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Manners & Customs: Dowry
Dowries in ancient Bible times

Ancient Dowry THE MARRIAGE DOWRY Reason for dowry for bride's family. In the Orient, when the bride's parents give their daughter in marriage, they are actually diminishing the efficiency of their family. Often unmarried daughters would tend the flock of their father (Exodus 2:16), or they would work in the field, or render help in other ways. Thus upon her marriage, a young woman would be thought of as increasing the efficiency of her husband's family and diminishing that of her parents. Therefore, a young man who expects to get possession of their daughter must be able to offer some sort of adequate compensation. This compensation was the marriage "dowry." It was not always required that the dowry be paid in cash, it could be paid in service. Because Jacob could not pay cash, he said, "I will serve thee seven years for Rachel" (Genesis 29:18). King Saul required the lives of one hundred of the enemy Philistines as dowry for David to secure Michal as his wife (I Samuel 18:25). Reason for dowry for the bride herself. It was usually customary for at least some of the price of the dowry to be given to the bride. This would be in addition to any personal gift from the bride's parents. Leah and Rachel complained about the stinginess of their father Laban. Concerning him they said, "He hath sold us, and hath quite devoured also our money" (Genesis 31:15). Laban had had the benefit of Jacob's fourteen years of service, without making the equivalent of at least part of it as a gift to Leah and Rache1. Since a divorced wife in the Orient is entitled to all her wearing apparel, for this reason much of her personal dowry consists of coins on her headgear, or jewelry on her person. This becomes wealth to her in case her marriage ends in failure. This is why the dowry is so important to the bride, and such emphasis is placed upon it in the negotiations that precede marriage. The woman who had ten pieces of silver and lost one was greatly concerned over the loss, because it was doubtless a part of her marriage dowry (Luke 15:8,9). Special dowry from the bride's father. It was customary for fathers who could afford to do so to give their daughters a special marriage dowry. When Rebekah left her father's house to be the bride of Isaac, her father gave her a nurse and also damsels who were to be her attendants (Genesis 24:59, 61). And Caleb gave to his daughter a dowry of a field with springs of water (Judges 1:15). Such was sometimes the custom in olden times. [Manners And Customs of Bible Lands]
http://www.baptistbiblebelievers.com/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=iAcb1rTVOP8%3d&tabid=232&mid=762

Dowry in Easton's Bible Dictionary (mohar; i.e., price paid for a wife, Gen. 34:12; Ex. 22:17; 1 Sam. 18:25), a nuptial present; some gift, as a sum of money, which the bridegroom offers to the father of his bride as a satisfaction before he can receive her. Jacob had no dowry to give for his wife, but he gave his services (Gen. 29:18; 30:20; 34:12).
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/D/Dowry/

Dowry in Fausset's Bible Dictionary The suitor's payment to the father for the wife
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/D/Dowry/

Dowry in Naves Topical Bible General scriptures concerning Ex 22:16,17; Ru 4:3-9 -See WOMEN
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/D/DOWRY/

Dowry in Smiths Bible Dictionary [MARRIAGE]
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/D/Dowry/

Dowry in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE dou'-ri: In all Hebrew marriages, the dowry held an important place. The dowry sealed the betrothal. It took several forms. The bridegroom presented gifts to the bride. There was the mohar, "dowry" as distinguished from matttan, "gifts to the members of the family" (compare Gen 24:22,53; Gen 34:12). The price paid to the father or brothers of the bride was probably a survival of the early custom of purchasing wives (Gen 34:12; Ex 22:17; 1 Sam 18:25; compare Ruth 4:10; Hos 3:2). There was frequently much negotiation and bargaining as to size of dowry (Gen 34:12). The dowry would generally be according to the wealth and standing of the bride (compare 1 Sam 18:23). It might consist of money, jewelry or other valuable effects; sometimes, of service rendered, as in the case of Jacob (Gen 29:18); deeds of valor might be accepted in place of dowry (Josh 15:16; 1 Sam 18:25; Jdg 1:12). Occasionally a bride received a dowry from her father; sometimes in the shape of land (Jdg 1:15), and of cities (1 Ki 9:16). In later Jewish history a written marriage contract definitely arranged for the nature and size of the dowry.
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/D/DOWRY/

Dowry Scripture - 1 Samuel 18:25 And Saul said, Thus shall ye say to David, The king desireth not any dowry, but an hundred foreskins of the Philistines, to be avenged of the king's enemies. But Saul thought to make David fall by the hand of the Philistines.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/1+Samuel/18/

Dowry Scripture - Exodus 22:17 If her father utterly refuse to give her unto him, he shall pay money according to the dowry of virgins.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Exodus/22/

Dowry Scripture - Genesis 30:20 And Leah said, God hath endued me [with] a good dowry; now will my husband dwell with me, because I have born him six sons: and she called his name Zebulun.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Genesis/30/

Dowry Scripture - Genesis 34:12 Ask me never so much dowry and gift, and I will give according as ye shall say unto me: but give me the damsel to wife.
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Genesis/34/

Negotiating the Dowry CONDUCTING NEGOTIATIONS TO SECURE A WIFE The customs of the Arabs in certain sections of Bible lands when they negotiate to secure a bride for their son, illustrate in many respects Biblical practices. If a young man has acquired sufficient means to make it possible for him to provide a marriage dowry, then his parents select the girl and the negotiations begin. The father calls in a man who acts as a deputy for him and the son. This deputy is called, "the friend of the bridegroom" by John the Baptist (John 3:29). This man is fully informed as to the dowry the young man is willing to pay for his bride. Then, together with the young man's father, or some other male relative, or both, he goes to the home of the young woman. The father announces that the deputy will speak for the party, and then the bride's father will appoint a deputy to represent him. Before the negotiations begin, a drink of coffee is offered the visiting group, but they refuse to drink until the mission is completed. Thus Abraham's servant, when offered food by the parents of Rebekah, said, "I will not eat, until I have told mine errand" (Genesis 24:33). When the two deputies face each other, then the negotiations begin in earnest. There must be consent for the hand of the young woman and agreement on the amount of dowry to be paid for her. When these are agreed upon, the deputies rise and their congratulations are exchanged, and then coffee is brought in, and they all drink of it as a seal of the covenant thus entered into. [Manners And Customs of Bible Lands]
http://www.baptistbiblebelievers.com/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=iAcb1rTVOP8%3d&tabid=232&mid=762



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