Ark of the Covenant - Bible History Online

Bible History Online

Sub Categories
1. Previous List
Achelous
Acheron
Achilles
Actaeon
Admetus
Adonis
Aeacus
AeŰtes
Aegeus
Aegisthus
Aegyptus
Aeneas
Aeolus
Aesculapius
Aeson
Aether
Aethra
Agamemnon
Aglaia
Ajax
Alcestis
Alcmene
Alcyone
Alecto
Alectryon
Althaea
Amazons
Amor
Amphion
Amphitrite
Amphitryon
Anchises
Ancile
Andraemon
Andromache
Andromeda
Anteia
Anteros
Antigone
AntinoŘs
Aphrodite (Venus)
Apollo
Aquilo
Arachne
Ares (Mars)
Argo
Argus
Ariadne
Arion
Artemis (Diana)
Asclepius (Aesculapius)
Astarte
Asterope
Astraea
Atalanta
Athena (Minerva)
Atlas
Atreus
Atropos
Aurora
Auster
Avernus
Bacchus
Bellerophon
Bellona
Boreas
Briareus
Briseis
Cadmus
Calliope
Calypso
Cassandra
Castor
Celaeno
Centaurs
Cephalus
Cepheus
Cerberus
Ceres
Chaos
Charon
Charybdis
Chimera
Chiron
Chronos
Chryseis
Circe
Clio
Clotho
Clytemnestra
Cocytus
Creon
Creusa
CreŘsa
Cronus (Saturn)
Cupid
Cybele
Cyclopes
Daedalus
Danae
Dana´des
DanaŘs
Daphne
Decuma
Deino
Demeter (Ceres)
Diana
Dido
Diomedes
Diomedes
Dione
Dionysus (Bacchus)
Dioscuri
Dis
Dryads
Dryope
Echo
Electra
Electra
Elysium
Endymion
Enyo
Eos (Aurora)
Epimetheus
Erato
Erebus
Erinyes
Eris
Eros (Amor or Cupid)
Eteocles
Eumenides
Euphrosyne
Europa
Eurus
Euryale
Eurydice
Eurystheus
Euterpe
Fates
Fauns
Faunus
Favonius
Flora
Fortuna
Furies
Gaea
Galatea
Galatea
Ganymede
Glaucus
Golden Fleece
Gorgons
Graces
Graeae
Greek Mythology
Hades (Dis)
Haemon
Hamadryads
Harpies
Hebe (Juventas)
Hecate
Hector
Hecuba
Helen
Heliades
Helios (Sol)
Helle
Hephaestus (Vulcan)
Hera (Juno)
Hercules
Hermes (Mercury)
Hero
Hesperus
Hestia (Vesta)
Hippolyte
Hippolytus
Hippomenes
Hyacinthus
Hydra
Hygeia
Hymen
Hyperion
Hypermnestra
Hypnos (Somnus)
Iapetus
Icarus
Io
Iobates
Iphigenia
Iris
Ismene
Iulus
Ixion
Janus
Jason
Jocasta
Juno
Jupiter
Juventas
Lachesis
Laius
Laoco÷n
Lares
Latona
Lavinia
Leander
Leda
Lethe
Leto (Latona)
Lucina
Lynceus
Maia
Maia
Manes
Mars
Marsyas
Medea
Medusa
Megaera
Meleager
Melpomene
Memnon
Menelaus
Mentor
Mercury
Merope
Mezentius
Midas
Minerva
Minos
Minotaur
Mnemosyne
Moirae
Momus
Morpheus
Mors
Morta
Muses
Naiads
Napaeae
Narcissus
Nemesis
Neoptolemus
Neptune
Nereids
Nestor
Nike
Niobe
Nona
Notus
Nox
Nymphs
Nyx (Nox)
Oceanids
Oceanus
Odysseus (Ulysses)
Oedipus
Oenone
Ops
Oreads
Orestes
Orion
Orpheus
Pales
Palinurus
Pan (Faunus)
Pandora
Parcae
Paris
Patroclus
Pegasus
Pelias
Pelops
Penates
Penelope
Pephredo
Periphetes
Persephone (Proserpine)
Perseus
Phaedra
Phaethon
Philoctetes
Phineus
Phlegethon
Phosphor
Phrixos
Pirithous
Pleiades
Pluto (Dis)
Plutus
Pollux
Polyhymnia
Polymnia (Polyhymnia)
Polynices
Polyphemus
Polyxena
Pomona
Pontus
Poseidon (Neptune)
Priam
Priapus
Procris
Procrustes
Proetus
Prometheus
Proserpine
Proteus
Psyche
Pygmalion
Pyramus
Python
Quirinus
Remus
Rhadamanthus
Rhea (Ops)
Rivers of Underworld
Romulus
Sarpedon
Saturn
Satyrs
Sciron
Scylla
Selene
Semele
Sibyls
Sileni
Silvanus
Sinis
Sirens
Sisyphus
Sol
Somnus
Sphinx
Sterope (Asterope)
Stheno
Styx
Symplegades
Syrinx
Tantalus
Tartarus
Taygete
Telemachus
Tellus
Terminus
Terpsichore
Terra
Thalia
Thanatos (Mors)
Themis
Theseus
Thisbe
Thyestes
Tiresias
Tisiphone
Titans
Tithonus
Triton
Turnus
Ulysses
Urania
Uranus
Venus
Vertumnus
Vesta
Vulcan
Winds
Zephyrus
Zeus (Jupiter)

