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Bust of Tiberius Caesar

Bust of Tiberius Caesar (Emperor of Rome)
Did Tiberius Caesar know Jesus was being crucified?

This painted sketch from the National Museum in naples reveals the face of Tiberius Caesar, the adopted son of Augustus. He was born in 42 BC and became Emperor in 14 AD. As a citizen he was honorable, but as an Emperor he was cruel and wicked.

The face of the Roman Emperor, Tiberius from the statue now in the Museo Nazionale, Naples. Tiberius was the stepson of Augustus and the oldest son of Livia, wife of Augustus. Augustus adopted Tiberius in 4 A.D. because he lacked a male heir. He had first adopted his younger stepson Drusus, but he died in 9 B.C. after falling from his horse. In 14 A.D. Tiberius became Emperor of Rome.

Whether Tiberius had heard of Jesus, or knew about the crucifixion of Jesus is a matter of speculation. There is no doubt that word about Jesus and his miracles spread quickly throughout the Roman Empire, even to the Imperial Palace on Palatine Hill, but Tiberius had retired to his palace on the Island of Capri in 26 A.D. while all sorts of corruption was happening in Rome. He left Sejanus in charge of Rome who eventually betrayed him and was later tried by the Senate upon orders by Tiberius, and then executed. Meanwhile there were many rumors about Tiberius on Capri involving homosexuality and sexual perversity with young boys, which included all sorts of inhumane cruelty. In this picture it shows the "Tiberius Leap" (Salto di Tiberio) which is a giant 1000 foot cliff that, according to the historians Suetonius and Tacitus, Tiberius hurled his discarded young sexual conquests and victims into the sea to their deaths for orgasmic pleasure.

The bust of Tiberius Caesar is important in the study of Biblical Archaeology, it reveals the image and reality of a person mentioned in the Bible, who was the emperor of Rome during the time of Christ's life.

"Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene, Annas and Caiaphas being the high priests, the word of God came unto John the son of Zacharias in the wilderness." Luke 3:1-2

Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli

Tiberius crowned. A colossal bust, the armour adorned with trophies. As a private citizen he was much esteemed, but he was an extremely vicious and cruel Emperor.

Augustus Caesar

Micah 5:2 - But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, [though] thou be little among the thousands of Judah, [yet] out of thee shall he come forth unto me [that is] to be ruler in Israel; whose goings forth [have been] from of old, from everlasting.

Tiberius Caesar Scripture - Luke 3:1 Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene,
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Luke/3/

Daniel 2:40 - "And the fourth kingdom shall be strong as iron: forasmuch as iron breaketh in pieces and subdueth all [things]: and as iron that breaketh all these, shall it break in pieces and bruise."

Acts 23:11 - And the night following the Lord stood by him, and said, Be of good cheer, Paul: for as thou hast testified of me in Jerusalem, so must thou bear witness also at Rome.

 


 Tiberius as a youth

 


Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli

Matthew 22:17-22 "Tell us therefore, What thinkest thou? Is it lawful to give tribute unto Caesar, or not? But Jesus perceived their wickedness, and said, Why tempt ye me, hypocrites? Shew me the tribute money. And they brought unto him a penny. And he saith unto them, Whose is this image and superscription? They say unto him, Caesar's. Then saith he unto them, Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's; and unto God the things that are God's. When they had heard these words, they marveled, and left him, and went their way."

Tiberius Tribute Penny - Roman Denarius
Tiberius Coin


Crowned Tiberius


Tiberius in the Vatican, Italy

More Images of Tiberius and Rome's Emperors

 

Reign 18 September 14 AD – 16 March 37 AD (22 years, 179 days)

Dynasty Julio-Claudian

Full name
Birth to adoption:
Tiberius Claudius Nero
Adoption to accession: Tiberius Julius Caesar
As Emperor: Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus
Imperial name: Imperator Caesar Divi filius Augustus

Born 6 November 42 BC

Birthplace Rome, Roman Republic

Died 16 March AD 37 (aged 77)

Place of death Misenum in southern Italy

Buried Mausoleum of Augustus, Rome

Predecessor Augustus

Successor Caligula (March 37 AD), his adopted grandson

Married to  1. Vipsania Agrippina (20-12 BC), 2. Julia the Elder (11-2 BC)

Children  Drusus Julius Caesar (by Vipsania Agrippina), Tiberillus, Germanicus (adoptive per Augustus)

Father Tiberius Nero

Mother Livia Drusilla

Tiberius Caesar

A Real Controlling Spirit

A Dreadful Glimpse of Dysfunctional Drama

Sometimes a single snapshot from a different angle might illuminate the kind of dominance contrasted by the humility Jesus exemplified and taught his disciples to live.

