephidim
Rome
Rosetta
Salamis
Salt Sea
Samaria
Sardia or Sardis
Sea of Galilee
Sea of Tiberias
Seir
Seleucia
Sharon
Sheba
Shechem
Shiloh
Shinar
Shushan
Sidon
Siloam
Smyrna
Sodom
Spain
Succoth
Sychar
Syria
Tahapanes
Tarshish
Tarsus
Tekoa
Tel Abib
Thessalonica
Thyatira
Tigris River
Tophet
Transjordan
Troas
Tyre
Ur
Valley of Jehoshaphat
Valley of Salt
Wilderness of Zin
Zaraphath
Ziklag
Zoar

Back to Categories

October 18    Scripture

Bible Cities: Thessalonica
Ancient Thessalonica

Map of Ancient Thessalonica Painting of Ancient Thessalonica Modern Thessalonica

THESSALONICA was a city and prominent seaport of Macedonia, situated at the head of the Thermaic Gulf. It was the capital of the "second part " of Macedonia under the Romans, and the residence of the Roman governor. Its original name was Therma, but it was changed by Cassander to Thessalonica in honor of his wife, the sister of Alexander the Great. Its modern name is Saloniki, and it is, next to Constantinople, the most important town of European -Turkey. The Apostle Paul visited the city in A.D. 52, and founded t flourishing church there. His two Epistles to the Thessalonians are addressed to the church at this place. The city has always been very prominent in Eastern affairs. At the time of the Apostle it was quite on a level with Corinth and Athens in its control of the Levantine trade. Its position, at the junction of several important roads with the great Roman highway, the Via Egnatia, which connected Rome with the whole region to the north of the Aegean Sea, made it a valuable centre for the spread of the Gospel. There was also a large Jewish population in Thessalonica, attracted there by the commercial advantages of the city. St. Paul was aware of these advantages, as well as of the necessity of availing himself of them, and the success that crowned his efforts was of the highest importance to this cause in which he labored. - Ancient Geography

Thessalonica in Easton's Bible Dictionary a large and populous city on the Thermaic bay. It was the capital of one of the four Roman districts of Macedonia, and was ruled by a praetor. It was named after Thessalonica, the wife of Cassander, who built the city. She was so called by her father, Philip, because he first heard of her birth on the day of his gaining a victory over the Thessalians. On his second missionary journey, Paul preached in the synagogue here, the chief synagogue of the Jews in that part of Macedonia, and laid the foundations of a church (Acts 17:1-4; 1 Thes. 1:9). The violence of the Jews drove him from the city, when he fled to Berea (Acts 17:5-10). The "rulers of the city" before whom the Jews "drew Jason," with whom Paul and Silas lodged, are in the original called politarchai, an unusual word, which was found, however, inscribed on an arch in Thessalonica. This discovery confirms the accuracy of the historian. Paul visited the church here on a subsequent occasion (20:1-3). This city long retained its importance. It is the most important town of European Turkey, under the name of Saloniki, with a mixed population of about 85,000.
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/T/Thessalonica/