Back to Categories

October 22    Scripture

Mythology & Beliefs: Hera (Juno)
In Greek and Roman Mythology, Hera (Juno) was the queen of heaven; wife of Zeus. In Greek and Roman mythology Hera (Juno) was a celestial deity who was the daughter of Saturn and Ops. She married Jupiter and became queen of all the gods, and was mistress of heaven and earth. In statues Hera (Juno) is seen wearing a long robe and magnificent dress, with attributes of fortune. She is also seen sitting on a throne with a crown and sceptre, or standing between a peacock and a crow, attended by air nymphs, and by Iris, the goddess of the rainbow. In ancient Rome Hera (Juno) was the Goddess of the earth. (Also see Juno) - Greek Mythology

Hera in Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology (*(/Hra or Ἥρη), probably identical with kera, mistress, just as her husband, Zeus, was called ἔρρος in the Aeolian dialect (Hesych. s. v.). The derivation of the name has been attempted in a variety of ways, from Greek as well as oriental roots, though there is no reason for having recourse to the latter, as Hera is a purely Greek divinity, and one of the few who, according to Herodotus (2.50), were not introduced into Greece from Egypt. Hera was, according to some accounts, the eldest daughter of Cronos and Rhea, and a sister of Zeus. (Hom. Il. 16.432; comp. 4.58; Ov. Fast. 6.29.) Apollodorus (1.1.5), however, calls Hestia the eldest daughter of Cronos; and Lactantius (1.14) calls her a twin-sister of Zeus. According to the Homeric poems (Il. 14.201, &c.), she was brought up by Oceanus and Thetys, as Zeus had usurped the throne of Cronos; and afterwards she became the wife of Zeus, without the knowledge of her parents. This simple account is variously modified in other traditions. Being a daughter of Cronos, she, like his other children, was swallowed by her father, but afterwards released (Apollod. l.c.), and, according to an Arcadian tradition, she was brought up by Temenus, the son of Pelasgus. (Paus. 8.22.2; August. de Civ. Dei, 6.10.) The Argives, on the other hand, related that she had been brought up by Euboea, Prosymna, and Acraea, the three daughters of the river Asterion (Paus. 2.7.1, &c.; Plut. Sympos. 3.9); and according to Olen, the Horae were her nurses. (Paus. 2.13.3.) Several parts of Greece also claimed the honour of being her birthplace; among them are two, Argos and Samos, which were the principal seats of her worship. (Strab. p. 413; Paus. 7.4.7; Apollon. 1.187.) Her marriage with Zeus also offered ample scope for poetical invention (Theocrit. 17.131, &c.), and several places in Greece claimed the honour of having been the scene of the marriage, such as Euboea (Steph. Byz. s. v. Κάρυστος), Samos (Lactant. de Fals. Relig. 1.17), Cnossus in Crete (Diod. 5.72), and Mount Thornax, in the south of Argolis. (Schol. ad Theocrit. 15.64; Paus. 2.17.4, 36.2.) This marriage acts a prominent part in the worship of Hera under the name of ἱερὸς γάμος; on that occasion all the gods honoured the bride with presents, and Ge presented to her a tree with golden apples, which was watched by the Hesperides in the garden of Hera, at the foot of the Hyperborean Atlas. (Apollod. 