In 26 BC Augustus, the first emperor of Rome and step-father of Tiberius became gravely ill and the fear of dying without a successor became a powerful drive. Tiberius as one of the possible heirs to the throne was dominated by his powerful father, who forced him into politics in 24 BC at the age of 17.

Tiberius was also made a general over Roman legions and upon returning to Rome after foreign campaigns in 19 BC he married Vipsania Agrippina, the daughter of Augustus’s close friend and great general, Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa. This marriage had been pre-arranged by Augustus before her first birthday. It is reported that Tiberius loved Vipsanius very much.

Previously, in approximately 21 BC, Augustus was somewhat afraid of the rising power of Agrippa and thought to keep him close by forcing a marriage to his daughter Julia. To accomplish this Agrippa was then forced to divorce his wife Marcella to marry his daughter Julia who was 25 years younger at the age of 18. They had five children together.

It doesn’t end there… keep following.

In time, General Tiberius was sent to fight in the Alps, returning again to Rome in 13 BC, Agrippa his father-in-law had died, so his father Caesar Augustus forced him to divorce Vipsania, the woman he loved, and marry Julia who was the widow of Agrippa, his father-in-law, and Tiberius’s step-sister. Vipsania was abandoned.
Julia was known for her adulteries and her marriage with Tiberius was not happy. They had one child who died in infancy. They did not like each other at all. According to Suetonius, Tiberius ran into Vipsania again and followed her home crying and begging forgiveness. Steps were taken to make sure he would never see her again. Tiberius and Julia were separated around 6 BC.

Could it be that Augustus had some responsibility for the monster that Tiberius turned out to be? Only God knows. But our Lord and Savior calls us not to be controlling over others, but to lead in humility.

"Then the mother of Zebedee's sons came to Jesus with her sons and, kneeling down, asked a favor of him.
"What is it you want?" he asked.
She said, "Grant that one of these two sons of mine may sit at your right and the other at your left in your kingdom."
"You don't know what you are asking," Jesus said to them. "Can you drink the cup I am going to drink"
"We can," they answered.
Jesus said to them, "You will indeed drink from my cup, but to sit at my right or left is not for me to grant. These places belong to those for whom they have been prepared by my Father."
When the ten heard about this, they were indignant with the two brothers. Jesus called them together and said, "You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their high officials exercise authority over them. Not so with you. Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be your slave— just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many." Matt. 20:20-24

===========================

Tiberius in Wikipedia Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus (November 16, 42 BC – March 16, AD 37), born Tiberius Claudius Nero, was Roman Emperor from 14 AD to 37 AD. Tiberius was by birth a Claudian, son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla. His mother divorced his father and was remarried to Augustus in 39 BC, making him a step-son of Octavian. Tiberius would later marry Augustus' daughter Julia the Elder (from his marriage to Scribonia) and even later be adopted by Augustus, by which act he officially became a Julian, bearing the name Tiberius Julius Caesar. The subsequent emperors after Tiberius would continue this blended dynasty of both families for the next forty years; historians have named it the Julio-Claudian dynasty. In relations to the other emperors of this dynasty, Tiberius was the stepson of Augustus, great-uncle of Caligula, paternal uncle of Claudius, and great-great uncle of Nero. Tiberius was one of Rome's greatest generals, conquering Pannonia, Dalmatia, Raetia, and temporarily Germania; laying the foundations for the northern frontier. But he came to be remembered as a dark, reclusive, and somber ruler who never really desired to be emperor; Pliny the Elder called him tristissimus hominum, "the gloomiest of men."[1] After the death of Tiberius’ son Drusus Julius Caesar in 23, the quality of his rule declined and ended in a terror. In 26, Tiberius exiled himself from Rome and left administration largely in the hands of his unscrupulous Praetorian Prefects Sejanus and Macro. Caligula, Tiberius' grand-nephew and adopted grandson, succeeded the emperor upon his death...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiberius

