Ark of the Covenant - Bible History Online

Bible History Online

Sub Categories
1. Previous List
Achelous
Acheron
Achilles
Actaeon
Admetus
Adonis
Aeacus
Aeëtes
Aegeus
Aegisthus
Aegyptus
Aeneas
Aeolus
Aesculapius
Aeson
Aether
Aethra
Agamemnon
Aglaia
Ajax
Alcestis
Alcmene
Alcyone
Alecto
Alectryon
Althaea
Amazons
Amor
Amphion
Amphitrite
Amphitryon
Anchises
Ancile
Andraemon
Andromache
Andromeda
Anteia
Anteros
Antigone
Antinoüs
Aphrodite (Venus)
Apollo
Aquilo
Arachne
Ares (Mars)
Argo
Argus
Ariadne
Arion
Artemis (Diana)
Asclepius (Aesculapius)
Astarte
Asterope
Astraea
Atalanta
Athena (Minerva)
Atlas
Atreus
Atropos
Aurora
Auster
Avernus
Bacchus
Bellerophon
Bellona
Boreas
Briareus
Briseis
Cadmus
Calliope
Calypso
Cassandra
Castor
Celaeno
Centaurs
Cephalus
Cepheus
Cerberus
Ceres
Chaos
Charon
Charybdis
Chimera
Chiron
Chronos
Chryseis
Circe
Clio
Clotho
Clytemnestra
Cocytus
Creon
Creusa
Creüsa
Cronus (Saturn)
Cupid
Cybele
Cyclopes
Daedalus
Danae
Danaïdes
Danaüs
Daphne
Decuma
Deino
Demeter (Ceres)
Diana
Dido
Diomedes
Diomedes
Dione
Dionysus (Bacchus)
Dioscuri
Dis
Dryads
Dryope
Echo
Electra
Electra
Elysium
Endymion
Enyo
Eos (Aurora)
Epimetheus
Erato
Erebus
Erinyes
Eris
Eros (Amor or Cupid)
Eteocles
Eumenides
Euphrosyne
Europa
Eurus
Euryale
Eurydice
Eurystheus
Euterpe
Fates
Fauns
Faunus
Favonius
Flora
Fortuna
Furies
Gaea
Galatea
Galatea
Ganymede
Glaucus
Golden Fleece
Gorgons
Graces
Graeae
Greek Mythology
Hades (Dis)
Haemon
Hamadryads
Harpies
Hebe (Juventas)
Hecate
Hector
Hecuba
Helen
Heliades
Helios (Sol)
Helle
Hephaestus (Vulcan)
Hera (Juno)
Hercules
Hermes (Mercury)
Hero
Hesperus
Hestia (Vesta)
Hippolyte
Hippolytus
Hippomenes
Hyacinthus
Hydra
Hygeia
Hymen
Hyperion
Hypermnestra
Hypnos (Somnus)
Iapetus
Icarus
Io
Iobates
Iphigenia
Iris
Ismene
Iulus
Ixion
Janus
Jason
Jocasta
Juno
Jupiter
Juventas
Lachesis
Laius
Laocoön
Lares
Latona
Lavinia
Leander
Leda
Lethe
Leto (Latona)
Lucina
Lynceus
Maia
Maia
Manes
Mars
Marsyas
Medea
Medusa
Megaera
Meleager
Melpomene
Memnon
Menelaus
Mentor
Mercury
Merope
Mezentius
Midas
Minerva
Minos
Minotaur
Mnemosyne
Moirae
Momus
Morpheus
Mors
Morta
Muses
Naiads
Napaeae
Narcissus
Nemesis
Neoptolemus
Neptune
Nereids
Nestor
Nike
Niobe
Nona
Notus
Nox
Nymphs
Nyx (Nox)
Oceanids
Oceanus
Odysseus (Ulysses)
Oedipus
Oenone
Ops
Oreads
Orestes
Orion
Orpheus
Pales
Palinurus
Pan (Faunus)
Pandora
Parcae
Paris
Patroclus
Pegasus
Pelias
Pelops
Penates
Penelope
Pephredo
Periphetes
Persephone (Proserpine)
Perseus
Phaedra
Phaethon
Philoctetes
Phineus
Phlegethon
Phosphor
Phrixos
Pirithous
Pleiades
Pluto (Dis)
Plutus
Pollux
Polyhymnia
Polymnia (Polyhymnia)
Polynices
Polyphemus
Polyxena
Pomona
Pontus
Poseidon (Neptune)
Priam
Priapus
Procris
Procrustes
Proetus
Prometheus
Proserpine
Proteus
Psyche
Pygmalion
Pyramus
Python
Quirinus
Remus
Rhadamanthus
Rhea (Ops)
Rivers of Underworld
Romulus
Sarpedon
Saturn
Satyrs
Sciron
Scylla
Selene
Semele
Sibyls
Sileni
Silvanus
Sinis
Sirens
Sisyphus
Sol
Somnus
Sphinx
Sterope (Asterope)
Stheno
Styx
Symplegades
Syrinx
Tantalus
Tartarus
Taygete
Telemachus
Tellus
Terminus
Terpsichore
Terra
Thalia
Thanatos (Mors)
Themis
Theseus
Thisbe
Thyestes
Tiresias
Tisiphone
Titans
Tithonus
Triton
Turnus
Ulysses
Urania
Uranus
Venus
Vertumnus
Vesta
Vulcan
Winds
Zephyrus
Zeus (Jupiter)

