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Ancient Greece: Shipwrecks
Ancient Ship discoveries, maritime and nautical archaeology

2500 Year Old Shipwreck Raised Off Sicillian Coast An ancient Greek ship recently raised off the coast of southern Sicily, Italy, is the biggest and best maintained vessel of its kind ever found, archaeologists say. At a length of nearly 70 feet (21 meters) and a width of 21 feet (6.5 meters), the 2,500-year-old craft is the largest recovered ship built in a manner first depicted in Homer's Iliad, which is believed to date back several centuries earlier.
http://www.divemaster.com/diving-news/2500-year-old-shipwreck-raised-sicillian-coast_32023.html

Ancient Greek Shipwreck Found; Cargo was Fine Wine Many others were from the island Skopelos, or ancient Peparethos, probably the last port of call before disaster struck. The ship's intended destination is not known, but Dr. Hadjidaki noted that the shape of the mound suggested that one end of the ship points to the southeast. Further excavations may produce more clues. Four amphoras were brought to the surface for detailed analysis, which enabled experts to date the wreck between 400 and 380 B.C. The entire site was meticulously mapped, and then one exploratory trench was dug. Beneath two layers of amphoras the archeologists uncovered a rich assortment of black-glazed ceramic wine cups and bowls, a small wine jar known as a kyathion, a cooking pot and a bronze bucket and ladle. 'More Marvelous Finds'
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F0CEFDA1638F930A25757C0A965958260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=2

Ancient Greek Wreck Found in Black Sea Sean Markey. National Geographic News. Researchers announced today their discovery of the shipwrecked remains of an ancient trading vessel over 2,300 years old that sank in the Black Sea off the coast of present-day Bulgaria. The vessel dates to the 5th to 3rd century B.C., an era known to scholars as the classical period of ancient Greece"the time of Plato when Athens reached the height of power and Zeus was believed to rule the celestial firmament.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/01/0110_030113_blacksea.html

Ancient Shipwreck Museum - Kyrenia, North Cyprus This Museum houses the oldest trading ship known to us with her cargo, which was raised from the bottom of the sea. The ship sailed in the Mediterranean during the life time of Alexander the Great and his successors. She sank in open waters less than a mile from the anchorage of Kyrenia. The evidence point to her being taken by rough seas around the year 300 B.C, when she was rather old.
http://www.cypnet.co.uk/ncyprus/city/kyrenia/castle/shipwreck/index.html

Ancient Wreck - Concept Paper - Wreck Site Nauticos " Ancient Wreck " Ships of Ancient Greece. The shipwreck is Hellinistic in origin, most probably dating from the end of the third century BC or the beginning of the second century BC. The cargo was largely amphora that contained wine. Two Rhodian amphoras are clearly present near the anchor stocks at what would have been the bow of the ship (Fig. 2). There are very few known wrecks from this time period and none of these are in such an excellent state of preservation.
http://www.nauticos.com/ancientwreck/conceptpaper-wrecksite.htm

Antikythera Wreck Wikipedia. The Antikythera wreck is a shipwreck that was discovered by sponge divers off the coast of the Greek island, Antikythera. Its approximate location is 35° 53' 23" (35.8897)N and 23° 18' 28" (23.3078)E, "20m off Point Glyphadia".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antikythera_wreck

Deep-sea Robot Photographs Ancient Greek Shipwreck Deborah Halber, News Office Correspondent. Sometime in the fourth century B.C., a Greek merchant ship sank off Chios and the Oinoussai islands in the eastern Aegean Sea. The wooden vessel may have succumbed to a storm or a fire, or maybe rough weather caused the cargo of 400 ceramic jars filled with wine and olive oil to shift without warning. The ship went down in 60 meters (about 200 feet) of water, where it remained unnoticed for centuries.
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2006/archaeology.html

Ingredients for Salad Dressing Found in Shipwreck Ingredients for Salad Dressing Found in 2,400-year old Shipwreck By Charles Q. Choi, Special to LiveScience. Genetic analysis has revealed the contents of an ancient shipwreck dating back to the era of the Roman Republic and Athenian Empire. The cargo was olive oil flavored with oregano. Beyond discovering ingredients for Italian salad dressing on the sea floor, such research could provide a wealth of insights concerning the everyday life of ancient seafaring civilizations that would otherwise be lost at sea. An international team of U.S. and Greek researchers investigated the remains of a 2,400-year-old shipwreck that lies 230 feet (70 meters) deep, roughly a half-mile (1 kilometer) off the coast of the Greek island of Chios in the Aegean Sea.
http://www.livescience.com/history/071108-shipwreck-genes.html

Tektas Shipwreck Excavation During the summer of 1999, INA began the excavation of a ship that sank between 450 and 425 B.C., the Golden Age of Classical Greece, the time when the Parthenon was being built, the time of Pericles, Thucydides, Sophocles, Socrates, Herodotus, Pheidias, and others whose names remain well known. It lies about 130 feet deep off a cape known as Tektas Burnu, north of ancient Teos on the western coast of Turkey.
http://ina.tamu.edu/tektas.htm

Underwater Archaeology - The British Museum Ancient Greece " Underwater Archaeology " The British Museum Interactive Game. In a mountainous land like mainland Greece, travel and transport by sea was often much easier than by land. However it held many dangers too: sudden storms and attacks by pirates could result in death or slavery for a ship's crew. The many ancient Greek shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea have given marine archaeologists a lot of information about the sort of goods that were traded. In the following challenge you can explore a shipwreck and try to find out where the ship may have visited.
http://www.ancientgreece.co.uk/geography/challenge/cha_set.html



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