Tiberius in Roman Biography Ti-be'ri-us, [Fr. Tibere, te'baiR' ; It. Tiberio, teba're- o,] or, more fully, Ti-be'rI-us Clau'dl-us Ne'ro, a celebrated emperor of Rome, born in 42 B.C. He was a son of Livia Drusilla, the wife of Augustus, by her first marriage, and belonged to the patrician peps Claudia, His father was T. Claudius Nero. At an early age he acquired a high reputation in military affairs, and served with distinction in Spain, Asia Minor, and Germany. His talents were respectable, if not superior. He was well versed in Greek and Latin literature. His first wife was Vipsania Agrippina, a daughter of Agrippa. About 12 B.C. he was compelled to divorce her, and to marry Julia, a daughter of the emperor Augustus. He passed seven years at Rhodes in retirement, and returned to Rome in 2 A.D. After the death of Caius Caesar, in 4 A.D., Augustus adopted Tiberius as his son and successor. He became emperor in the year 14, and at first used his power with moderation. He had a suspicious temper, and was a most artful dissembler. He chose for his favourite minister and adviser the infamous Sejanus, to whom he soon abandoned the direction of the government. Tiberius was suspected of being accessory to the death of Germanicus, (19 A.D.) His only son, Drusus, was poisoned by Sejanusin 23. In the year 26 he left Rome, to which he never returned, and retired to the island of Capri, (Capreae.) Avoiding publicity and neglecting affairs of state, he abandoned himself to debauchery. In 31 A.D. Sejamis was put to death by the order or permission of Tiberius, and Macro became the powerful favourite. Tiberius died in 37 A.D., without appointing his successor. It is stated that he was suffocated by Macro, by whose aid Caligula then became emperor. "The historian," says Macaulay, (referring to Tacitus,) " undertook to make us intimately acquainted with a man singularly dark and inscrutable,—with a man whose real disposition long remained swathed up in intricate folds of factitious virtues, and over whose actions the hypocrisy of his youth and the seclusion of his old age threw a singular mystery. . . . He was to exhibit the old sovereign of the world sinking into a dotage which, though it rendered his appetites eccentric and his temper savage, never impaired the powers of his stern and penetrating mind, conscious of failing strength, raging with capricious sensuality, yet to the last the keenest of observers, the most artful of dissemblers, and the most terrible of masters. The task was one of extreme difficulty. The execution is almost perfect." (Essay on " History.") See Suetonius, " Tiberius ;" Tacitus, " Annales ;" Sievers, "Tacitus und Tiberius," 1850: V. Duruy, " De Tiberio Imperatore," 1853 ; Merivai.e, " History of the Romans under the Empire ;" Hose, " De Tiberio Cajsare," 1661 ; "Nouvelle Biosraphie Generale."
http://www.bible-history.com/links.php?cat=47&sub=4609&cat_name=People+-+Ancient+Rome&subcat_name=Tiberius

Tiberius in Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities An emperor of Rome from A.D. 14 to 37. His full name was Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar. He was the son of T. Claudius Nero and of Livia, and was born on the 16th of November, B.C. 42, before his mother married Augustus. Tiberius was tall and strongly made, and his health was good. His face was handsome, and his eyes large. He was carefully educated, and became well acquainted with Greek and Latin literature, his master in rhetoric being Theodorus of Gadara. Though not without military courage, as his life shows, he had a great timidity of character, and was of a jealous and suspicious temper; and these qualities rendered him cruel after he had acquired power. There can be little doubt that his morose reserve and his dissimulation had been increased, if not created, by his relations to Augustus. As emperor the difficulties of his position, and the influence of Livia and still more of Seianus, increased his tendency to jealousy and suspicion of all who seemed rivals or dangerous from their popularity. The system of espionage and delation (see Delatores) once begun could only increase with each act of tyranny and cruelty, till his rule became a veritable reign of terror. Yet in reading his history, especially the tales of his monstrous and incredible licentiousness, it must be recollected that Tacitus and Suetonius both wrote with a strong bias against him and his rule, and were ready to accept as true the worst scandals which were handed down. If Velleius was prejudiced in the other direction, it is at least right to adopt some part of his less unfavourable portrait and to imagine that the old age of Tiberius was not so absolutely contradictory of his youth as it is sometimes made to appear. The cruelty of his rule applied only to Rome. The testimony of Iosephus and Philo shows that his provincial government was just and lenient. In B.C. 11, Augustus compelled Tiberius, much against his will, to divorce his wife, Vipsania Agrippina, and to marry Iulia, the widow of Agrippa, and daughter of the emperor, with whom Tiberius, however, did not long live in harmony. Tiberius was thus brought into still closer contact with the imperial family; but as Gaius and Lucius Caesar, the grandsons of Augustus, were still living, the prospect of Tiberius succeeding to the imperial power seemed very remote. He was employed on various military services. In 20, he was sent by Augustus to restore Tigranes to the throne of Armenia. It was during this campaign that Horace addressed one of his epistles to Iulius Florus (i. 12), who was serving under Tiberius. In 15, Drusus and his brother Tiberius were engaged in warfare with the Raeti, and the exploits of the two brothers were sung by Horace (Carm. iv. 4, 14). In 13, Tiberius was consul with P. Quintilius Varus. In 11, while his brother Drusus was fighting against the Germans, Tiberius conducted the war against the Dalmatians and against the Pannonians. Drusus died in 9, owing to a fall from his horse. On the news of the accident, Tiberius was sent by Augustus to Drusus, whom he found just alive. Tiberius returned to the war in Germany, and crossed the Rhine. In 7 he was consul a second time. In 6 he obtained the tribunicia potestas for five years, but during this year he retired with the emperor's permission to Rhodes, where he spent the next seven years. Tacitus says that his chief reason for leaving Rome was to get away from his wife, who treated him with contempt, and whose licentious life was no secret to her husband; probably, too, he was unwilling to stay at Rome when the grandsons of Augustus were attaining years of maturity, for there was mutual jealousy between them and Tiberius. He returned to Rome A.D. 2. He was relieved from one trouble during his absence, for his wife Iulia had been banished to the island of Tiberius. (Vatican.) Pandataria (B.C. 2), and he never saw her again.
http://www.bible-history.com/links.php?cat=47&sub=4609&cat_name=People+-+Ancient+Rome&subcat_name=Tiberius