Thessalonica in Fausset's Bible Dictionary A town of Macedonia on the Thermaic gulf, now the gulf of Saloniki. Therma was its original name, which Cossander changed into Thessalonica in honour of his wife, Philip's daughter. It rises from the end of the basin at the head of the gulf up the declivity behind, presenting a striking appearance from the sea. After the battle of Pydna Thessalonica fell under Rome and was made capital of the second region of Macedonia. Afterward, when the four regions or governments were united in one province, Thessalonica became virtually the metropolis. Situated on the Via Ignatia which traversed the S. coast of Macedonia and Thrace, connecting thereby those regions with Rome, Thessalonica, with its harbour on the other hand connecting it commercially with Asia Minor, naturally took the leading place among the cities in that quarter. Paul was on the Via Ignatia at Neapolis and Philippi, Amphipolis and Apollonia (Acts 16:11-40; Acts 17:1), as well as at Thessalonica. The population of Saloniki is even now 60,000, of whom 10,000 are Jews. Trade in all ages attracted the latter to Thessalonica, and their synagogue here was the starting point of Paul's evangelizing. Octavius Augustus rewarded its adhesion to his cause in the second civil war by making it "a free city" with a popular assembly ("the people") and "rulers of the city" (politarchs: Acts 17:1; Acts 17:5; Acts 17:8); this political term is to be read still on an arch spanning the main street, from it we learn there were seven politarchs. Its commercial intercourse with the inland plains of Macedonia on the N., and on the S. with Greece by sea, adapted it admirably as a center from whence the gospel word "sounded out not only in Macedonia and Achaia, but in every place" (1 Thessalonians 1:8). Paul visited T. on his second missionary tour. frontPAUL and JASON on this visit.) Other Thessalonian Christians were Demas perhaps, Gaius (Acts 19:29), Secundus, and Aristarchus (Acts 20:4; Acts 27:2; Acts 19:29). On the same night that the Jewish assault on Jason's house in search of Paul and Silas his guests took place, the latter two set out for Berea. Again Paul visited Thessalonica (Acts 20:1-3), probably also after his first imprisonment at Rome (1 Timothy 1:3, in accordance with his hope, Philemon 1:25-26; Philemon 2:24). Thessalonica was the mainstay of Eastern Christianity in the Gothic invasion in the third century. To Thessalonica the Sclaves and the Bulgarians owed their conversion; from whence it was called "the orthodox city." It was taken by the Saracens in 904 A.D., by the Crusaders in 1185 A.D., and by the Turks in 1430; and the murder of the foreign consuls in 1876 had much to do with the last war of 1876-1877, between Russia and Turkey. Eustathius, the critic of the 12th century, belonged to Thessalonica. The main street still standing is the old Via Ignatia, running E. and W., as is shown by the two arches which span it, one at the E. the other at the W. end; on that at the E. end are figures in low relief representing the triumphs of a Roman emperor.
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/T/Thessalonica/


Thessalonica in Hitchcock's Bible Names victory against the Thessalians
http://www.bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Thessalonica/


Thessalonica in Naves Topical Bible (A city of the Macedonia area) -Paul visits Ac 17:1; Php 4:16 -People of, persecute Paul Ac 17:5-8,11,13 -Men of, accompany Paul Ac 20:4; 27:2 -Paul writes to Christians in 1Th 1:1; 2Th 1:1 -Demas goes to 2Ti 4:10
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/T/THESSALONICA/


Thessalonica in Smiths Bible Dictionary The original name of this city was Therma; and that part of the Macedonian shore on which it was situated retained through the Roman period the designation of the Thermaic Gulf. Cassander the son of Antipater rebuilt and enlarged Therma, and named it after his wife Thessalonica, the sister of Alexander the Great. The name ever since, under various slight modifications, has been continuous, and the city itself has never ceased to be eminent. Saloniki is still the most important town of European Turkey, next after Constantinople. Strabo in the first century speaks of Thessalonica as the most populous city in Macedonia. Visit of Paul. --St. Paul visited Thessalonica (with Silas and Timothy) during his second missionary journey, and introduced Christianity there. The first scene of the apostle's work at Thessalonica was the synagogue. Ac 17:2,3 It is stated that the ministrations among the Jews continued for three weeks. ver. 2. Not that we are obliged to limit to this time the whole stay of the apostle at Thessalonica. A flourishing church was certainly formed there; and the epistles show that its elements were more Gentile than Jewish. [For persecution and further history see PAUL] Circumstances which led Paul to Thessalonica. --Three circumstances must here be mentioned which illustrate in an important manner this visit and this journey as well as the two Epistles to the Thessalonians. 1. This was the chief station on the great Roman road called the Via Egnatia, which connected Rome with the whole region to the north of the AEgean Sea. 2. Placed as if was on this great road, and in connection with other important Roman ways. Thessalonica was an invaluable centre for the spread of the gospel. In fact it was nearly if not quite on a level with Corinth and Ephesus in its share of the commerce of the Levant. 3. The circumstance noted in Ac 17:1 that here was the synagogue of the Jews in this part of Macedonia, had evidently much to do with the apostle's plans,and also doubtless with his success. Trade would inevitably bring Jews to Thessalonica; and it is remarkable that they have ever since had a prominent place in the annals of the city. Later ecclesiastical history. --During several centuries this city was the bulwark not simply of the later Greek empire, but of Oriental Christendom, and was largely instrumental in the conversion of the Slavonians and Bulgarians. Thus it received the designation of "the orthodox city;" and its struggles are very prominent in the writings of the Byzantine historians.
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/T/Thessalonica/