2.5.11; Serv. ad Aen. 4.484.) The Homeric poems know nothing of all this, and we only hear, that after the marriage with Zeus, she was treated by the Olympian gods with the same reverence as her husband. (Il. 15.85, &c.; comp. 1.532, &c., 4.60, &c.) Zeus himself, according to Homer, listened to her counsels, and communicated his secrets to her rather than to other gods (16.458, 1.547). Hera also thinks herself justified in censuring Zeus when he consults others without her knowing it (1.540, &c.); but she is, notwithstanding, far inferior to him in power; she must obey him unconditionally, and, like the other gods, she is chastised by him when she has offended him (4.56, 8.427, 463). Hera therefore is not, like Zeus, the queen of gods and men, but simply the wife of the supreme god. The idea of her being the queen of heaven, with regal wealth and power, is of a much later date. (Hyg. Fab. 92; Ov. Fast. 6.27, Heroid. 16.81; Eustath. ad Hom. p. 81.) There is only one point in which the Homeric poems represent Hera as possessed of similar power with Zeus, viz. she is able to confer the power of prophecy (19.407). But this idea is not further developed in later times. (Comp. Strab. p. 380; Apollon. 3.931.) Her character, as described by Homer, is not of a very amiable kind, and its main features are jealousy, obstinacy, and a quarrelling disposition, which sometimes makes her own husband tremble (1.522, 536, 561, 5.892.) Hence there arise frequent disputes between Hera and Zeus; and on one occasion Hera, in conjunction with Poseidon and Athena, contemplated putting Zeus into chains (8.408, 1.399). Zeus, in such cases, not only threatens, but beats her; and once he even hung her up in the clouds, her hands chained, and with two anvils suspended from her feet (8.400, &c., 477, 15.17, &c.; Eustath. ad Hom. p. 1003). Hence she is frightened by his threats, and gives way when he is angry; and when she is unable to gain her ends in any other way, she has recourse to cunning and intrigues (19.97). Thus she borrowed from Aphrodite the girdle, the giver of charm and fascination, to excite the love of Zeus (14.215, &c.). By Zeus she was the mother of Ares, Hebe, and Hephaestus (5.896, Od. 11.604, Il. 1.585; Hes. Th. 921, &c.; Apollod. 1.3.1.) Respecting the different traditions about the descent of these three divinities see the separate articles. Properly speaking, Hera was the only really married goddess among the Olympians, for the marriage of Aphrodite with Ares can scarcely be taken into consideration; and hence she is the goddess of marriage and of the birth of children. Several epithets and surnames, such as Εἰγείθυια, Γαμηλία, Ζυλία, Τελεία, &c., contain allusions to this character of the goddess, and the Eileithyiae are described as her daughters. (Hom. Il. 11.271, 19.118.) Her attire is described in the Iliad (14.170, &c.); she rode in a chariot drawn by two horses, in the harnessing and unharnessing of which she was assisted by Hebe and the Horase (4.27, 5.720, &c., 8.382, 433). Her favourite places on earth were Argos, Sparta, and Mycenae (4.51). Owing to the judgment of Paris, she was hostile towards the Trojans, and in the Trojan war she accordingly sided with the Greeks (2.15, 4.21, &c., 24.519, &c.). Hence she prevailed on Helius to sink down into the waves of Oceanus on the day on which Patroclus fell (18.239). In the Iliad she appears as an enemy of Heracles, but is wounded by his arrows (5.392, 18.118), and in the Odyssey she is described as the supporter of Jason. It is impossible here to enumerate all the events of mythical story in which Hera acts a more or less prominent part; and the reader must refer to the particular deities or heroes with whose story she is connected. Hera had sanctuaries, and was worshipped in many parts of Greece, often in common with Zeus. Her worship there may be traced to the very earliest times: thus we find Hera, surnamed Pelasgis, worshipped at Iolcos. But the principal place of her worship was Argos, hence called the δώ̀μα Ἡρας. (Pind. Nem. x. imt.; comp. Aeschyl. Suppl. 