Political Events in Tiberius Caesar's Life
 

13 BC
7 BC
14-37 AD
14-37 AD
18 AD
21 AD
31 AD
 
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Publius Quinctilius Varus
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso
Roman Emperor
Julio-Claudian Dynasty
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Germanicus
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Drusus Julius Caesar
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Sejanus
 

 

Significant Dates in Tiberius Caesar's Life

 

BC  
42 Tiberius is born on on November 16.
   
38 Drusus is born. Octavian and Livia marry.
   
33 Death of Tiberius Nero (father of Tiberius). Tiberius is betrothed to Vipsania.
   
27 Tiberius assumes the toga virilis
   
26 Tiberius becomes military tribune og Spain.
   
23 Tiberius is made quaestor.
   
22 Tiberius prosecutes Fannius Caepio.
   
21 Agrippa marries Julia.
   
20 Tiberius in Armenia. Tiberius marries Vipsania.
   
17 Augustus adopts Gaius and Lucius.
   
16 Tiberius is made praetor.
   
15 Tiberius and Drusus in Rhaetia and Vindelicia. Germanicus is born.
   
14 Drusus is born.
   
13 Tiberius becomes consul with Publius Quinctilius Varus
   
12 Agrippa died. Agrippa Postumus is born. Tiberius is betrothed to Julia. Tiberius goes to Illyricum.
   
11 Tiberius in Illyricum. Tiberius and Drusus receive proconsular imperium. Tiberius marries Julia.
   
10  Julia and Tiberius bear a son.
   
9 Drusus is consul and dies.
   
8 Tiberius goes to Germany.
   
7 Tiberius is consul a second time with Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso. Tiberius is triumphant.
   
6 Tiberius becomes tribune,  he retires to Rhodes.
   
2 Tiberius and Julia divorce; Julia is exiled to Pandateria.
   
1 Gaius heads East.
   
AD  
1 Gaius becomes consul.
   
2 Tiberius returns to Rome. Lucius dies.
   
4 Gaius dies. Tiberius becomes tribune. Tiberius adopts Germanicus. Augustus adopts Tiberius and Agrippa Postumus
   
5 Tiberius in Germany.
   
6 Pannonian revolt.
   
9-Jul Tiberius in Illyricum.
   
9 Clades Variana.
   
11-Oct Tiberius in Germany.
   
12 Germanicus becomes  consul. Caligula is born. Tiberius is triumphant again.
   
13 Tiberius' imperium = Augustus'. Tiberius' tribunician authority is renewed.
   
14 Augustus dies. Execution of Agrippa Postumus. Tiberius accepts principate. Germanicus is in Germany. Julia dies.
   
15 Drusus becomes consul. Tiberius becomes Pontifex maximus.
   
16 Germanicus in Germany.
   
17 Germanicus is triumphant. Drusus goes to Illyricum. Germanicus appointed to the East. Earthquake in Asia.
   
17-24 War against Tacfarinas in north Africa, commanded by Sejanus' uncle Quintus Junius Blaesus.
   
18 Tiberius made consul a third time. Drusus is made consul a second time. Tiberius in Campania.
   
22 Drusus is tribune.
   
23 Sejanus and Apicata divorce. Drusus dies. Germanicus the son of Drusus dies.
   
26 Tiberius leaves Rome.
   
27 Tiberius retires to the island of Capri.
   
28 Trial of Titius Sabinus. Marriage of Agrippina the younger to Domitius Ahenobarbus.
   
29  Livia dies. Exile of Agrippina and Nero.
   
30 Imprisonment of Asinius Gallus, Drusus. Betrothal of Sejanus and Livia Julia.
   
33 Death of Asinius Gallus. Death of Drusus. Death of Agrippina.
   
37 Death of Tiberius on March 16.

 

 

