Bible History Online Resource Pages


Sub Categories


Abanah River
Aceldama
Achaia
Achor
Acropolis
Adriatic Sea
Adullam
Aenon
Ai
Aijalon
Alexandria
Ammon
Amphipolis
Anathoth
Antioch of Pisidia
Antioch of Syria
Aphek
Appian Way
Appii Forum
Arabah
Arabia
Areopagus
Ariel
Arimathea
Armageddon
Ashdod
Ashkelon
Asia
Asia Minor
Athens
Babylonia
Beersheba
Berea
Beth Peor
Beth Shan
Beth Shemesh
Bethany
Bethel
Bethesda
Bethlehem
Bethphage
Bethsaida
Caesarea
Caesarea Philippi
Calvary
Cana
Canaan
Capernaum
Carmel
Cenchrea
Chebar
Cilicia
Cities of Refuge
City of David
Colosse
Corinth
Crete
Cyprus
Cyrene
Damascus
Dan
Dead Sea
Decapolis
Derbe
Dothan
Ebal
Eden
Edom
Egypt
Ekron
Elath
Elim
Emmaus
En Dor
En Gedi
Ephesus
Eshcol
Ethiopia
Fair Havens
Gadara
Galatia
Galilee
Gath
Gaza
Gebal
Gehenna
Gennesaret
Gethsemane
Gilboa
Gilead
Gilgal
Golgotha
Gomorrah
Goshen
Greece
Hades
Haran
Hebron
Hell
Hermon
Hinnom
Iconium
Idumea
Italy
Jabbok River
Jabesh Gilead
Jacob's Well
Jebus
Jericho
Jerusalem
Joppa
Jordan River
Judah
Judea
Kadesh Barnea
Kidron Valley
Kirjath Arba
Lachish
Lake of Gennesaret
Land of Moriah
Laodicea
Lebanon Mountains
Levitical Cities
Lycaonia
Lydda
Lystra
Macedonia
Machpelah
Magdala
Mahanaim
Malta
Marah
Media
Mediterranean Sea
Megiddo
Memphis
Michmash
Miletus
Millo
Mizpah
Moab
Mount Hor
Mount Horeb
Mount Moriah
Mount Nebo
Mount of Beatitudes
Mount of Olives
Mount of Olives
Mount Sinai
Mount Zion
Nain
Nazareth
Negev
Nile River
Nineveh
Nod
Noph
Ophir
Padan Aram
Pamphylia
Paphos
Paran
Patmos
Penuel
Pergamos
Persia
Petra
Pharpar River
Philadelphia
Philippi
Philistia
Phoenicia
Phrygia
Pisgah
Pisidia
Pithom
Plain of Esdraelon
Pontus
Rabbah
Rahab Hem Shebeth
Ramah
Rameses
Ramoth Gilead
Red Sea
Rehoboth
Rephidim
Rome
Rosetta
Salamis
Salt Sea
Samaria
Sardia or Sardis
Sea of Galilee
Sea of Tiberias
Seir
Seleucia
Sharon
Sheba
Shechem
Shiloh
Shinar
Shushan
Sidon
Siloam
Smyrna
Sodom
Spain
Succoth
Sychar
Syria
Tahapanes
Tarshish
Tarsus
Tekoa
Tel Abib
Thessalonica
Thyatira
Tigris River
Tophet
Transjordan
Troas
Tyre
Ur
Valley of Jehoshaphat
Valley of Salt
Wilderness of Zin
Zaraphath
Ziklag
Zoar

Back to Categories

October 1    Scripture

Bible History Online Submission Page
Bible History OnlineBible History Online Search
Bible History Online Sitemap
About Bible History OnlineBible History Online Help




Bible Cities: Philadelphia
Ancient Philadelphia in the Bible

Map of Ancient Philadelphia


Philadelphia in Easton's Bible Dictionary brotherly love, a city of Lydia in Asia Minor, about 25 miles south-east of Sardis. It was the seat of one of the "seven churches" (Rev. 3:7-12). It came into the possession of the Turks in A.D. 1392. It has several times been nearly destroyed by earthquakes. It is still a town of considerable size, called Allahshehr, "the city of God."
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/P/Philadelphia/

Philadelphia in Fausset's Bible Dictionary In Lydia, on the lower slopes of Tmolus, 28 miles S.E. of Sardis; built by Attalus II, Philadelphus, king of Pergamus, who died. 138 B.C. Nearly destroyed by an earthquake in Tiberius' reign (Tacitus, Annals 2:47). The connection of its church with the Jews causes Christ's address to have Old Testament coloring and imagery (Revelation 3:7-18). It and Smyrna alone of the seven, the most afflicted, receive unmixed praise. To Smyrna the promise is, "the synagogue of Satan" should not prevail against her faithful ones; to Philadelphia, she should even win over some of "the synagogue of Satan," (the Jews who might have been the church of God, but by opposition had become "the synagogue of Satan") to "fall on their faces and confess God is in her of a truth" (1 Corinthians 14:25). Her name expresses "brotherly love," in conflict with legal bondage. Her converts fall low before those whom once they persecuted (Psalm 84:10; Acts 16:29-33). The promise, "him that overcometh I will make a pillar," i.e. immovably firm, stands in contrast to Philadelphia often shaken by earthquakes. Curiously, a portion of a stone church wall topped with arches of brick remains; the building must have been magnificent, and dates from Theodosius. The region being of disintegrated lava was favourable to the vine; and the coins bear the head of Bacchus. This church had but" little strength," i.e. was small in numbers and poor in resources, of small account in men's eyes. The cost of repairing the often shaken city taxed heavily the citizens. Poverty tended to humility; conscious of weakness Philadelphia leant on Christ her strength (2 Corinthians 12:9); so she "kept His word," and when tested did "not deny His name." So "He who hath the key of David, He that openeth and no man shutteth," "set before" Philadelphia an open door which no man can shut. Faithful in keeping the word of Christ's patience (i.e. the persevering endurance which He requires) Philadelphia was kept, i.e. delivered, out of the hour of temptation. "Among the Greek churches of Asia Philadelphia is still erect, a column in a scene of ruins, a pleasing example that the paths of honour and safety may be sometimes the same." (Gibbon.) The Turks call it Allah Shehr, "city of God"; or rather, "beautiful ('alah) city."
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/P/Philadelphia/