297.) According to tradition, Hera had disputed the possession of Argos with Poseidon, but the river-gods of the country adjudicated it to her. (Paus. 2.15.5.) Her most celebrated sanctuary was situated between Argos and Mycenae, at the foot of Mount Euboea. The vestibule of the temple contained ancient statues of the Charites, the bed of Hera, and a shield which Menelaus had taken at Troy from Euphorbus. The sitting colossal statue of Hera in this temple, made of gold and ivory, was the work of Polycletus. She wore a crown on her head, adorned with the Charites and Horae; in the one hand she held a pomegranate, and in the other a sceptre headed with a cuckoo. (Paus. 2.17, 22; Strab. p. 373; Stat. Theb. 1.383.) Respecting the great quinqnennial festival celebrated to her at Argos, see Dict. of Ant. s. v. Ἤραια. Her worship was very ancient also at Corinth (Paus. 2.24, 1, &c.; Apollod. 1.9.28), Sparta (3.13.6, 15.7), in Samos (Hdt. 3.60; Paus. 7.4.4; Strab. p. 637), at Sicyon (Paus. 2.11.2), Olympia (5.15.7, &c.), Epidaurus (Thuc. 5.75; Paus. 2.29.1), Heraea in Arcadia (Paus. 8.26.2), and many other places. Respecting the real significance of Hera, the ancients themselves offer several interpretations: some regarded her as the personification of the atmosphere (Serv. ad Aen. 1.51), others as the queen of heaven or the goddess of the stars (Eur. Hel. 1097), or as the goddess of the moon (Plut. Quaest. Rom. 74), and she is even confounded with Ceres, Diana, and Proserpina. (Serv. ad Virg. Georg. 1.5). According to modern views, Hera is the great goddess of nature, who was every where worshipped from the earliest times. The Romans identified their goddess Juno with the Greek Hera [JUNO]. We still possess several representations of Hera. The noblest image, and which was afterwards looked upon as the ideal of the goddess, was the statue by Polycletus. She was usually represented as a majestic woman at a mature age, with a beautiful forehead, large and widely opened eyes, and with a grave expression commanding reverence. Her hair was adorned with a crown or a diadem. A veil frequently hangs down the back of her head, to characterise her as the bride of Zeus, and, in fact, the diadem, veil, sceptre, and peacock are her ordinary attributes. A number of statues and heads of Hera still exist. (Hirt, Mythol. Bilderb. i. p. 22; comp. Muller, Dorians, 2.10.1.) - A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, William Smith, Ed.
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3atext%3a1999.04.0104


Hera in Wikipedia Hera (pronounced /ˈhɛrə/; Greek Ήρα, Hēra, equivalently Ήρη, Hērē, in Ionic and Homer) was the wife and one of three sisters of Zeus in the Olympian pantheon of classical Greek Mythology. Her chief function was as the goddess of women and marriage. In Roman mythology, Juno was the equivalent mythical character. The cow, and later, the peacock were sacred to her. Hera's mother was Rhea and her father, Cronus. Portrayed as majestic and solemn, often enthroned, and crowned with the polos (a high cylindrical crown worn by several of the Great Goddesses), Hera may bear a pomegranate in her hand, emblem of fertile blood and death and a substitute for the narcotic capsule of the opium poppy.[1] A scholar of Greek mythology Walter Burkert writes in Greek Religion, "Nevertheless, there are memories of an earlier aniconic representation, as a pillar in Argos and as a plank in Samos."[2]...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hera


If you notice a broken link or any error PLEASE report it by clicking HERE
© 1995-2017 Bible History Online





More Bible History