The Day

The Jewish calendar reckons the days from evening to evening starting at 6:00 pm because of the Scripture:

"And there was evening and there was morning, one day" (Gen 1:5).

When it turns nighttime the day (a 24 hour period) ends and a new one begins. Therefore the day consists of two periods, the period of light (day) and the period of darkness (night).

 

Both Biblical and Talmudic literature make mention of a division of the night into three or four watches, the morning watch (Ex 14:24), the middle watch (Judges 7:19) and the beginning of the watches (Lam 2:19).

 

The Hour

The hour is divided into 1,080 bars (halakim). The Talmud states that a day has 24 hours, one hour has 24 "onot". The "Onah" has 24 "ittot". One "et" has 24 "rega’im."

 

The Jewish Calendar in Ancient Hebrew History

Bible History Online

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The Jewish Calendar in Old Testament Times (Click around the Image)

jewishyear_shg.jpg Nisan - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Iyyar - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Sivan - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Tammuz - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Av - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Elul - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Tishri - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Heshvan - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Chislev - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Tebeth - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Shebat - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Adar - Ancient Hebrew Calendar The Jewish Year in Ancient Hebrew History

Nisan

Iyyar

Sivan

Tammuz

Av

Elul

Tishri

Heshvan

Chislev

Tebeth

Shebat

Adar

 

Introduction

Overview

Feasts and Festivals

Babylonian Calendar

History of the Jewish Calendar

Dictionaries and Encyclopedias

God's Calendar - Heart Message

 

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The Ancient Jewish Calendar
Bible History Online

The Story of the Bible


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