Back to Categories

December 11    Scripture

Mythology & Beliefs: Vertumnus
In Greek and Roman Mythology, Vertumnus was the Roman god of fruits and vegetables; husband of Pomona.

Vertumnus in Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology Vertumnus or VORTUMNUS, is said to have been an Etruscan divinity whose worship was introduced at Rome by an ancient Vulsinian colony occupying at first the Caelian hill, and afterwards the vicus Tuscus. (Propert 4.2. 6, &c.; Ov. Miet. 14.642.) The name is evidently connected with verto, and formed on the analogy of alumnus from alo, whence it must signify " the god who changes or metamorphoses himself." For this reason the Romans connected Vertumnus with all occurrences to which the verb verto applies, such as the change of seasons, purchase and sale, the return of rivers to their proper beds, &c. (Comp. Horat. Sat. 2.7. 14.) But in reality the god was connected only with the transformation of plants, and their progress from being in blossom to that of bearing fruit. (Schol. ad Horat. List. 1.20. 1 Ascon. in Cic. Verr. 1.59; Propert. 4.2. 10, &c.) Hence the story, that when Vertumnus was in love with Pomona, he assumed all possible forms, until at last he gained his end by metamorphosing himself into a blooming youth. (Propert 4.2. 21, &c.; Ov. l.c.) Gardeners accordingly offered to him the first produce of their gardens and garlands of budding flowers. (Propert. 4.2. 18 and 45.) But the whole people celebrated a festival to Vertumnus on the 23d of August, under the name of the Vortumnalia, denoting the transition from the beautiful season of autumn to the less agreeable one. He had a temple in the vicus Tuscus, and a statue of him stood in the vicus Jugarius near the altar of Ops. (Propert. l.c. ; Cic. in Verr. 1.59.) The story of the Etruscan origin seems to be sufficiently refuted by his genuine Roman name, and it is much more probable that the worship of Vertumnus was of Sabine origin, which in fact is implied in his connection with T. Tatius. (Varro, De L. L. 5.75.) The importance of the worship of Vertumnus at Rome is evident from the fact, that it was attended to by a special flamen (flamen Vortumnalis ; see Varro, De L. L. 7.45, with Müller's note; Festus, p. 379; Plin. Nat. 23.1; Müller, Anc. Art and its Rem. § 404). - A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, William Smith, Ed.
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3atext%3a1999.04.0104


Vertumnus in Wikipedia In Roman mythology, Vertumnus — also Vortumnus or Vertimnus — is the god of seasons, change[1] and plant growth, as well as gardens and fruit trees. He could change his form at will; using this power, according to Ovid's Metamorphoses (xiv), he tricked Pomona into talking to him by disguising himself as an old woman and gaining entry to her orchard, then using a narrative warning of the dangers of rejecting a suitor (the embedded tale of Iphis and Anaxarete) to seduce her. The tale of Vertumnus and Pomona was the only purely Latin tale in Ovid's Metamorphoses.[2]...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vertumnus


If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2017 Bible History Online





More Bible History