Tiberius Silver Coin
      Tiberius Caesar Silver Coin

Tiberius Caesar

The empress Livia bore a son from a previous marriage whom she named "Tiberius." Augustus was not impressed with Tiberius, even though he was an able soldier. He forced Tiberius to divorce the one he loved, Vipsania, and to marry Julia, his adulterous daughter. The reign of Tiberius was damaged by treason trials, scandal, absence, indulgence, and his own personal orgies. In 26 A.D. Tiberius was 67 years old when he was persuaded by Sejanus, the reckless leader of the praetorian guard. He was advised to leave Rome and spend his life on the island of Capri, near the Bay of Naples. The ancient writer Suetonius wrote many scandalous stories regarding Tiberius and his orgies, indulgences, and sadistic displays. Tiberius learned of the treachery of Sejanus in 31 A.D. and had him executed. Sometime around 30 A.D. Jesus of Nazareth was crucified under the rule of Sejanus' prefect, Pontius Pilate, a fact which was known by the Roman historian, Tacitus.  romanemperors.com

Tiberius Caesar (42 bc- ad 37), Roman emperor ad 14-37; full name Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus. The adopted successor of his stepfather and father-in-law Augustus, he became increasingly tyrannical and his reign was marked by a growing number of treason trials and executions. [Oxford Dictionary]

Tiberius Caesar (Tiberius (14–37 C.E.). The early years of Tiberius' reign were peaceful and relatively benign. Tiberius secured the power of Rome and enriched its treasury. However, Tiberius' reign soon became characterized by paranoia and slander. In 19 C.E., he was widely blamed for the death of his nephew, the popular Germanicus. In 23 C.E. his own son Drusus died. More and more, Tiberius retreated into himself. He began a series of treason trials and executions. He left power in the hands of the commander of the guard, Aelius Sejanus. Tiberius himself retired to live at his villa on the island of Capri in 26 C.E., leaving administration in the hands of Sejanus, who carried on the persecutions with relish. Sejanus also began to consolidate his own power; in 31 C.E. he was named co-consul with Tiberius and married Livilla, the emperor's niece. At this point he was "hoisted by his own petard": the Emperor's paranoia, which he had so ably exploited for his own gain, was turned against him. Sejanus was put to death, along with many of his cronies, the same year. The persecutions continued until Tiberius' death in 37 C.E. [New World Ency]

Tiberius Caesar - Tiberius, the second Roman emperor (A.D. 14-37), b. November 16, 42 B.C.; d. March 16, A.D. 37. He was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia. By the marriage of his mother with Emperor Augustus he became the latter's stepson, and was adopted by Augustus in A.D. 4. In the year 10 he was appointed coregent with Augustus. Hard and secretive by nature and embittered by the neglect with which his step-father allowed him to be treated, he did not arouse personal enthusiasm, and until recently was described by historians as a bloody tyrant. It is only during the last sixty years that he has been more fairly judged, and at present the opinion begins to prevail that he was a genuine Roman, a ruler faithful to his duties, just, wise, and self-contained. In his internal policies especially he is one of the most distinguished of all Roman emperors. Like Augustus he reformed and improved every department of the government, and promoted in every direction the prosperity of the empire of which Augustus had laid the foundation. He developed imperial power by declining to have his authority renewed from time to time by the Senate, as Augustus had done. The strong opposition which grew up against him was due to his taciturn and domineering disposition, and to the influence of the prefect of the guard, Aelius Sejanus, who alone possessed his confidence. The persecutions and executions for lese-majesty, which rapidly increased during the second half of his reign, and the gloom which pervaded Rome induced Tiberius to leave the capital altogether in the year 26 and to live partly in Campania and partly on the Island of Capri. Before this date the question as to the succession to the empire had led to a terrible family tragedy. By his first marriage Tiberius had a son called Drusus, while his second marriage with theimmoral Julia, daughter of Augustus, was childless. After the death of his nephew Germanicus (A.D. 19), whom he had been obliged to adopt at the command of Augustus to the exclusion of his own son, he hoped to secure the succession for Drusus. A low intrigue was formed against this plan, in which the wife of Drusus, Livilla, who had illicit relations with Sejanus, took part. In the year 23 Drusus was poisoned by Sejanus and Livilla. However, when in 31 Sejanus formed a conspiracy to secure the throne for himself, Tiberius was warned at the last moment and had Sejanus executed. Tiberius spent his last years in constantly increasing seclusion, misanthropy, and cruelty on the Island of Capri, where it is said he abandoned himself to debauchery. However, these reports are at least colored by prejudice and have not been satisfactorily proved. Neither is it probable that Tiberius was murdered. The ministry and death of John the Baptist and of Jesus Christ occurred during the reign of Tiberius. According to St. Luke (iii, 1), St. John the Baptist was called by God, in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius, to prepare the way for Christ as His precursor. Shortly before his death Tiberius recalled the procurator Pontius Pilate from Judea. Tertullian (Apologeticum, v, xxi), from whom Eusebius and Orosius take the story, relates that Tiberius received a report concerning Christ and that he called upon the Senate to place Christ among the gods. The Senate rejected the request; Tiberius then threatened the accusers of the Christians with punishment. The narrative is not worthy of belief, still it is probable that Tertullian knew a document that professed to be a report of Pilate. [Catholic Encyclopedia]


Portrait of Roman Emperor Augustus
Portrait of Roman Emperor Augustus, Archaeological Museum of Istanbul.