Philadelphia in Hitchcock's Bible Names love of a brother
http://www.bible-history.com/hitchcock/P/Philadelphia/

Philadelphia in Naves Topical Bible (A city of Lydia) -One of the seven congregations in Re 1:11; 3:7-13
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/P/PHILADELPHIA/

Philadelphia in Smiths Bible Dictionary strictly Philadelphi'a (brotherly love), a town on the confines of Lydia and Phrygia Catacecaumene, 25 southeast of Sardis, and built by Attalus II., king of Pergamos, who died B.C. 138. It was situated on the lower slopes of Tmolus, and is still represented by a town called Allah-shehr (city of God). Its elevation is 952 feet above the sea. The original population of Philadelphia. Seems to have been Macedonian; but there was, as appears from Le 3:9 a synagogue of Hellenizing Jews there, as well as a Christian church. (It was the seat of one of "the seven churches of Asia.") The locality was subject to constant earthquakes, which in the time of Strabo rendered even the town walls of Philadelphia unsafe. The expense of reparation was constant, and hence perhaps the poverty of the members of the church. Re 3:8 (The church was highly commended.) Re 3:7-13 Even Gibbon bears the following well-known testimony to the truth of the prophecy, "Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee in the hour of temptation": "At a distance from the sea, forgotten by the (Greek) emperor encompassed, all sides by the Turks, her valiant citizens defended their religion and freedom above fourscore years. Among the Greek colonies and churches of Asia, Philadelphia is still erect, a column in a scene of ruins." "The modern town (Allah-shehr, city of God), although spacious, containing 3000 houses and 10,000 inhabitants, is badly built; the dwellings are mean and the streets filthy. The inhabitants are mostly Turks. A few ruins are found, including remains of a wall and about twenty-five churches. In one place are four strong marble pillars, which once supported the dome of a church. One of the old mosques is believed by the native Christians to have been the church in which assembled the primitive Christians addressed in the Apocalypse." Whitney's Bible Geography.)
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/P/Philadelphia/

Philadelphia in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE fil-a-del-'fi-a (Philadelphia: A city of ancient Lydia in Asia Minor on the Cogamus River, 105 miles from Smyrna. It stood upon a terrace 650 ft. above the sea. Behind it are the volcanic cliffs to which the Turks have given the name of Devitt, or "inkwells"; on the other side of the city the land is exceedingly fertile, and there was produced a wine of whose excellence the celebrated Roman poet Virgil wrote. Philadelphia is not so ancient as many of the other cities of Asia Minor, for it was founded after 189 BC on one of the highways which led to the interior. Its name was given to it in honor of Attalus II, because of his loyalty to his elder brother, Eumenes II, king of Lydia. Still another name of the city was Decapolis, because it was considered as one of the ten cities of the plain. A third name which it bore during the 1st century. AD was Neo-kaisaria; it appears upon the coins struck during that period. During the reign of Vespasian, it was called Flavia. Its modern name, Ala- shehir, is considered by some to be a corruption of the Turkish words Allah-shehir, "the city of God," but more likely it is a name given it from the reddish color of the soil. In addition to all of these names it sometimes bore the title of "Little Athens" because of the magnificence of the temples and other public buildings which adorned it. Philadelphia quickly became an important and wealthy trade center, for as the coast cities declined, it grew in power, and retained its importance even until late Byzantine times. One of the Seven Churches of the Book of Revelation (Rev 3:7 ff) was there, and it was the seat of a bishop. As in most Asia Minor cities, many Jews lived there, and they possessed a synagogue. During the reign of Tiberius the city was destroyed by an earthquake, yet it was quickly rebuilt. Frederick Barbarossa entered it while on his crusade in 1190. Twice, in 1306 and 1324, it was besieged by the Seljuk Turks, but it retained its independence until after 1390, when it was captured by the combined forces of the Turks and Byzantines. In 1403 Tamerlane captured it, and, it is said, built about it a wall of the corpses of his victims. Ala-shehir is still a Christian town; one-fourth of its modern population is Greek, and a Greek bishop still makes his home there. One of the chief modern industries is a liquorice factory; in the fields about the city the natives dig for the roots. On the terrace upon which the ancient city stood, the ruins of the castle and the walls may still be seen, and among them is pointed out the foundation of the early church. The place may now best be reached by rail from Smyrna.
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/P/PHILADELPHIA/

Philadelphia Scripture - Revelation 1:11 Saying, I am Alpha and Omega, the first and the last: and, What thou seest, write in a book, and send [it] unto the seven churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia, and unto Laodicea.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Revelation/1/

Philadelphia Scripture - Revelation 3:7 And to the angel of the church in Philadelphia write; These things saith he that is holy, he that is true, he that hath the key of David, he that openeth, and no man shutteth; and shutteth, and no man openeth;
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Revelation/3/



If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2014 Bible History Online