Thessalonica in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE thes-a-lo-ni'-ka (Thessalonike, ethnic Thessalonikeus): 1. Position and Name: One of the chief towns of Macedonia from Hellenistic times down to the present day. It lies in 40 degrees 40 minutes North latitude, and 22 degrees 50 minutes East longitude, at the northernmost point of the Thermaic Gulf (Gulf of Salonica), a short distance to the East of the mouth of the Axius (Vardar). It is usually maintained that the earlier name of Thessalonica was Therma or Therme, a town mentioned both by Herodotus (vii.121 ff, 179 ff) and by Thucydides (i.61; ii.29), but that its chief importance dates from about 315 BC, when the Macedonian king Cassander, son of Antipater, enlarged and strengthened it by concentrating there the population of a number of neighboring towns and villages, and renamed it after his wife Thessalonica, daughter of Philip II and step-sister of Alexander the Great. This name, usually shortened since medieval times into Salonica or Saloniki, it has retained down to the present. Pliny, however, speaks of Therma as still existing side by side with Thessalonica (NH, iv.36), and it is possible that the latter was an altogether new foundation, which took from Therma a portion of its inhabitants and replaced it as the most important city on the Gulf. 2. History: Thessalonica rapidly became populous and wealthy. In the war between Perseus and the Romans it appears as the headquarters of the Macedonian navy (Livy xliv. 10) and when, after the battle of Pydna (168 BC), the Romans divided the conquered territory into four districts, it became the capital of the second of these (Livy xlv.29), while later, after the organization of the single Roman province of Macedonia in 146 BC, it was the seat of the governor and thus practically the capital of the whole province. In 58 BC Cicero spent the greater part of his exile there, at the house of the quaestor Plancius (Pro Plancio 41, 99; Epistle Ad Att, iii.8-21). In the civil war between Caesar and Pompey, Thessalonica took the senatorial side and formed one of Pompey's chief bases (49-48 BC), but in the final struggle of the republic, six years later, it proved loyal to Antony and Octavian, and was rewarded by receiving the status and privileges of a "free city" (Pliny, NH, iv.36). Strabo, writing in the reign of Augustus, speaks of it as the most populous town in Macedonia and the metropolis of the province...
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/T/THESSALONICA/


Thessalonica in Wikipedia After the fall of the kingdom of Macedon in 168 BC, Thessalonica became a city of the Roman Republic. It grew to be an important trade-hub located on the Via Egnatia, the Roman road connecting Byzantium (later Constantinople), with Dyrrhachium (now Durrės in Albania), and facilitating trade between Europe and Asia. The city became the capital of one of the four Roman districts of Macedonia; it kept its privileges but was ruled by a praetor and had a Roman garrison, while for a short time in the 1st century BC, all the Greek provinces came under Thessalonica (the Latin form of the name). Due to the city's key commercial importance, a spacious harbour was built by the Romans, the famous Burrowed Harbour (Σκαπτός Λιμήν) that accommodated the town's trade up to the eighteenth century; later, with the help of silt deposits from the river Axios, it was reclaimed as land and the port built beyond it. Remnants of the old harbour's docks can be found in the present day under Odos Frangon Street, near the Catholic Church. Thessaloniki's acropolis, located in the northern hills, was built in 55 BC after Thracian raids in the city's outskirts, for security reasons. The city had a Jewish colony, established during the first century, and was to be an early centre of Christianity. On his second missionary journey, Paul of Tarsus, born a Hellenized Israelite, preached in the city's synagogue, the chief synagogue of the Jews in that part of Thessaloniki, and laid the foundations of a church. Other Jews opposed to Paul drove him from the city, and he fled to Veroia. Paul wrote two of his epistles to the Christian community at Thessalonica, the First Epistle to the Thessalonians and the Second Epistle to the Thessalonians.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thessaloniki


Thessalonica Scripture - 2 Timothy 4:10 For Demas hath forsaken me, having loved this present world, and is departed unto Thessalonica; Crescens to Galatia, Titus unto Dalmatia.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/2+Timothy/4/


Thessalonica Scripture - Acts 17:1 Now when they had passed through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica, where was a synagogue of the Jews:
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Acts/17/


Thessalonica Scripture - Acts 17:11 These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Acts/17/


Thessalonica Scripture - Acts 17:13 But when the Jews of Thessalonica had knowledge that the word of God was preached of Paul at Berea, they came thither also, and stirred up the people.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Acts/17/


Thessalonica Scripture - Acts 27:2 And entering into a ship of Adramyttium, we launched, meaning to sail by the coasts of Asia; [one] Aristarchus, a Macedonian of Thessalonica, being with us.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Acts/27/


Thessalonica Scripture - Philippians 4:16 For even in Thessalonica ye sent once and again unto my necessity.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Philippians/4/


If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2017 Bible History Online





More Bible History