Younger Octavian
Sculpture of the first Roman Emperor as younger Octavian.

Tiberius Caesar in Easton's Bible Dictionary i.e., as known in Roman history, Tiberius Claudius Nero, only mentioned in Luke 3:1. He was the stepson of Augustus, whom he succeeded on the throne, A.D. 14. He was noted for his vicious and infamous life. In the fifteenth year of his reign John the Baptist entered on his public ministry, and under him also our Lord taught and suffered. He died A.D. 37. He is frequently referred to simply as "Caesar" (Matt. 22:17, 21; Mark 12:14, 16, 17; Luke 20:22, 24, 25; 23:2; John 19:12, 15).
http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/T/Tiberius+Caesar/

Tiberius Caesar in Naves Topical Bible -An important emperor of Rome Lu 3:1
http://www.bible-history.com/naves/T/TIBERIUS+CAESAR/

Tiberius Caesar Scripture - Luke 3:1 Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene,
http://www.bible-history.com/kjv/Luke/3/

Tiberius in Fausset's Bible Dictionary Tiberias Claudius Nero, Augustus' step-son and successor as emperor. Reigned A.D. 14 to 37. Son of Tiberias Claudius Nero and Livia. Born at Rome, Nov. 16, 45 B.C. Fifty-five years old at his accession, having already shown ability as a commander, an orator, and an administrator. Horace celebrates his and his brother Drasus' exploits (Odes, 4:4,14). Henceforth slothful, self-indulgent, cruel, and despotic. Died at 78 after a 23 years' reign. Tacitus (Annals 1 to 6) describes vividly his dissimulation and vindictiveness. In speaking of Nero he says: "in order to remove the rumour of his having set fire to Rome, Nero shifted the charge on others, and inflicted the most refined punishments on those whom the populace called Christians, and who were hated for their scandalous doings. The author of the name, Christ, in the reign of Tiberias was visited with capital punishment by the governor Pontius Pilate." In Luke 3:1 John the Baptist's (six months senior to our Lord) ministry is set down in the 15th year of Tiberias' "principate" (hegemonia). Augustus admitted Tiberias to share the empire two or three years before his own death, so that "the 15th year" is to be dated from the co-partnership at the end of A.U.C. 764. The 15th year will thus be the end of 779, and our Lord's birth 749 or 750, which agrees with Herod's death some time after Christ's birth. The Christian era fixed by Dionysius Exiguus in the sixth century places Christ's birth in the year 754.
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tiberius/

Tiberius in Hitchcock's Bible Names the son of Tiber
http://www.bible-history.com/hitchcock/T/Tiberius/

Tiberius in Smiths Bible Dictionary (in full, Tiberius Claudius Nero), the second Roman emperor, successor of Augustus, who began to reign A.D. 14 and reigned until A.D. 37. He was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia, and hence a stepson of Augustus. He was born at Rome on the 18th of November, B.C. 45. He became emperor in his fifty- fifth year, after having distinguished himself as a commander in various wars, and having evinced talents of a high order as an orator and an administrator of civil affairs. He even gained the reputation of possessing the sterner virtues of the Roman character, and was regarded as entirely worthy of the imperial honors to which his birth and supposed personal merits at length opened the way. Yet, on being raised to the supreme power, he suddenly became, or showed himself to be a very different man. His subsequent life was one of inactivity, sloth and self-indulgence. He was despotic in his government, cruel and vindictive in his disposition. He died A.D. 37, at the age of 78, after a reign of twenty-three years. Our Saviour was put to death in the reign of Tiberius.
http://www.bible-history.com/smiths/T/Tiberius/

Tiberius in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE ti-be'-ri-us (Tiberios): 1. Name and Parentage: The 2nd Roman emperor; full name Tiberius Claudius Nero, and official name as emperor Tiberius Caesar Augustus; born November 16, 42 BC. His father--of the same name--had been an officer under Julius Caesar and had later joined Antony against Octavian (Augustus). His mother was Livia, who became the 3rd wife of Augustus; thus Tiberius was a stepson of Augustus. 2. Early Life and Relation to Augustus: Much of his early life was spent in successful campaigning. Although the ablest of the possible heirs of Augustus, Tiberius was subjected to many an indignity, Augustus accepting him as his successor only when every other hope failed. When Julia, daughter of Augustus, became a widow for the second time (12 BC), Tiberius was obliged to marry her (11 BC) in order to become protector of the future emperors. For this purpose he was compelled to divorce his wife, Vipsania Agrippina, who had borne him a son, Drusus. Julia brought Tiberius nothing but shame, and for her immorality was banished by her father (2 BC). Tiberius was consul in 12 BC, and received the proconsular authority, 9 BC. He carried on successful wars in Pannonia, Dalmatia, Armenia and Germany. He retired in disgust to voluntary exile at Rhodes where he spent several years in study. In 2 AD, he returned to Rome, and lived there in retirement, 2-4 AD. On June 27, 4 AD, Tiberius and Agrippa Postumus were adopted by Augustus. From this date on Tiberius came more and more into prominence, receiving the tribunician power for 10 years...
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/T/TIBERIUS/


The Word "Caesar" is Mentioned many Times in the Bible
(Note: It was not always Tiberius because he died in 37 A.D.)

