Beginning of Night

Nighttime, which we mentioned is the borderline between two consecutive days, is the moment when three stars of the second magnitude become visible (zet ha-kokabim). Thus the length of a day is "from the rising of the morning" (Neh 4:21) "until the stars appear."

 

It is important in Judaism that the "zet ha-kokabim" appears during Sabbaths and feast days at different times because the appearance of stars varies from day to day and from place to place. In modern Judaism these figures are calculated.

 

The Jewish Calendar in Ancient Hebrew History

Bible History Online

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The Jewish Calendar in Old Testament Times (Click around the Image)

jewishyear_shg.jpg Nisan - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Iyyar - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Sivan - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Tammuz - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Av - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Elul - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Tishri - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Heshvan - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Chislev - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Tebeth - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Shebat - Ancient Hebrew Calendar Adar - Ancient Hebrew Calendar The Jewish Year in Ancient Hebrew History

Nisan

Iyyar

Sivan

Tammuz

Av

Elul

Tishri

Heshvan

Chislev

Tebeth

Shebat

Adar

 

Introduction

Overview

Feasts and Festivals

Babylonian Calendar

History of the Jewish Calendar

Dictionaries and Encyclopedias

God's Calendar - Heart Message

 

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The Ancient Jewish Calendar
Bible History Online

The Story of the Bible


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