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April 29    Scripture

Mythology & Beliefs: Lynceus
In Greek and Roman Mythology, Lynceus was the son of Aegyptus; husband of Hypermnestra; slew DanaŘs.

Lynceus in Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology (Λυγκεύς). 1. A son of Aegyptus and Argyphia, and husband of the Danaid Hypermnestra, by whom he became the father of Abas. He was king of Argos, whence that city is called Λυλκήϊον Ἄργος (Apollon. 1.125). His story is, that when the Danaides, by the desire of their father, killed their husbands in one night, Hypermnestra alone spared the life of her husband Lynceus. Danaus thereupon kept his disobedient daughter in strict confinement, but was afterwards prevailed upon to give her to Lynceus, who succeeded him on the throne of Argos (Apollod. 2.1.5, 2.1; Paus. 2.16.1; Ov. Ep. 14). The cause of Hypermnestra sparing Lynceus is not the same in all accounts (Schol. ad Pind. Nem. 10.10, ad Eurip. Hecub. 869, ad Pind. Pyth. 9.200). It is also said that she assisted her husband in his eseape from the vengeance of Danaus, that he fled to Lyrceia (Lynceia), and from thence gave a sign with a torch that he had safely arrived there; Hypermnestra returned the sign from the citadel of Argos, and in commemoration of this event the Argives celebrated every year a festival with torches (Paus. 2.25.4; comp. 2.19.6, 21.1, 20.5). When Lynceus received the news of the death of Danaus from his son Abas, Lynceus gave to Abas the shield of Danaus, which had been dedicated in the temple of Hera, and instituted games in honour of Hera, in which the victor received a shield as his prize (Hyg. Fab. 273). According to some, Lynceus slew Danaus and all the sisters of Hypermnestra, in revenge for his brothers (Schol. ad Eurip. Hecub. 869; Serv. ad Aen. 10.497). Lynceus and his wife were revered at Argos as heroes, and had a common sanctuary, and their tomb was shown there not far from the altar of Zeus Phyxius (Hyg. Fab. 168; Paus. 2.21.2). Their statues stood in the temple at Delphi, as a present from the Argives. (Paus. 10.10.2.) 2. A son of Aphareus and Arene, and brother of Idas, was one of the Argonauts and famous for his keen sight, whence the proverb ὀξύτερον Βλέπειν τοῦ Λυγκέως (Apollod. 1.8.2, 4.17, 3.10.3). He is also mentioned among the Calydonian hunters, and was slain by Pollux (1.8.2, 3.11.2; comp. Pind. N. 10.21, 115, &c.; Apollon. 1.151, &c., 4.1466, &c.; Aristoph. Pl. 210). There are two other mythical personages of this name. (Hyg. Fab. 173; Apollod. 2.7.8.) - A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, William Smith, Ed.
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3atext%3a1999.04.0104


Lynceus in Wikipedia In Greek mythology, Lynceus (Ancient Greek: Λυγκεύς) was a king of Argos, succeeding Danaus. He is named as a descendant of Belus through his father Aegyptus, who was the twin brother of Danaus. Danaus had fifty daughters, the Danaides, while Aegyptus had fifty sons including Lynceus, whose name when translated means 'wolf'. Aegyptus commanded that his sons marry the Danaides and Danaus fled to Argos, ruled by King Pelasgus with his daughters. When Aegyptus and his sons arrived to take the Danaides, Danaus gave them to spare the Argives the pain of a battle. However, he instructed his daughters to kill their husbands on their wedding night. Forty-nine followed through, but one, Hypermnestra refused because her husband, Lynceus, honored her wish to remain a virgin. Danaus was angry with his disobedient daughter and threw her to the Argive courts. Aphrodite intervened and saved her. Lynceus later killed Danaus as revenge for the death of his brothers. Lynceus and Hypermnestra then began a dynasty of Argive kings (the Danaan Dynasty) beginning with Abas. In some versions of the legend, the Danaides, minus Hypermnestra (or sometimes alternately Amymone) were punished in Tartarus by being forced to carry water through a jug with holes, or a sieve, so the water always leaked out.[1][2][3][4]...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynceus


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