Luke 3:1 - Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene.

Matthew 22:21 - They say unto him, Caesar's. Then saith he unto them, Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's; and unto God the things that are God's.

Luke 3:1 - Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene,

John 19:15 - But they cried out, Away with [him], away with [him], crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests answered, We have no king but Caesar.

John 19:12 - And from thenceforth Pilate sought to release him: but the Jews cried out, saying, If thou let this man go, thou art not Caesar's friend: whosoever maketh himself a king speaketh against Caesar.

Luke 20:25 - And he said unto them, Render therefore unto Caesar the things which be Caesar's, and unto God the things which be God's.

Mark 12:14 - And when they were come, they say unto him, Master, we know that thou art true, and carest for no man: for thou regardest not the person of men, but teachest the way of God in truth: Is it lawful to give tribute to Caesar, or not?

Mark 12:17 - And Jesus answering said unto them, Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's. And they marvelled at him.

Acts 27:24 - Saying, Fear not, Paul; thou must be brought before Caesar: and, lo, God hath given thee all them that sail with thee.

Luke 23:2 - And they began to accuse him, saying, We found this [fellow] perverting the nation, and forbidding to give tribute to Caesar, saying that he himself is Christ a King.

Acts 11:28 - And there stood up one of them named Agabus, and signified by the Spirit that there should be great dearth throughout all the world: which came to pass in the days of Claudius Caesar.

Acts 25:11 - For if I be an offender, or have committed any thing worthy of death, I refuse not to die: but if there be none of these things whereof these accuse me, no man may deliver me unto them. I appeal unto Caesar.

Acts 25:21 - But when Paul had appealed to be reserved unto the hearing of Augustus, I commanded him to be kept till I might send him to Caesar.

Acts 17:7 - Whom Jason hath received: and these all do contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, [one] Jesus.

Luke 2:1 - And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.

Acts 28:19 - But when the Jews spake against [it], I was constrained to appeal unto Caesar; not that I had ought to accuse my nation of.

Matthew 22:17 - Tell us therefore, What thinkest thou? Is it lawful to give tribute unto Caesar, or not?

Acts 25:8 - While he answered for himself, Neither against the law of the Jews, neither against the temple, nor yet against Caesar, have I offended any thing at all.

Acts 26:32 - Then said Agrippa unto Festus, This man might have been set at liberty, if he had not appealed unto Caesar.

Luke 20:22 - Is it lawful for us to give tribute unto Caesar, or no?

Acts 25:12 - Then Festus, when he had conferred with the council, answered, Hast thou appealed unto Caesar? unto Caesar shalt thou go.

Sites to Visit:

Tiberius - Roman Emperors
 

Some Scriptures mentioning the word "Rome"

 

Acts 23:11 - And the night following the Lord stood by him, and said, Be of good cheer, Paul: for as thou hast testified of me in Jerusalem, so must thou bear witness also at Rome.

2 Timothy 4:22 - The Lord Jesus Christ [be] with thy spirit. Grace [be] with you. Amen. <[The second [epistle] unto Timotheus, ordained the first bishop of the church of the Ephesians, was written from Rome, when Paul was brought before Nero the second time.]>

Acts 18:2 - And found a certain Jew named Aquila, born in Pontus, lately come from Italy, with his wife Priscilla; (because that Claudius had commanded all Jews to depart from Rome:) and came unto them.

Colossians 4:18 - The salutation by the hand of me Paul. Remember my bonds. Grace [be] with you. Amen. <[Written from Rome to Colossians by Tychicus and Onesimus.]>

Ephesians 6:24 - Grace [be] with all them that love our Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity. Amen. <[To [the] Ephesians written from Rome, by Tychicus.]>

Philemon 1:25 - The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ [be] with your spirit. Amen. <[Written from Rome to Philemon, by Onesimus a servant.]>

Acts 2:10 - Phrygia, and Pamphylia, in Egypt, and in the parts of Libya about Cyrene, and strangers of Rome, Jews and proselytes,

Acts 19:21 - After these things were ended, Paul purposed in the spirit, when he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, After I have been there, I must also see Rome.

