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April 28    Scripture

Bible Cities: Seleucia
Ancient Seleucia

Map of Ancient Seleucia


Seleucia in Easton's Bible Dictionary the sea-port of Antioch, near the mouth of the Orontes. Paul and his companions sailed from this port on their first missionary journey (Acts 13:4). This city was built by Seleucus Nicator, the "king of Syria." It is said of him that "few princes have ever lived with so great a passion for the building of cities. He is reputed to have built in all nine Seleucias, sixteen Antiochs, and six Laodiceas." Seleucia became a city of great importance, and was made a "free city" by Pompey. It is now a small village, called el-Kalusi.
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/S/Seleucia/


Seleucia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary Antioch's seaport. The Orontes passes Antioch, and falls into the sea near Seleucia, 16 miles from Antioch. Paul and Barnabas at their first missionary tour sailed from that port (Acts 13:4), and landed there on returning (Acts 14:26). Named from the great Alexander's successor, Seleucus Nicator, its founder, who died 280 B.C. The two piers of the old harbour still remain, bearing the names of Paul and Barnabas; the masonry is so good that it has been proposed to clear out and repair the harbour.
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/S/Seleucia/


Seleucia in Hitchcock's Bible Names shaken or beaten by the waves
http://www.bible-history.com/hitchcock/S/Seleucia/


Seleucia in Naves Topical Bible (A city of Syria beside the Mediterranean Sea) -Paul visits Ac 13:4
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/S/SELEUCIA/


Seleucia in Smiths Bible Dictionary (named after its founder, Seleucus), near the mouth of the Orontes, was practically the seaport of Antioch. The distance between the two towns was about 16 miles. St. Paul, with Barnabas, sailed from Seleucia at the beginning of his first missionary circuit. Ac 13:4 This strong fortress and convenient seaport was constructed by the first Seleucus, and here he was buried. It retained its importance in Roman times and in St. Paul's day it had the privileges of a free city. The remains are numerous.
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/S/Sele-ucia+or+Sele-ucia/


Seleucia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE se-lu'-shi-a (Seleukia): The seaport of Antioch from which it is 16 miles distant. It is situated 5 miles North of the mouth of the Orontes, in the northwestern corner of a fruitful plain at the base of Mt. Rhosus or Pieria, the modern Jebel Musa, a spur of the Amanus Range. Built by Seleucus Nicator (died 280 BC) it was one of the Syrian Tetrapolis, the others being Apameia, Laodicea and Antioch. The city was protected by nature on the mountain side, and, being strongly fortified on the South and West, was considered invulnerable and the key to Syria (Strabo 751; Polyb. v.58). It was taken, however, by Ptolemy Euergetes (1 Macc 11:8) and remained in his family till 219 BC, when it was recovered for the Seleucids by Antiochus the Great, who then richly adorned it. Captured again by Ptolemy Philometor in 146 BC, it remained for a short time in the hands of the Egyptians. Pompey made it a free city in 64 BC in return for its energy in resisting Tigranes (Pliny, NH, v.18), and it was then greatly improved by the Romans, so that in the 1st century AD it was in a most flourishing condition. On their first missionary journey Paul and Barnabas passed through it (Acts 13:4; 14:26), and though it is not named in Acts 15:30,39, this route is again implied; while it is excluded in Acts 15:3. The ruins are very extensive and cover the whole space within the line of the old walls, which shows a circuit of four miles. The position of the Old Town, the Upper City and the suburbs may still be identified, as also that of the Antioch Gate, the Market Gate and the King's Gate, which last leads to the Upper City. There are rock-cut tombs, broken statuary and sarcophagi at the base of the Upper City, a position which probably represents the burial place of the Seleucids. The outline of a circus or amphitheater can also be traced, while the inner harbor is in perfect condition and full of water. It is 2,000 ft. long by 1,200 ft. broad, and covers 47 acres, being oval or pear-shaped. The passage seaward, now silted up, was protected by two strong piers or moles, which are locally named after Barnabas and Paul. The most remarkable of the remains, however, is the great water canal behind the city, which the emperor Constantius cut through the solid rock in 338 AD. It is 3,074 ft. long, has an average breadth of 20 ft., and is in some places 120 ft. deep. Two portions of 102 and 293 ft. in length are tunneled. The object of the work was clearly to carry the mountain torrent direct to the sea, and so protect the city from the risk of flood during the wet season. Church synods occasionally met in Seleucia in the early centuries, but it gradually sank into decay, and long before the advent of Islam it had lost all its significance.
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/S/SELEUCIA/


Seleucia Scripture - Acts 13:4 So they, being sent forth by the Holy Ghost, departed unto Seleucia; and from thence they sailed to Cyprus.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Acts/13/


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