Acts 28:16 - And when we came to Rome, the centurion delivered the prisoners to the captain of the guard: but Paul was suffered to dwell by himself with a soldier that kept him.

Romans 1:7 - To all that be in Rome, beloved of God, called [to be] saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ.

Galatians 6:18 - Brethren, the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ [be] with your spirit. Amen. <[To [the] Galatians written from Rome.]>

Philippians 4:23 - The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ [be] with you all. Amen. <[To [the] Philippians written from Rome, by Epaphroditus.]>

Acts 28:14 - Where we found brethren, and were desired to tarry with them seven days: and so we went toward Rome.

Romans 1:15 - So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you that are at Rome also.

2 Timothy 1:17 - But, when he was in Rome, he sought me out very diligently, and found [me].

 

Some Scriptures mentioning the word "Augustus"

 

Luke 2:1 - And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.


Acts 27:1 - And when it was determined that we should sail into Italy, they delivered Paul and certain other prisoners unto [one] named Julius, a centurion of Augustus' band.

Acts 25:21 - But when Paul had appealed to be reserved unto the hearing of Augustus, I commanded him to be kept till I might send him to Caesar.

Acts 25:25 - But when I found that he had committed nothing worthy of death, and that he himself hath appealed to Augustus, I have determined to send him.

 


Related Pages:

Tiberius Caesar (Bible History Online) - Augustus was not Tiberius' true father, he was the son of Augustus' wife Livia, by her first husband. Tiberius was in power when Jesus was crucifie d. Tiberius ...
http://www.bible-history.com/sketches/ancient/tiberius-caesar.html

Bible History Online - Bust of Tiberius Caesar (Biblical Archaeology) - The face of the Roman Emperor, Tiberius from the statue now in the Museo Nazionale, Naples. Tiberius was the stepson of Augustus and the oldest son of Livia, ...
http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/rome/tiberius-caesar-bust.html

Pilate Inscription - Tiberius Caesar, who succeeded Augustus in AD 14, appointed Pontius Pilate as governor of Judea in 26 AD. Pilate arrived and made his official residence in ...
http://www.bible-history.com/empire s/pilate.html

TIBERIUS in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE (Bible History Online) - TIBERIUS ti-be'-ri-us (Tiberios): 1. Name and Parentage: The 2nd Roman emperor; full name Tiberius Claudius Nero, and official name as emperor < b>Tiberius ...
http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/T/TIBERIUS/

Tiberius: People - Ancient Rome - Bible History Links - Tiberius in Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities An emperor of Rome from A.D. 14 to 37. His full name was Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar. He was the son ...
http://www.bible-history.com/links.php?cat=47&sub=4609&cat_name=People+-+Ancient+Rome&subcat_name=Tiberius

Tiberius Caesar: Bible Names N-Z - Bible History Links - Tiberius Caesar in Easton's Bible Dictionary i.e., as known in Roman history, .. . Tiberius Caesar in Naves Topical Bible -An important emperor of Rome Lu 3:1 ...
http://www.bible-history.com/links.php?cat=45&sub=1940&cat_name=Bible+Names+N-Z&subcat_name=Tiberius+Caesar

Tiberius Denarius - Contents | Index. Tiberius Denarius. silver_shekel.jpg.
http://www.bible-history.com/taxcollectors/TAXCOLLECTORSTiberius_Denarius.htm

Tiberius - Biblical Definition of Tiberius in Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Tiberius. Tiberias Claudius Nero, Augustus' step-son and successor as emperor. Reigned A.D. 14 to 37. Son of Tiberias C laudius Nero and Livia. Born at Rome ...
http://www.bible-history.com/faussets/T/Tiberius/

Bible History Online - Bust of Tiberius Caesar (Biblical Archaeology) - The face of the Roman Emperor, Tiberius from the statue now in the Museo Nazionale, Naples. Tiberius was the stepson of Augustus and the oldest son of Livia, ...
http://www.bible-history.com/archaeology/rome/tiberius-caesar-bust.html

Tiberius Caesar - Agrippa finally set sail for Italy and came to see Tiberius Caesar on the island of Capri, where he was received warmly. But soon afterward a complaint arrived ...http://www.bible-history.com/herod_agrippa_i/HEROD_AGRIPPA_ITiberius_Caesar.htm

Map of Ancient Israel - Tiberias -
It was built by Herod Antipas, Tetrarch of Galilee, about A.D. 18 and named in honor of the Emperor Tiberius. The city was built like a Hellenistic or Roman city, ...
http://www.bible-history.com/geography/ancient-israel/tiberias.html

 


Ancient Texts

The Deeds of the Divine Augustus - Text (Written by Augustus in 14 A.D.)

The Deified Augustus - Text (Written by Suetonius)


The History of Rome - Part One 743 - 136 B.C.

Also see Roman Emperors - Photos, information , coins

 

Biblical Archaeology

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